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A 2-year follow-up of involuntary admission's influence upon adherence and outcome in first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145997
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
S. Opjordsmoen
S. Friis
I. Melle
U. Haahr
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
J I Røssberg
B R Rund
E. Simonsen
P. Vaglum
T H McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål and Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway. o.s.e.ilner@medisin.uio.no
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To see, if voluntary admission for treatment in first-episode psychosis results in better adherence to treatment and more favourable outcome than involuntary admission.
We compared consecutively first-admitted, hospitalised patients from a voluntary (n = 91) with an involuntary (n = 126) group as to psychopathology and functioning using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning Scales at baseline, after 3 months and at 2 year follow-up. Moreover, duration of supportive psychotherapy, medication and number of hospitalisations during the 2 years were measured.
More women than men were admitted involuntarily. Voluntary patients had less psychopathology and better functioning than involuntary patients at baseline. No significant difference as to duration of psychotherapy and medication between groups was found. No significant difference was found as to psychopathology and functioning between voluntarily and involuntarily admitted patients at follow-up.
Legal admission status per se did not seem to influence treatment adherence and outcome.
PubMed ID
20085554 View in PubMed
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Source
Duodecim. 2000;116(18):2007-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
S. Mustajoki
Author Affiliation
Jorvin sairaala Turuntie 150, 02740 Espoo. sami.mustajoki@iki.fi
Source
Duodecim. 2000;116(18):2007-9
Date
2000
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Diabetic Neuropathies - complications
Electrocardiography - instrumentation
Equipment Failure
Haloperidol - therapeutic use
Hiccup - drug therapy - etiology
Humans
Male
PubMed ID
12017615 View in PubMed
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The adequacy of pharmaceutical treatment of schizophrenia in Quebec varies with age, but is not influenced by sex or neighbourhood deprivation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107816
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2013 Aug;58(8):456-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Frederieke M Brouwers
Josiane Courteau
Jean-Pierre Grégoire
Jocelyne Moisan
Sophie Lauzier
Alain Lesage
Marie-Josée Fleury
Alain Vanasse
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine and Emergency Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2013 Aug;58(8):456-65
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Though high discontinuation rates for antipsychotics (APs) by patients with schizophrenia are frequently reported, the percentage of patients receiving pharmaceutical treatment for schizophrenia in routine practice in accordance with international clinical guidelines is unknown. Further, it is unknown if these rates are influenced by levels of neighbourhood deprivation or by a patient's age or sex. Our study aims to investigate if inequalities in AP treatment could be observed between patients living in neighbourhoods with the highest levels of material and social deprivation and those with the lowest deprivation levels, between patients from different age groups, or between men and women.
We conducted a secondary analysis of medical-administrative data of a cohort of adult patients in the province of Quebec with a medical contact for schizophrenia in a 2-year period (2004-2005). We assessed the proportion of patients that filled at least 1 prescription for an AP and received adequate pharmaceutical treatment, defined as being in possession of APs at least 80% of the time as outpatients during a 2-year follow-up period.
Among the 30 544 study patients, 88.5% filled at least 1 prescription for an AP, and 67.5% of the treated patients received adequate treatment. Though no clinically significant differences were observed by deprivation or sex, younger age was associated with lower proportions of patients receiving adequate treatment (46% of treated patients aged between 18 and 29 years, compared with 72% aged between 30 and 64 years, and 77% aged 65 years and over).
In Quebec's routine practice, over 70% of treated patients aged 30 and over received adequate pharmacological treatment, regardless of sex or neighbourhood socioeconomic status. In contrast, in patients aged between 18 and 29 years this percentage was 47%. This is a discouraging finding, especially because optimal treatment in the early phase of disease is reported to result in the best long-term outcomes.
PubMed ID
23972107 View in PubMed
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Adequacy of treatment received by diagnosed and undiagnosed patients with bipolar I and II disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165274
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2007 Jan;68(1):102-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Petri Arvilommi
Kirsi S Suominen
Outi K Mantere
Sami Leppämäki
Hanna Valtonen
Erkki T Isometsä
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2007 Jan;68(1):102-10
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Bipolar Disorder - diagnosis - drug therapy
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To investigate the adequacy of pharmacotherapy received by psychiatric inpatients and outpatients with a research diagnosis of bipolar I or II disorder, including patients both with and without a clinical diagnosis of bipolar disorder.
In the Jorvi Bipolar Study (JoBS), 1630 psychiatric inpatients and outpatients in 3 Finnish cities were systematically screened between January 1, 2002, and February 28, 2003, for bipolar I and II disorders using the Mood Disorder Questionnaire. By using SCID-I and -II interviews, 191 patients were diagnosed with bipolar disorder (90 bipolar I and 101 bipolar II). Information was collected on clinical history, diagnosis, and treatment. The adequacy of treatment received was evaluated.
Of the 162 patients with previous bipolar disorder episodes, only 34 (20.9%) of all and 30 (55.5%) of those with a clinical diagnosis of bipolar disorder were using a mood stabilizer at onset of the index episode. Only 81 (42.4%) of all 191 patients and 76 (65.0%) of those diagnosed with bipolar disorder received adequate treatment for the acute index phase. The factor most strongly independently associated with adequate treatment was clinical diagnosis of bipolar disorder (OR = 25.34). In addition, rapid cycling (OR = 2.45), polyphasic index episode (OR = 2.41), or depressive index phase (OR = 3.36) independently predicted inadequate treatment. Outpatients received adequate treatment markedly less often than inpatients.
Clinical diagnosis of bipolar disorder is by far the most important prerequisite for adequate treatment. Problems in treatment are associated mostly with outpatient settings, where adequacy of treatment of bipolar depression is a major concern. Lack of attention to the longitudinal course of illness is another major problem area.
PubMed ID
17284137 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of Tourette syndrome and medication use in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234279
Source
Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 1988 Fall-Winter;12(3-4):251-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
W A Fulton
G A Shady
L M Champion
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, St. Boniface General Hospital, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 1988 Fall-Winter;12(3-4):251-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Haloperidol - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Pimozide - therapeutic use
Tourette Syndrome - drug therapy
Abstract
Self-report data were gathered from a national sample of over 200 Canadian Tourette Syndrome (TS) patients. Information regarding symptom severity both on and off medication was gathered along with an analysis of different medications in use, and patient ratings of effectiveness of those medications. Patients also rated their own mental health. Results indicated that approximately 60% of TS patients take some form of medication for relief from their symptoms. Of these, over 80% reported that symptoms are less severe when medicated. The most commonly prescribed medications in order of popularity are haloperidol, pimozide, clonidine and benztropine mesylate (Cogentin). Patient ratings of effectiveness of these medications places haloperidol first, pimozide second and clonidine third although all were found to be "somewhat" to "very" effective. Of those TS patients on medications, 50% rated their own mental health as good to excellent and 50% rated it as fair to poor.
PubMed ID
2906424 View in PubMed
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The antipsychotic agent quetiapine is increasingly not used as such: dispensed prescriptions in Norway 2004-2015.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291608
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2017 Sep; 73(9):1173-1179
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Pål Gjerden
Jørgen G Bramness
Ingunn Fride Tvete
Lars Slørdal
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Telemark Hospital, Skien, Norway. pal.gjerden@sthf.no.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2017 Sep; 73(9):1173-1179
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Databases, Factual
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Off-Label Use - statistics & numerical data
Quetiapine Fumarate - therapeutic use
Young Adult
Abstract
The antipsychotic agent quetiapine was introduced in Norway in 2003. We have assessed changes in dispensed prescriptions, including dosing, of quetiapine in Norway from 2004 to 2015.
Data on the sales of antipsychotics and antidepressants were drawn from the Norwegian Prescription Database. A total of 47,474 outpatients filled 195,622 prescriptions of quetiapine. Reimbursement codes, use of antipsychotics or antidepressants 12 months prior to the first prescription of quetiapine and estimated mean volume used measured as defined daily doses (DDDs) per day were used as proxies for diagnoses. We conducted a regression analysis with DDD per day as a function of possible explanatory variables.
The number of users filling at least two prescriptions of quetiapine per year increased from 584 in 2004 to 8506 in 2015 and the mean dose declined from 1.58 DDD per day (SD 8.00) to 0.48 DDD per day (SD 2.27). The latter is much lower than recommended for treatment of psychoses. In 2015, 60.1% of the 8506 quetiapine users did not seek reimbursement for the treatment of a major psychiatric disorder and only 2.6% of the patients were prescribed 1 DDD or more per day and reimbursed in accordance with the drug's primary indication, psychosis. A reported diagnosis of psychosis was not associated with higher quetiapine doses.
In 2015, the pattern of quetiapine dispensing in Norway most likely reflects predominant off-label use. This is unsettling considering poorly documented effects in non-psychotic disorders, profound side effects, significant toxicity and growing concern regarding abuse.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28623386 View in PubMed
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Antipsychotic drug--a study of the prescription pattern in a total sample of patients with a schizophrenic syndrome in one catchment area in the county of Uppland, Sweden, in 1991.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210433
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 1996 Dec;11(4):241-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
E. Lindström
B. Widerlöv
L. von Knorring
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 1996 Dec;11(4):241-6
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a total population of patients with a schizophrenic syndrome, the amount of antipsychotic drugs during a defined period was studied. Doses of antipsychotics were higher in males than in females, low to moderate in most patients, and decreased with the duration of illness. There was a significant negative correlation between antipsychotic dose and age at first admission. Compulsory treatment as well as the use of depot preparations were equally common in both sexes. In patients who had been compulsorily admitted, significantly higher doses of antipsychotics were used. The amount of antipsychotics prescribed to a single patient was best explained by the presence or absence of hallucinations and loose associations.
PubMed ID
9031990 View in PubMed
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[Antipsychotic drug therapy in schizophrenia--new guidelines. The Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare emphasizes the need for continuous treatment].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262421
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 Oct 1-7;111(40):1704-5
Publication Type
Article

Antipsychotic drug use and mortality in older adults with dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163191
Source
Ann Intern Med. 2007 Jun 5;146(11):775-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-2007
Author
Sudeep S Gill
Susan E Bronskill
Sharon-Lise T Normand
Geoffrey M Anderson
Kathy Sykora
Kelvin Lam
Chaim M Bell
Philip E Lee
Hadas D Fischer
Nathan Herrmann
Jerry H Gurwitz
Paula A Rochon
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Ann Intern Med. 2007 Jun 5;146(11):775-86
Date
Jun-5-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Dementia - drug therapy - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Ontario - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Time Factors
Abstract
Antipsychotic drugs are widely used to manage behavioral and psychological symptoms in dementia despite concerns about their safety.
To examine the association between treatment with antipsychotics (both conventional and atypical) and all-cause mortality.
Population-based, retrospective cohort study.
Ontario, Canada.
Older adults with dementia who were followed between 1 April 1997 and 31 March 2003.
The risk for death was determined at 30, 60, 120, and 180 days after the initial dispensing of antipsychotic medication. Two pairwise comparisons were made: atypical versus no antipsychotic use and conventional versus atypical antipsychotic use. Groups were stratified by place of residence (community or long-term care). Propensity score matching was used to adjust for differences in baseline health status.
A total of 27,259 matched pairs were identified. New use of atypical antipsychotics was associated with a statistically significant increase in the risk for death at 30 days compared with nonuse in both the community-dwelling cohort (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.31 [95% CI, 1.02 to 1.70]; absolute risk difference, 0.2 percentage point) and the long-term care cohort (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.55 [CI, 1.15 to 2.07]; absolute risk difference, 1.2 percentage points). Excess risk seemed to persist to 180 days, but unequal rates of censoring over time may have affected these results. Relative to atypical antipsychotic use, conventional antipsychotic use was associated with a higher risk for death at all time points. Sensitivity analysis revealed that unmeasured confounders that increase the risk for death could diminish or eliminate the observed associations.
Information on causes of death was not available. Many patients did not continue their initial treatments after 1 month of therapy. Unmeasured confounders could affect associations.
Atypical antipsychotic use is associated with an increased risk for death compared with nonuse among older adults with dementia. The risk for death may be greater with conventional antipsychotics than with atypical antipsychotics.
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Ment Health. 2008 May;11(2):5418441143
SummaryForPatientsIn: Ann Intern Med. 2007 Jun 5;146(11):I5217548405
PubMed ID
17548409 View in PubMed
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Antipsychotic Drug Use Is Not Associated With Long-Term Mortality Risk in Norwegian Nursing Home Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287422
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2016 May 01;17(5):464.e1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-01-2016
Author
Geir Selbæk
Dag Aarsland
Clive Ballard
Knut Engedal
Ellen Melbye Langballe
Jurate Ĺ altyte Benth
Sverre Bergh
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2016 May 01;17(5):464.e1-7
Date
May-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mortality - trends
Norway
Nursing Homes
Proportional Hazards Models
Abstract
To assess the long-term mortality risk associated with antipsychotic drug (AP) use in nursing homes.
A longitudinal study with 5 assessments over a 75-month follow-up period.
A representative sample of nursing home patients in 4 Norwegian counties.
At baseline, 1163 patients were included. At the last follow-up, 98 patients were still alive.
Prevalent drug use at each assessment was registered. Level of dementia, neuropsychiatric symptoms, level of functioning, medical health, and use of restraints were recorded at each assessment. A Cox regression model with time-dependent psychotropic drug use as the main predictor was estimated and adjusted for confounders.
In unadjusted Cox regression, a lower mortality risk was associated with the use of other psychotropic drugs, but not APs, compared with nonusers. In the adjusted analysis, neither use of APs nor other psychiatric drugs was associated with increased mortality risk. Higher age, male gender, not being married, medical disease burden, lower level of functioning, more severe degree of dementia, and a higher number of drugs were all associated with increased mortality risk.
In this long-term study of nursing home patients, AP drug use was not associated with increased risk of mortality. This is in line with results from earlier studies of clinical samples, but contrasts with results from randomized controlled trials and registry-based studies. The findings should be interpreted with caution. Taking into account the modest benefit and high risk of adverse effects of AP drug use, nonpharmacological treatment remains the first-line treatment approach.
PubMed ID
26935533 View in PubMed
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277 records – page 1 of 28.