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1999-2000 influenza season: Canadian laboratory diagnoses and strain characterization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196284
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2000 Nov 15;26(22):185-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2000
Author
Y. Li
Author Affiliation
Respiratory Viruses Section, National Microbiology Laboratory, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Winnipeg, Man.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2000 Nov 15;26(22):185-9
Date
Nov-15-2000
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antiviral Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Influenza A virus - drug effects - isolation & purification
Influenza B virus - drug effects - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - drug therapy - epidemiology - virology
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Population Surveillance
PubMed ID
11131691 View in PubMed
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[A prognostic model of the effect of the antiviral drug Relenza on the epidemic of A(H1N1)/2009 influenza].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128746
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2011 Sep-Oct;56(5):26-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
B V Boev
I F Ershov
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2011 Sep-Oct;56(5):26-30
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Algorithms
Antiviral Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Child
Computer simulation
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - drug effects
Influenza, Human - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Russia - epidemiology
Zanamivir - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
The paper gives the results of calculation-theoretical studies estimating the effect of the etiotropic agent Relenza (in preventing influenza in its susceptible patients an in treating patients ill with influenza) on the epidemic of pandemic A(H1N1)/2009 influenza in a large city of Russia. The values of its effect (the number of prevented cases of influenza and that of prevented deaths from its complications) have been calculated on a computer, by applying a modified PSEEI2RF influenza epidemic model (a Russian Baroyan-Rvachev model) with the A(H1N1)/2009 influenza pathogen that dominated in the 2009-2010 season in many countries of the world. Predictive estimates of the action of Relenza on the epidemic of A(H1N1)/2009 influenza have been obtained for 5 scenarios while implementing measures to treat patients with the illness and to prevent its susceptible patients in a large city with a population of one million. In conclusion, there are results of predicting the number of prevented A(H1N1)/2009 influenza cases and damage estimates for 6 cities of Russia due to the massive use of the antiviral drug Relenza.
PubMed ID
22171474 View in PubMed
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Development of oseltamivir and zanamivir resistance in influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, Denmark, 2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282237
Source
Euro Surveill. 2017 Jan 19;22(3)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-19-2017
Author
Ramona Trebbien
Svend Stenvang Pedersen
Kristine Vorborg
Kristina Træholt Franck
Thea Kølsen Fischer
Source
Euro Surveill. 2017 Jan 19;22(3)
Date
Jan-19-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antiviral Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Denmark
Drug Resistance, Viral - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Immunocompromised Host
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - diagnosis - drug therapy - virology
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell - complications
Middle Aged
Mutation - drug effects
Neuraminidase - genetics
Oseltamivir - pharmacology
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Treatment Outcome
Zanamivir - pharmacology
Abstract
Antiviral treatment of immunocompromised patients with prolonged influenza virus infection can lead to multidrug resistance. This study reveals the selection of antiviral resistance mutations in influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in an immunocompromised patient during a 6-month period. The patient was treated with two courses of oseltamivir (5 days and 2 months, respectively), with the first course starting at symptom onset, and subsequently zanamivir (2 months and 10 days, respectively). Respiratory samples were investigated by Sanger and next generation sequencing (NGS) and, for NGS data, low-frequency-variant-detection analysis was performed. Neuraminidase-inhibition tests were conducted for samples isolated in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. In a sample collected 15 days after the end of the first treatment with oseltamivir (Day 20 post-symptom onset), oseltamivir resistance was detected (mutation H275Y with 60.3% frequency by NGS). Day 149 when the patient had almost completed the second zanamivir treatment, mixes of the following resistance mutations were detected; H275Y(65.1%), I223R(9.2%), and E119G(89.6%), accompanied by additional mutations, showing a more complex viral population in the long-term treated patient. Two samples obtained on Day 151 from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and nasopharyngeal swab, respectively, showed different mutation profiles, with a higher frequency of antiviral resistance mutations in BAL. The results emphasise the importance of timely antiviral resistance testing both for treatment of individual patients as well as for preventive measures to control the development and transmission of antiviral resistant viruses.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28128091 View in PubMed
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[Information of the Center for Ecology and Epidemiology of Influenza, D. I. Ivanovsky Research Institute of Virology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, on the results of the 2009-2010 influenza and acute respiratory viral infection epidemic season (at week 40 of 2009 to week 22 of 2010) in the world and Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135957
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2011 Jan-Feb;56(1):44-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
D K L'vov
E I Burtseva
V V Lavrishcheva
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2011 Jan-Feb;56(1):44-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Viral - immunology
Antigens, Viral - immunology
Antiviral Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Drug Resistance, Viral - drug effects - immunology
Epidemics
Humans
Influenza A virus - drug effects - pathogenicity
Influenza B virus - drug effects - pathogenicity
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control - therapy - virology
Oseltamivir - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Rimantadine - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Russia - epidemiology
Vaccination
Zanamivir - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
The paper describes the specific features of the 2009-2010 epidemic season in Russia and the world, which are due to the wide spread of a new pandemic strain of influenza A(H1N1)v virus. There is an unusual early upsurge in the incidence of influenza and acute respiratory viral infection (ARVI) (in October-November 2009) with its peak at weeks 45 to 48 of the year with a succeeding reduction to the seasonal values by its end. The circulation of influenza B virus strains was recorded in February-April 2010, which was responsible for the higher epidemic thresholds of morbidity in a number of Russia's regions. A study of the antigenic properties of the strains defined their relationship to the reference strains A/California/07/2009 (H1N1)v and B/Brisbene/60/2008. There were strains with amino acid substitutions at position 222 of hemagglutinin in the population of pandemic influenza A(H1N1)v virus. The strains of the new pandemic influenza A(H1N1)v virus were resistant to remantadine and susceptible to oseltamivir, zanamivir, and arbidol. The influenza B virus strains were susceptible to oseltamivir, zanamivir, and arbidol. The proportion of pathogens of some ARVIs was as follows: parainfluenza viruses, 9.8%; adenoviruses, 5.5%; respiratory syncytial virus, 4.8%; and Mycoplasma pneumonia, 0.6%. There is evidence that there is a need for further monitoring of influenza viruses in Russia.
PubMed ID
21427956 View in PubMed
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Nationwide experience of treatment with protease inhibitors in chronic hepatitis C patients in Denmark: identification of viral resistance mutations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266500
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(12):e113034
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Christina Sølund
Henrik Krarup
Santseharay Ramirez
Peter Thielsen
Birgit T Røge
Suzanne Lunding
Toke S Barfod
Lone G Madsen
Britta Tarp
Peer B Christensen
Jan Gerstoft
Alex L Laursen
Jens Bukh
Nina Weis
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(12):e113034
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antiviral Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Resistance, Viral - genetics
Female
Genotype
Hepacivirus - drug effects - enzymology - genetics
Hepatitis C, Chronic - drug therapy - epidemiology - virology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Protease Inhibitors - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Treatment Failure
Viral Nonstructural Proteins - genetics
Abstract
The first standard of care in treatment of chronic HCV genotype 1 infection involving directly acting antivirals was protease inhibitors telaprevir or boceprevir combined with pegylated-interferon and ribavirin (triple therapy). Phase III studies include highly selected patients. Thus, treatment response and development of viral resistance during triple therapy in a routine clinical setting needs to be determined. The aims of this study were to investigate treatment outcome and identify sequence variations after triple therapy in patients with chronic HCV genotype 1 infection in a routine clinical setting.
80 patients, who initiated and completed triple therapy in Denmark between May 2011 and November 2012, were included. Demographic data and treatment response were obtained from the Danish Database for Hepatitis B and C. Direct sequencing and clonal analysis of the RT-PCR amplified NS3 protease were performed in patients without cure following triple therapy.
38 (47%) of the patients achieved cure, 15 (19%) discontinued treatment due to adverse events and remained infected, and 27 (34%) experienced relapse or treatment failure of whom 15 of 21 analyzed patients had well-described protease inhibitor resistance variants detected. Most frequently detected protease variants were V36M and/or R155K, and V36M, in patients with genotype 1a and 1b infection, respectively.
The cure rate after triple therapy in a routine clinical setting was 47%, which is substantially lower than in clinical trials. Resistance variants towards protease inhibitors were seen in 71% of patients failing therapy indicating that resistance could have an important role in treatment response.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25438153 View in PubMed
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Palivizumab prophylaxis for respiratory syncytial virus in Canada: utilization and outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188975
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2002 Jun;21(6):512-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Paul I Oh
Krista L Lanctôt
Alice Yoon
David S C Lee
Bosco A Paes
Brian S Simmons
Diana Parison
Patricia Manzi
Author Affiliation
HOPE Research Centre, Sunnybrook, and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. paul.oh@swchsc.on.ca
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2002 Jun;21(6):512-8
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Antiviral Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia - pathology
Canada
Demography
Female
Guideline Adherence - standards
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - immunology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - drug therapy - prevention & control
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses - drug effects
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To provide information on the use and outcomes of palivizumab prophylaxis in children at high risk of serious respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection.
Observational, prospective, longitudinal, multicenter study.
Eighteen hospitals and pediatric clinics located in six provinces across Canada.
Infants enrolled in the palivizumab Special Access Programme of Canada's Therapeutic Products Programme throughout the 1999 to 2000 RSV season. Most were premature infants born at
PubMed ID
12182374 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of polymorphisms with significant resistance to NS5A inhibitors in treatment-naive patients with hepatitis C virus genotypes 1a and 3a in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272587
Source
Infect Dis (Lond). 2015 Aug;47(8):555-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Ida Lindström
Midori Kjellin
Navaneethan Palanisamy
KÃ¥re Bondeson
Lars Wesslén
Anders Lannergard
Johan Lennerstrand
Source
Infect Dis (Lond). 2015 Aug;47(8):555-62
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antiviral Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Drug Resistance, Viral - genetics
Genotype
Hepacivirus - drug effects - genetics
Hepatitis C - virology
Hepatitis C, Chronic - virology
Imidazoles - therapeutic use
Mutation, Missense
Phylogeny
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prevalence
Protease Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Sequence Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Viral Nonstructural Proteins - antagonists & inhibitors - genetics
Abstract
The future treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection will be combinations of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) that not only target multiple viral targets, but are also effective against different HCV genotypes. Of the many drug targets in HCV, one promising target is the non-structural 5A protein (NS5A), against which inhibitors, namely daclatasvir, ledipasvir and ombitasvir, have shown potent efficacy. However, since HCV is known to have very high sequence diversity, development of resistance is a problem against but not limited to NS5A inhibitors (i.e. resistance also found against NS3-protease and NS5B non-nucleoside inhibitors), when used in suboptimal combinations. Furthermore, it has been shown that natural resistance against DAAs is present in treatment-naïve patients and such baseline resistance will potentially complicate future treatment strategies.
A pan-genotypic population-sequencing method with degenerated primers targeting the NS5A region was developed. We have investigated the prevalence of baseline resistant variants in 127 treatment-naïve patients of HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, 2b and 3a.
The method could successfully sequence more than 95% of genotype 1a, 1b and 3a samples. Interpretation of fold resistance data against the NS5A inhibitors was done with the help of earlier published phenotypic data. Baseline resistance variants associated with high resistance (1000-50,000-fold) was found in three patients: Q30H or Y93N in genotype 1a patients and further Y93H in a genotype 3a patient.
Using this method, baseline resistance can be examined and the data could have a potential role in selecting the optimal and cost-efficient treatment for the patient.
PubMed ID
25851241 View in PubMed
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[The 2009 pandemic influenza in Russia. I. Diagnosis and molecular biological characteristics of the virus].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135958
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2011 Jan-Feb;56(1):17-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
O I Kiselev
A B Komissarov
M A Stukova
Zh V Buzitskaia
M M Pisareva
E A Elpaeva
D M Danilenko
N I Konovalova
T M Gudkova
V A Grigor'eva
T S Smirnova
A V Slita
E A Romanovskaia-Roman'ko
L M Tsybalova
A A Sominina
M Iu Eropkin
M P Grudinin
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2011 Jan-Feb;56(1):17-21
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Amantadine - analogs & derivatives - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Amino Acid Substitution - drug effects
Animals
Antiviral Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Chick Embryo
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Resistance, Viral - drug effects - genetics
Hemagglutinins - diagnostic use - genetics
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality - virology
Lung - virology
Mexico
Middle Aged
Mortality
Nasopharynx - virology
Neuraminidase - diagnostic use - genetics
Oseltamivir - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Pandemics
Phylogeny
Reassortant Viruses - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Russia
Trachea - virology
United States
Viral Matrix Proteins - diagnostic use - genetics
Viral Proteins - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
The analysis of 1558 clinical samples revealed influenza virus A(H1N1v) RNA in 339 patients with influenza and 163 fatal cases,which was made in May to December 2009. Data on the antigenic properties of more than 250 of pandemic virus strains isolated at the Research Institute of Influenza and the molecular genetic characteristics of 31 strains are presented. All the test isolates were found to have the S203 substitution in hemagglutinin, which was characteristic of one of 5 minor genome A(H1N1v) virus variants found in the United States and Mexico in 2009. All the test strains contain the S31N substitution in the M2 protein, which determines viral resistance to adamantine, and have no H275Y substitution in neuraminidase, which determines oseltamivir resistance. The substitution of amino acid residue of Asp to Gly at position 222 of HA was found in 8 (73%) of 11 isolates from postmortem lung and trachea samples and in 2 (10%) of 20 isolates from nasopharyngeal swabs. The determination of the pathogenic role of this substitution calls for further investigations.
PubMed ID
21427949 View in PubMed
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The use of anaferon (pediatric formulation) for prophylaxis of acute respiratory viral infections in preschool children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98544
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2009 Aug;148(2):266-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
E I Kondrat'eva
L A Matveeva
T A Shemyakina
Yu I Logvinenko
E V Golikova
E B Kutuzova
Author Affiliation
Siberian State Medical Universoty, Federal Agency for Health Care and Social Development, Tomsk.
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2009 Aug;148(2):266-9
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Antiviral Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - virology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Immune System - drug effects
Immunoglobulin A - blood - metabolism
Immunoglobulin G - blood - metabolism
Interferon-gamma - blood
Interleukin-1beta - blood
Male
Respiratory Tract Infections - blood - drug therapy - metabolism - prevention & control
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Anaferon (pediatric formulation) reduces the incidence of acute respiratory viral infections in sickly children and children with bronchial asthma and has a positive effect on the course of asthma. The preparation produces an immunomodulating effect (increases initially low IFN-gamma levels and normalizes elevated levels of IL-1beta), stimulates synthesis of IgA and IgG, exhibits cytoprotective activity, and improves local immunity of the upper airways in sickly children.
PubMed ID
20027344 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.