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81 records – page 1 of 9.

Adverse events associated with high-dose ribavirin: evidence from the Toronto outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164482
Source
Pharmacotherapy. 2007 Apr;27(4):494-503
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Matthew P Muller
Linda Dresser
Janet Raboud
Allison McGeer
Elizabeth Rea
Susan E Richardson
Tony Mazzulli
Mark Loeb
Marie Louie
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mmuller@mtsinai.on.ca
Source
Pharmacotherapy. 2007 Apr;27(4):494-503
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - statistics & numerical data
Anemia - chemically induced
Antiviral Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Bradycardia - chemically induced
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Disease Outbreaks
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Magnesium Deficiency - chemically induced
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Ribavirin - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - drug therapy - epidemiology
Tetany - chemically induced
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To distinguish adverse events related to ribavirin therapy from those attributable to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and to determine the rate of potential ribavirin-related adverse events.
Retrospective cohort study.
Hospitals in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
A cohort of 306 patients with confirmed or probable SARS, 183 of whom received ribavirin and 123 of whom did not, between February 23, 2003, and July 1, 2003. Of the 183 treated patients, 155 (85%) received very high-dose ribavirin; the other 28 treated patients received lower-dose regimens.
Data on all patients with SARS admitted to hospitals in Toronto were abstracted from charts and electronic databases onto a standardized form by trained research nurses. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between ribavirin use and each adverse event (progressive anemia, hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia, bradycardia, transaminitis, and hyperamylasemia) after adjusting for SARS-related prognostic factors and corticosteroid use. In the primary logistic regression analysis, ribavirin use was strongly associated with anemia (odds ratio [OR] 3.0, 99% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-6.1, p
PubMed ID
17381375 View in PubMed
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[A/Fujian--a changeable influenza virus which may cause problems during winter]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30570
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Dec 11;100(50):4184-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-11-2003

[Antiviral chemoprophylaxis following sexual exposure to HIV]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7640
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Oct 19;160(43):6224-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-19-1998
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Oct 19;160(43):6224-5
Date
Oct-19-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antiviral Agents - administration & dosage
Denmark
Guidelines
HIV Infections - prevention & control - transmission
Humans
Sexual Behavior
PubMed ID
9803877 View in PubMed
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Beta-interferon protects multiple sclerosis patients against enhanced susceptibility to infections caused by poor air quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159289
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2008;30(1):13-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Mervi K Oikonen
Juha-Pekka Erälinna
Author Affiliation
Aerobiology Unit, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. mervi.oikonen@utu.fi
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2008;30(1):13-9
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenovirus Infections, Human - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Adult
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Antiviral Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Disease Susceptibility - epidemiology - immunology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Immunologic Factors - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects
Interferon-beta - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Male
Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting - drug therapy - epidemiology - immunology
Odds Ratio
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
The monthly multiple sclerosis relapse rate was studied from January 1995 to March 2001 from hospital records in Southwestern Finland as a retrospective open-label study.
The relapse rates of beta-interferon users and nonusers were compared to ambient air inhalable particle levels and viral infections in the population with logistic regression.
In the non-user group, relapses were more frequent 1 month following the episodes when PM(10) was in the highest quartile [logistic regression odds ratio = 1.196 (95% CI = 1.019-1.404), p = 0.028] and following adenovirus epidemics in the general population [logistic regression odds ratio = 2.234 (95% CI = 1.013-4.926), p = 0.046]. PM(10) and virus infections had no significant effects in interferon users.
In addition to being antiviral, interferon also protected multiple sclerosis patients against an enhanced susceptibility to infections caused by PM(10).
PubMed ID
18204292 View in PubMed
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CARESS: the Canadian registry of palivizumab.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136784
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2011 Aug;30(8):651-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Ian Mitchell
Bosco A Paes
Abby Li
Krista L Lanctôt
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2011 Aug;30(8):651-5
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Antiviral Agents - administration & dosage
Canada
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Prospective Studies
Registries
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - drug therapy - prevention & control
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Palivizumab is indicated for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) prophylaxis in high-risk children. However, relatively little is known about the current use, compliance, and outcomes associated with this medication.
A prospective, observational, registry based on 27 sites, with monthly follow-up of infants at high risk for RSV who received at least 1 dose of palivizumab during the 2005-2009 RSV seasons.
A total of 5286 children were enrolled (56.6% male; 71.7% white; average gestational age, 32.1 ± 5.5 weeks). Of them, 3741 patients (70.8%) were prophylaxed for prematurity only, 449 (8.5%) for bronchopulmonary dysplasia/chronic lung disease, 508 (9.6%) for congenital heart disease, and 588 (11.1%) for other reasons. Overall, 19,485 doses were given. On average, infants received 86.0% ± 28.4% of their expected number of injections; 71.2% of infants received their injections in the recommended time periods. Of the 5286 participants enrolled, 308 patients were hospitalized for respiratory tract illness (hospitalization rate, 5.8%). The RSV-hospitalization rate was calculated as 1.38%. Having siblings increased likelihood of hospitalization (66.9% vs. 55.7%, P
Notes
Comment In: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2012 Feb;31(2):212-3; author reply 21322252210
PubMed ID
21343842 View in PubMed
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A case of Crimean-congo hemorrhagic fever with pleural effusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90300
Source
Jpn J Infect Dis. 2009 Jan;62(1):70-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Tanir Gonul
Tuygun Nilden
Balaban Ismail
Doksöz Onder
Author Affiliation
Dr. Sami Ulus Children's Health and Diseases Training and Research Center, Ankara, Turkey. gonultanir58@yahoo.com
Source
Jpn J Infect Dis. 2009 Jan;62(1):70-2
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antiviral Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Child
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Hemorrhagic Fever Virus, Crimean-Congo - immunology - isolation & purification
Hemorrhagic Fever, Crimean - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Humans
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Male
Pleural Effusion - drug therapy - radiography - virology
Ribavirin - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Ticks - virology
Abstract
Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a tick-borne viral zoonosis with the potential of human-to-human transmission that affects wide areas in Asia, Southeastern Europe, and Africa. Hemorrhagic manifestations constitute a prominent symptom of late stage disease with case fatality rates from 3 to 50%. We present a case of CCHF complicated by hemorrhagic pleural effusion and resulting in resolution without chest tube drainage in a 9-year-old boy. The diagnosis of CCHF was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay tests. Both serum and pleural fluid CCHF IgM were positive at titers of 1/1,600 and 1/6,400, respectively.
PubMed ID
19168966 View in PubMed
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Changing costs and the impact on RSV prophylaxis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139217
Source
J Med Econ. 2010;13(4):705-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Kelly A Smart
Bosco A Paes
Krista L Lanctôt
Author Affiliation
Medical Outcomes and Research in Economics Group, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Med Econ. 2010;13(4):705-8
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage - economics
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Antiviral Agents - administration & dosage - economics
Canada
Chemoprevention
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Models, Economic
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - prevention & control
Abstract
Acquisition costs of palivizumab have increased in Canada since 2007. This analysis aims to re-evaluate the cost effectiveness of palivizumab in Canada for premature infants born between 32 and 35 weeks' gestational age using updated 2010 healthcare costs compared to those used in a 2007 decision analytic model.
New costs (CAN$) were acquired from the same Health Canada and Ontario Ministry of Health sources that were utilized in the previously published 2007 model. Palivizumab prices were acquired from Abbott Laboratories Ltd., current as of August 2010.
Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) rose by $742, going from $30,618/QALY to $31,360/QALY. ICER changes increased from a range of $801,297 to $820,701 for infants with zero risk factors to a decrease from $808 to $192 for infants with four or more risk factors.
Palivizumab ICERs remained fairly stable from 2007 to 2010. The original recommendation stating that palivizumab is cost effective in infants born between 32 and 35 weeks' GA with two or more risk factors, or who are at moderate-to-high risk based on a risk assessment model, does not change. Analyses founded on evolving country-specific variables are needed in order to accurately reassess the cost effectiveness of interventions as costs change worldwide.
There are a limited number of publications reporting mortality in premature Canadian infants with RSV as a primary outcome. In addition, conclusions drawn from this analysis are country-specific and limited to premature infants dwelling in Canada.
PubMed ID
21087075 View in PubMed
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[Clinical efficacy of arbidol (umifenovir) in the therapy of influenza in adults: preliminary results of the multicenter double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study ARBITR].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262333
Source
Ter Arkh. 2015;87(1):88-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
O I Kiselev
V V Maleev
É G Deeva
I A Leneva
E P Sel'kova
E A Osipova
A A Obukhov
S A Nadorov
E V Kulikova
Source
Ter Arkh. 2015;87(1):88-96
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antiviral Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Common Cold - drug therapy - virology
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Indoles - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Influenza, Human - drug therapy - virology
Male
Middle Aged
RNA, Viral - blood
Russia
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Arbidol (umifenovir) in adult patients with influenza.
The analysis of the preliminary results of the multicenter double-blind randomized placebo-controlled post-marketing study ARBITR was performed. A total of 293 adults aged 18 to 65 years with influenza or acute respiratory tract infection of no more than 36 hours' duration were enrolled in the study. Individuals were randomized into 2 treatment groups: oral umifenovir 200 mg four times daily for 5 days or placebo four times daily for 5 days. The efficacy endpoints were time to resolution of all symptoms, severity of symptoms and illness, durations of virus shedding.
The efficacy of umifenovir was evaluated in the group of 119 (40.6%) patients with influenza: 45 patients with laboratory-confirmed influenza and 74 patients whom diagnosis of influenza was made based on clinical and epidemiological data. Umifenovir had influence on the time to resolution of all symptoms. All symptoms were resolved within the first 60 hours after therapy initiation in 23.8% patients with laboratory-confirmed influenza in the umifenovir group and it was 5.7 times greater compared to placebo group (4.2%) (p
PubMed ID
25823275 View in PubMed
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Combined treatment with subcutaneous interferon-alpha, oral isoprinosine, and lamivudine for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31007
Source
J Child Neurol. 2003 Feb;18(2):104-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Omer Faruk Aydin
Nesrin Senbil
Necdet Kuyucu
Y K Yavuz Gürer
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Neurology, Dr. Sami Ulus Children's Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. ofaydin@yahoo.com
Source
J Child Neurol. 2003 Feb;18(2):104-8
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adolescent
Antiviral Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Humans
Infant
Injections, Subcutaneous
Inosine Pranobex - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Interferon Alfa-2a - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Lamivudine - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Male
Patient compliance
Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis - drug therapy - pathology
Survival
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We compared patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis who received treatment according to our protocol for at least 6 months (19 patients) with the patients who could not receive any treatment (13 patients). The treatment protocol consisted of oral isoprinosine (100 mg/kg/day), subcutaneous interferon alpha-2a (10 mU/m2/three times a week), and oral lamivudine (10 mg/kg/day). There were no statistical differences between the two groups according to Neurological Deficit Index, clinical stage, and average age on admission and also on the final evaluation after treatment. The mortality rates of both groups were similar: 3 (15.7%) for the treatment group and 6 (46%) for controls. The remission rates for the treatment and control groups were 7 of 19 (36.8%) and 0 of 13 (0%), respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (P = .036). The mean survival period of the treatment group was significantly longer than that of the control group (P = .01). In conclusion, this combination treatment protocol resulted in higher remission rates and longer survival periods when compared with controls, as well as a remission rate that was better than the spontaneous remission rate of 5%. For this reason, and as well as because interferon-alpha therapy has an easier route of application and a higher family compliance, we have considered this an alternative protocol for patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.
Notes
Comment In: J Child Neurol. 2004 Jun;19(6):463; author reply 463-415446398
PubMed ID
12693776 View in PubMed
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81 records – page 1 of 9.