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461 records – page 1 of 47.

1999-2000 influenza season: Canadian laboratory diagnoses and strain characterization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196284
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2000 Nov 15;26(22):185-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2000
Author
Y. Li
Author Affiliation
Respiratory Viruses Section, National Microbiology Laboratory, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Winnipeg, Man.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2000 Nov 15;26(22):185-9
Date
Nov-15-2000
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antiviral Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Influenza A virus - drug effects - isolation & purification
Influenza B virus - drug effects - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - drug therapy - epidemiology - virology
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Population Surveillance
PubMed ID
11131691 View in PubMed
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Adverse effects of amantadine and oseltamivir used during respiratory outbreaks in a center for developmentally disabled adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177196
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2004 Nov;25(11):955-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Allison J McGeer
Wayne Lee
Mark Loeb
Andrew E Simor
Margaret McArthur
Karen Green
Jonathan Hayfron Benjamin
Charles Gardner
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2004 Nov;25(11):955-61
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetamides - adverse effects
Adult
Aged
Amantadine - adverse effects
Antiviral Agents - adverse effects
Child
Comorbidity
Developmental Disabilities - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - chemically induced
Humans
Incidence
Infection Control - methods - statistics & numerical data
Long-Term Care - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nervous System Diseases - chemically induced
Ontario - epidemiology
Oseltamivir
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Antiviral prophylaxis is recommended for the control of institutional influenza A outbreaks. In long-term-care institutions other than nursing homes, neither the seriousness of influenza nor the risks and benefits of antiviral prophylaxis is clearly understood. We studied the severity of illness due to influenza among adults residing in a center for the developmentally disabled and assessed adverse reactions to amantadine and oseltamivir prophylaxis.
Data were collected from the charts of consenting residents. Complications of upper respiratory tract illness were recorded. Potential adverse events were documented during amantadine and oseltamivir therapy, and during a baseline period with neither medication.
The median age of the 287 participants was 46.4 years. Only 15 (5%) were older than 65 years, and 69 (24%) had chronic underlying medical illness placing them at high risk for influenza. Of the 122 residents with an upper respiratory tract infection, 16 (13%) developed pneumonia, 12 (9.8%) were hospitalized, and 5 (4%) died. Twenty-eight (25%) of 112 residents had an adverse neurologic event while receiving amantadine prophylaxis, compared with 3 (2.7%) receiving no antiviral medication and 5 (4.5%) receiving oseltamivir (P
PubMed ID
15566030 View in PubMed
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Adverse events associated with high-dose ribavirin: evidence from the Toronto outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164482
Source
Pharmacotherapy. 2007 Apr;27(4):494-503
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Matthew P Muller
Linda Dresser
Janet Raboud
Allison McGeer
Elizabeth Rea
Susan E Richardson
Tony Mazzulli
Mark Loeb
Marie Louie
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mmuller@mtsinai.on.ca
Source
Pharmacotherapy. 2007 Apr;27(4):494-503
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - statistics & numerical data
Anemia - chemically induced
Antiviral Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Bradycardia - chemically induced
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Disease Outbreaks
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Magnesium Deficiency - chemically induced
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Ribavirin - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - drug therapy - epidemiology
Tetany - chemically induced
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To distinguish adverse events related to ribavirin therapy from those attributable to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and to determine the rate of potential ribavirin-related adverse events.
Retrospective cohort study.
Hospitals in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
A cohort of 306 patients with confirmed or probable SARS, 183 of whom received ribavirin and 123 of whom did not, between February 23, 2003, and July 1, 2003. Of the 183 treated patients, 155 (85%) received very high-dose ribavirin; the other 28 treated patients received lower-dose regimens.
Data on all patients with SARS admitted to hospitals in Toronto were abstracted from charts and electronic databases onto a standardized form by trained research nurses. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between ribavirin use and each adverse event (progressive anemia, hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia, bradycardia, transaminitis, and hyperamylasemia) after adjusting for SARS-related prognostic factors and corticosteroid use. In the primary logistic regression analysis, ribavirin use was strongly associated with anemia (odds ratio [OR] 3.0, 99% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-6.1, p
PubMed ID
17381375 View in PubMed
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[A/Fujian--a changeable influenza virus which may cause problems during winter]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30570
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Dec 11;100(50):4184-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-11-2003

[A genetic analysis of A H1N1 pandemic influenza virus in the course of the epidemic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123359
Source
Ter Arkh. 2012;84(3):48-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Source
Ter Arkh. 2012;84(3):48-54
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amantadine - therapeutic use
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Drug Resistance, Viral - genetics
Genetic Testing
Genome, Viral - genetics
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - drug effects - genetics
Influenza, Human - drug therapy - epidemiology - genetics
Oseltamivir - therapeutic use
Pandemics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prognosis
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess genetic variability of A H1N1 pan influenza virus (IV) in the course of the epidemic and to detect a set of human nucleotide polymorphisms responsible for a severe course of the disease.
Extraction and purification of viral genomic RNA from the nasopharyngeal smears and genomic human DNA from the leukocytic fraction of venous blood was made in 230 patients from Moscow. Moscow and Sverdlovsk Regions with severe acute respirator, virus infection (ARVI). A flu virus type was established in amplification reaction with on-line detection of the products with application of primers recommended by WHO. Genetic polymorphisms of A H1N1 pan IV and human genes were determined with minisequencing reaction followed by detection of the products of MALDI-time-of-flight mass-spectrometry. Nucleotide sequences of the complete genome were revealed for 15 isolates of A H1N1 pan IV.
A H1N1 IV was identified in 77 cases (46 were pandemic, 31 seasonal). Mutations causing genetically determined resistance to adamants (amantadin, rimantadin) were detected in all 46 samples of genomic RNA of A H1N1 pan IV. Mutation leading to oseltamivir (tamiflu) resistance was found in one sample. It is shown that a severe course of A H1N1 pan IV infection is associated with genotypes predisposing to development of thromboses, bronchopulmonary diseases and hypertention. Genetic tests for prognosis of a complicated course of the flu are proposed. The revealed full-genome sequences of the segments of genomic RNA of 15 A H1N1 pan influenza viruses are deposited in GenBank.
We are the first in Russia to detect a mutant variant of A H1N1 pan IV resistant to oseltamivir We describe a set of nucleotide polymorphisms which determine a complicated course of the flu in patients with identified A H1N1 pan IV.
PubMed ID
22708423 View in PubMed
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[A hantavirus killed an Israeli researcher: hazards while working with wild animals].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258692
Source
Harefuah. 2014 Aug;153(8):443-4, 499
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Eitan Israeli
Source
Harefuah. 2014 Aug;153(8):443-4, 499
Date
Aug-2014
Language
Hebrew
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Disease Reservoirs
Disease Vectors
Finland - epidemiology
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points - methods
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome - mortality - physiopathology - prevention & control - virology
Humans
Mice
Puumala virus - pathogenicity
Rats
Research Personnel
Ribavirin - therapeutic use
Abstract
An Israeli researcher working in Finland with Bank Voles, contracted an infectious viral disease and died. This was a rare event, but it is important to learn about this class of viruses and to be aware of the hazards while working in the field in close contact with wild animals. The virus termed Puumala belongs to the genus Hanta from the Bunyaviridae family. The natural reservoir is rodents, mice, rats and Bank Votes for the Puuamala strain. The disease is termed HFRS (hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome), is prevalent in Asia and Europe, affecting 200,000 people a year, with 5-15% percent mortality (although in Finland mortality rate is 0.1%). The New World strains cause HPS (hemorrhagic pulmonary syndrome) affecting 200 people a year with 40% mortality. Virus is present in all rodents excretions, and route of infection is by aerosols, hand to mucus membranes contamination, by rodents bites and by contaminated food or water. More than 226 work related infections were documented. Treatment with Ribavirin helps in HFRS but not in HPS. The virus is stable in the environment for long periods, and research must be carried out at biosafety level 3. Working outdoors in rodent infested area, should be carried out using protective clothing, gloves, googles and face mask whenever aerosol producing tasks are performed. Both indoor and outdoor, it is important to adhere to self-hygienic procedures, especially hand washing.
PubMed ID
25286630 View in PubMed
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461 records – page 1 of 47.