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A 5-year follow-up study of adolescents who sought treatment for substance misuse in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107628
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 May;23(5):347-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Sheilagh Hodgins
Sara Lövenhag
Mattias Rehn
Kent W Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Maria-Ungdom Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 May;23(5):347-60
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Crime - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parents
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Previous studies have shown that substance misuse in adolescence is associated with increased risks of hospitalizations for mental and physical disorders, convictions for crimes, poverty, and premature death from age 21 to 50. The present study examined 180 adolescent boys and girls who sought treatment for substance misuse in Sweden. The adolescents and their parents were assessed independently when the adolescents first contacted the clinic to diagnose mental disorders and collect information on maltreatment and antisocial behavior. Official criminal files were obtained. Five years later, 147 of the ex-clients again completed similar assessments. The objectives were (1) to document the prevalence of alcohol use disorders (AUD) and drug use disorders (DUD) in early adulthood; and (2) to identify family and individual factors measured in adolescence that predicted these disorders, after taking account of AUD and DUD in adolescence and treatment. Results showed that AUD, DUD, and AUD + DUD present in mid-adolescence were in most cases also present in early adulthood. Prediction models detected no positive effect of treatment in limiting persistence of these disorders. Thus, treatment-as-usual provided by the only psychiatric service for adolescents with substance misuse in a large urban center in Sweden failed to prevent the persistence of substance misuse. Despite extensive clinical assessments of the ex-clients and their parents, few factors assessed in mid-adolescence were associated with substance misuse disorders 5 years later. It may be that family and individual factors in early life promote the mental disorders that precede adolescent substance misuse.
PubMed ID
23989597 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of legal outcome following pretrial forensic assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6875
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1994 Apr;39(3):161-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
J. Arboleda-Flórez
H L Holley
J. Williams
A. Crisanti
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Calgary General Hospital, Alberta.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1994 Apr;39(3):161-7
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Expert Testimony - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Insanity Defense - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient Care Team - legislation & jurisprudence
Referral and Consultation - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
This paper constitutes the first stage of data analysis in a larger controlled study designed to assess the effect of a forensic psychiatric assessment on legal disposition defined in three ways: 1. the number of days spent in custody prior to trial; 2. the number of sentenced days of incarceration; and 3. the conviction rate. A historical cohort design was used to follow two cohorts of individuals remanded, pretrial, to Southern Alberta Provincial Correctional Centres between 1988 and 1989. The study cohort consisted of all offenders detained who received a forensic psychiatric assessment. The comparison cohort consisted of a random sample of persons detained who did not undergo a forensic assessment. Because of small numbers, individuals below the age of 18 and women were excluded from study. This paper compares socio-legal characteristics of study and comparison subjects in order to better understand forensic psychiatric referral patterns and identify potentially confounding factors that would need to be controlled in subsequent analyses of legal outcomes. No differences were noted with respect to educational level but forensic subjects were found to be slightly older (average of 31 years compared to 29 years). Aboriginal peoples (Native Indian, Inuit and Metis) were three times more common among non-forensic offenders. Forensic patients were more likely to have had a prior forensic assessment but less likely to have a prior criminal detention. In addition, forensic patients were three times more likely to be charged with a crime against a person and counted more offenses in the target episode than comparison subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8033022 View in PubMed
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Antisocial process screening device: validation on a Russian sample of juvenile delinquents with the emphasis on the role of personality and parental rearing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155198
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2008 Oct-Nov;31(5):438-46
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marie Väfors Fritz
Vladislav Ruchkin
Roman Koposov
Britt Af Klinteberg
Author Affiliation
Stockholm University, Sweden.
Source
Int J Law Psychiatry. 2008 Oct-Nov;31(5):438-46
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - enzymology - epidemiology - psychology
Child Rearing
Comorbidity
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Memory
Parenting - psychology
Personality Assessment
Personality Inventory
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Russia - epidemiology
Violence
Abstract
The objectives of the present study were 1) to validate the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD) in a sample of Russian juvenile delinquents; 2) to examine subgroups of delinquents with higher versus lower levels of childhood problem behaviors with respect to the APSD subscales, personality traits, and parental rearing; and 3) to attempt to replicate the previous finding that the APSD subscale measuring callous/unemotional traits can differentiate subgroups of delinquents with different precursors for problem behaviors (predominantly biological versus predominantly social). A group of 250 Russian juvenile inmates (mean age=16.4) was examined by means of the APSD completed by the staff at the correctional institution. The inmates completed several self-reports assessing their current and childhood behavior problems, personality traits and experienced parental rearing practices. A factor structure of the APSD was obtained that is similar, albeit not identical, to that from the original studies by Frick and colleagues [Frick, P.J., O'Brien, B.S., Wootton, J.M., McBurnett, K., (1994). Psychopathy and conduct problems in children. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 103, 700-707]; [Frick, P.J., Barry, C.T., Bodin, S.D., (1999). Applying the concept of psychopathy to children: Implications for the Assessment of antisocial youth. In Gacono, C.B. (Ed), The clinical and forensic assessment of psychopathy: A practitioners guide. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum]; [Frick, P.J., Lilienfeld, S.O., Ellis, M., Loney, B., Silverthorn, P., (1999). The association between anxiety and psychopathy dimensions in children. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 27, 383-392]; callous unemotional traits in the present sample were expressed in manipulative behavior. Results further disclosed higher levels of antisocial and aggressive activities, higher levels of personality attributes such as narcissism and novelty seeking, as well as lower cooperativeness, and negatively perceived parental rearing in a subgroup with higher (versus lower) number of childhood symptoms of conduct disorder and oppositional disorder. The juvenile delinquents with higher levels as compared to lower levels of callous unemotional traits also perceived their parents as using more negative rearing strategies. The findings are discussed in terms of interactional processes between personality of the juvenile delinquents and parental rearing in the development of antisocial behavior.
PubMed ID
18790536 View in PubMed
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Borderline personality disorder in young Swedish suicides.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12057
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 1991 Mar;179(3):153-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
B. Runeson
J. Beskow
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 1991 Mar;179(3):153-6
Date
Mar-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Borderline Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Fifty-eight consecutive suicides committed between 1984 and 1987 by adolescents and young adults (ages 15 to 29 years) in an urban community were the subject of retrospective investigation through interviews with survivors and analyses of medical records. Classification in accordance with DSM-III-R showed a large proportion of axis II disorders. Borderline personality disorder (BPD) was found in 19 subjects (33%). When compared with subjects with other disorders, BPD subjects showed more antisocial traits and substance use disorders. Early parental absence, substance abuse in the homes, employment and financial problems, lack of a permanent residence, and sentence by court were also more frequent in BPD subjects.
PubMed ID
1997663 View in PubMed
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The childhood-onset neuropsychiatric background to adulthood psychopathic traits and personality disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9289
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2005 Mar-Apr;46(2):111-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Henrik Soderstrom
Thomas Nilsson
Anna-Kari Sjodin
Anita Carlstedt
Anders Forsman
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, 422 04 Hisings Backa, Sweden. henrik.soderstrom@rmv.se
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2005 Mar-Apr;46(2):111-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aggression - psychology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Asperger Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Autistic Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Bipolar Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Prisoners - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Offenses - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Statistics
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Childhood conduct disorder (CD) and adult psychopathic traits according to the Psychopathy Checklist Revised (PCL-R) were the closest psychiatric covariates to repeated violent crimes and aggression among offenders under forensic psychiatric investigation in Sweden. As psychopathy is not included in the present psychiatric diagnostic systems, we compared total and factor PCL-R scores to Axis I disorders, including childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorders, and to Axis II personality disorders, to establish the convergence of psychopathic traits with other psychiatric diagnoses, and to identify possible unique features. Psychopathic traits were positively correlated with bipolar mood disorder and negatively with unipolar depression. The total PCL-R scores as well as the Factor 2 (unemotionality) and Factor 3 (behavioral dyscontrol) scores were significantly correlated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Asperger's syndrome/high-functioning autistic traits, CD, substance abuse, and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Cluster B personality disorders. The interpersonal Factor 1 showed none of these correlations and may capture features that are specific to psychopathy, distinguishing core psychopathy from other diagnostic definitions.
PubMed ID
15723027 View in PubMed
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Childhood predictors of male criminality: a prospective population-based follow-up study from age 8 to late adolescence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169462
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 May;45(5):578-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Andre Sourander
Hendrik Elonheimo
Solja Niemela
Ari-Matti Nuutila
Hans Helenius
Louri Sillanmaki
Jorma Piha
Tuula Tamminen
Kirsti Kumpulainen
Irma Moilenen
Frederik Almqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. andre.sourander@utu.fi
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 May;45(5):578-86
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Crime - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Prospective Studies
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Single-Parent Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
To study childhood predictors for late adolescence criminality.
The follow-up sample included 2,713 Finnish boys born in 1981. Information about the 8-year-old boy' problem behavior was obtained from parents, teachers, and the children themselves. The follow-up information about criminal offenses was based on the national police register between the years 1998 and 2001 when the subjects were 16 to 20 years old.
According to the national police register, 22.2% of boys had at least one criminal offense other than a minor traffic violation during the 4-year study period. Living in nonintact family, low parental education level, parent reports of conduct problems, and teacher reports of hyperkinetic problems when the child was 8 independently predicted a high level (more than five) of offenses. Living in nonintact family at age 8 predicted all types of criminal offenses. Low parental education level and parent or teacher reports of conduct problems independently predicted violence, property, traffic, and drunk driving offenses. Teacher reports of hyperkinetic problems independently predicted all types of criminal offenses except drunk driving. Self-reports of bullying others independently predicted violent offenses.
Living in a broken home, low parental education level, conduct problems, and hyperactivity in middle childhood predict criminal offenses in late adolescence. Efforts to prevent later criminality already in childhood are emphasized.
PubMed ID
16670652 View in PubMed
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Children with symptoms of depression--what do the adults see?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205592
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1998 May;39(4):577-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
K. Puura
F. Almqvist
T. Tamminen
J. Piha
K. Kumpulainen
E. Räsänen
I. Moilanen
A M Koivisto
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, School of Medicine, Finland.
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1998 May;39(4):577-85
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
In order to find out whether parents and teachers report depressive symptoms in children with self-reported depression and which features are connected with sought psychiatric care, a sample of 5682 prepubertal children was assessed with the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), the Rutter A2 scale (RA) and Rutter B2 scale (RB). In stepwise regression analysis of parent report, depressed mood, unpopularity, social withdrawal, disobedience, inattentiveness, and stealing were associated with high CDI scores. The items of the teacher report associated with high CDI scores included poor school performance, restlessness, somatic complaints, unresponsiveness, being bullied, and absenteeism from school. Although the parents and teachers readily saw and reported depressive symptoms in children, only for a small minority of children with multiple depressive symptoms had psychiatric care been sought or even considered. The symptoms associated with sought psychiatric care for depressed children were somatic (soiling, asthma) and behavioural (disobedient, restless). The results indicate that a large number of children with multiple depressive symptoms are left without necessary psychiatric assessment and help.
PubMed ID
9599785 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Clinical criteria of the social danger of schizophrenic patients (psychopathlike states)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246303
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1980;80(1):107-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
V M Shumakov
E D Sokolova
Ia E Svirinovskii
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1980;80(1):107-14
Date
1980
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - epidemiology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Moscow
Paranoid Disorders - epidemiology
Psychopathology
Remission, Spontaneous
Risk
Schizophrenia - complications
Syndrome
Abstract
On the basis of an epidemiological multifactorial comparative study of schizphrenic patients who committed and did not commit socially dangerous acts, in several large administrative territories it was possible to detect a distinct correlation of different types of dangerous acts with clinical symptoms of the disease. The study contains a list of syndromes and their variants conjugated with different frequencies of dangerous acts. It was established that schizophrenic patients most frequently commit dangerous acts when there is a predominance of psychopathlike disorders in the clinical picture, mainly of a polymorphic and explosive character. It was demonstrated that this circumstance should be taken into consideration along with other factors, in a comprehensive assessment of the risk of a commitment of socially dangerous acts by patients.
PubMed ID
7355640 View in PubMed
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Comorbidity between depression and antisocial behaviour in middle adolescence: the role of perceived social support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143734
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 May 4;64(3):164-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-4-2010
Author
Minna Ritakallio
Tiina Luukkaala
Mauri Marttunen
Mirjami Pelkonen
Riittakerttu Kaltiala-Heino
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, Tampere School of Public Health, Tampere, Finland. minna.ritakallio@uta.fi
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 May 4;64(3):164-71
Date
May-4-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Social Support
Abstract
A sample of 3278 students (aged 15-16 years) were surveyed to investigate the interrelations between depression (RBDI; The Finnish modification of the 13-item Beck Depression Inventory), antisocial behaviour (YSR; Youth Self-Report) and perceived social support from family, friends and significant other (PSSS-R; the Perceived Social Support Scale-Revised). The study aimed especially to control for the effect of perceived social support in the comorbidity between depression and antisocial behaviour. The results indicate firstly that decreased perceived social support was associated with both depression and antisocial behaviour in both sexes. Similarly, antisocial behaviour was associated with depression in both sexes. Perceived social support modified comorbidity between depression and antisocial behaviour, but antisocial behaviour still remained independently associated with depression. Thus, perceived social support did not explain the found comorbidity between depression and antisocial behaviour.
PubMed ID
20446886 View in PubMed
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Conduct problems in Russian adolescents: the role of personality and parental rearing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194960
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2001 Mar;10(1):19-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
V V Ruchkin
R A Koposov
M. Eisemann
B. Hägglöf
Author Affiliation
Yale Child Study Center, Yale University Medical School, 230 South Frontage Road, New Haven, CT 06520-7900, USA.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2001 Mar;10(1):19-27
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child Rearing
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Parenting - psychology
Personality Inventory - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was 1) to assess the predictive value of conduct problems prior to the age of 12 for the severity of antisocial behaviour during adolescence, and 2) to investigate the relationships between personality traits/parental rearing and childhood conduct problems/teenage antisocial behaviour. A group of 193 delinquents was assessed by means of the Antisocial Behavior Checklist (ABC), the Retrospective Childhood Problems (RETROPROB), the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) and the EMBU questionnaire on parental rearing. The extreme groups of delinquents as defined by childhood conduct problems, differed significantly on the experience of a rejecting father and a self-directed character. Furthermore, some specific predictive patterns for current antisocial behaviour by childhood conduct disorder and both personality dimensions and parental rearing factors emerged. The findings are discussed in the light of the interactive nature of relations between personality and parental rearing in the development of antisocial behaviour among adolescents.
PubMed ID
11315532 View in PubMed
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44 records – page 1 of 5.