Skip header and navigation

Refine By

276 records – page 1 of 28.

Exploring the variation in Ontario nursing home prescribing rates for antipsychotics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160238
Source
Healthc Q. 2007;10(4):20-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Paula A Rochon
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto. paula.rochon@utoronto.ca
Source
Healthc Q. 2007;10(4):20-2
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Nursing Homes
Ontario
PubMed ID
18027450 View in PubMed
Less detail

Neuroleptic treatment and other factors modifying cancer risk in schizophrenic patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234549
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1987 Nov;76(5):605
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1987

[Antipsychotic drug therapy in schizophrenia--new guidelines. The Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare emphasizes the need for continuous treatment].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262421
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 Oct 1-7;111(40):1704-5
Publication Type
Article

[New national guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia in Sweden].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299579
Source
Lakartidningen. 2019 01 28; 116:
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-28-2019
Author
Sofia von Malortie
Ellinor Cronqvist
Gunilla Ringbäck
Lena Flyckt
Karin Bodlund
Mussie Msghina
David Rosenberg
Thomas Davidson
Author Affiliation
Socialstyrelsen - Stockholm, Sweden Socialstyrelsen - Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2019 01 28; 116:
Date
01-28-2019
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Humans
Physician's Role
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Psychiatric Rehabilitation
Schizophrenia - therapy
Sweden
Abstract
Schizophrenia affects about 0.7 % of the population and is characterized by hallucinations, delusions and reduced functioning affecting the ability to study, work and socialize. Life expectancy for patients with schizophrenia is approximately 15-20 years shorter mostly due to cardiovascular disease. Stigmatization is  common despite the fact that it is a treatable disorder with a combination of medication and psychosocial interventions. Case management, psycho-education and supported employment are proven strategies, but less than half of individuals with schizophrenia are adequately treated. The National Board of Health and Welfare is currently launching updated National Guidelines (2018). The aim is to provide an overview of evidence-based interventions enabling patients with schizophrenia to live a fairly normal life. An evaluation has revealed that previous guidelines for antipsychotic medications have been satisfactorily implemented, but not those for psychosocial interventions. These will now be emphasized as »central recommendations« and will be followed up with specific indicators based on data from national registers.
PubMed ID
30694520 View in PubMed
Less detail

Long-term use of neuroleptics among elderly in a Swedish community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224293
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 1992 Mar;26(3):373-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
D G Isacson
K A Bingefors
K I Antonov
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Pharmacy, University of Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 1992 Mar;26(3):373-7
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Drug Utilization - trends
Female
Humans
Male
Sweden
Abstract
Analysis of long-term use of neuroleptics among the elderly in a Swedish community.
Cohort study, three-year follow-up period.
Primary care.
All people aged 65 years or older who used neuroleptics in 1984.
Neuroleptic use was fairly common among elderly and continued long-term use was relatively frequent. One third of long-term users obtained doses exceeding a recommended dosage range. Prescribed doses were seldom changed during the study period.
The high proportion of long-term users and the stability of the prescribed doses indicate that there is a need for more information to be made available to prescribes regarding the risks of long-term use of neuroleptics in primary care.
PubMed ID
1348194 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depot perphenazine decanoate and enanthate for schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49940
Source
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2000;(2):CD001717
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
S. Quraishi
A. David
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychological Medicine, Guy's, King's and St. Thomas' College School of Medicine, 103 Denmark Hill, London, UK, SE5 8AF. spjuasd@iop.kcl.ac.uk
Source
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2000;(2):CD001717
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Delayed-Action Preparations
Humans
Perphenazine - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Schizophrenia - drug therapy
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Anti-psychotic drugs are usually given orally but compliance with medication given by this route may be difficult to quantify. The development of depot injections in the 1960s gave rise to extensive use of depots as a means of long-term maintenance treatment. Perphenazine decanoate and enanthate are depot antipsychotics that belong to the phenothiazine family and have a piperazine ethanol side chain. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of depot perphenazine decanoate and enanthate versus placebo, oral anti-psychotics and other depot antipsychotic preparations for people with schizophrenia in terms of clinical, social and economic outcomes. SEARCH STRATEGY: Biological Abstracts (1982-1998), the Cochrane Library (Issue 2, 1998), the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Register (June 1998), EMBASE (1980-1998), MEDLINE (1966-1998), and PsycLIT (1974-1998) were searched. References of all identified trials were also inspected for more studies and industry contacted. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised clinical trials focusing on people with schizophrenia where depot perphenazine decanoate and enanthate, oral anti-psychotics or other depot preparations were compared. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Studies were reliably selected, quality rated and data extracted. For dichotomous data Peto odds ratios (OR) with the 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Where possible, the number needed to treat statistic (NNT) was calculated. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. MAIN RESULTS: One study of six months duration, compared perphenazine enanthate to clopenthixol decanoate. There was no differences between the two for outcomes of global improvement, relapse and leaving the study early. More people in the perphenazine enanthate group required anticholinergic drugs than those allocated to clopenthixol decanoate (OR 3.6 CI 1.2-10, NNT 10). A single study (n=64, duration six weeks) compared perphenazine enanthate and its longer acting decanoate ester. Data on relapse and leaving the study early failed to show convincing differences. The enanthate group, however, experienced more movement disorders (OR 0.2 CI 0.06-0.7) than those allocated the decanoate ester of the same drug (NNT 4.0) and required more anticholinergic drugs (OR 0.2 CI 0.08-0.7, NNT 3.7). REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: Depot perphenazine is in clinical use in the Nordic countries, Belgium, Portugal and the Netherlands. At a conservative estimate a quarter of a million people suffer from schizophrenia in those countries and could be treated with depot perphenazine. The total number of participants in the two trials with useful data is 236. Neither study observes the effect of oral versus depot antipsychotic drugs. Until well conducted and reported randomised trials are undertaken clinicians will be in doubt as to the effects of perphenazine depots and people with schizophrenia should exercise their own judgement or ask to be randomised.
Notes
UpdateIn: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2005;(3):CD00171716034865
PubMed ID
10796445 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Older antipsychotic drugs have proven to be equally effective with the newer treatments].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170907
Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(24):2617-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Raimo K R Salokangas
Author Affiliation
Turun yliopisto ja TYKS:n psykiatrian klinikka, Turku.
Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(24):2617-9
Date
2005
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy
Severity of Illness Index
PubMed ID
16454243 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk of death associated with the use of conventional versus atypical antipsychotic drugs among elderly patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164951
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Feb 27;176(5):627-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-27-2007
Author
Sebastian Schneeweiss
Soko Setoguchi
Alan Brookhart
Colin Dormuth
Philip S Wang
Author Affiliation
Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass 021205, USA. schneeweiss@post.harvard.edu
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Feb 27;176(5):627-32
Date
Feb-27-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mortality
Multivariate Analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Abstract
Public health advisories have warned that the use of atypical antipsychotic medications increases the risk of death among elderly patients. We assessed the short-term mortality in a population-based cohort of elderly people in British Columbia who were prescribed conventional and atypical antipsychotic medications.
We used linked health care utilization data of all BC residents to identify a cohort of people aged 65 years and older who began taking antipsychotic medications between January 1996 and December 2004 and were free of cancer. We compared the 180-day all-cause mortality between residents taking conventional antipsychotic medications and those taking atypical antipsychotic medications.
Of 37 241 elderly people in the study cohort, 12 882 were prescribed a conventional antipsychotic medication and 24 359 an atypical formulation. Within the first 180 days of use, 1822 patients (14.1%) in the conventional drug group died, compared with 2337 (9.6%) in the atypical drug group (mortality ratio 1.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.39-1.56). Multivariable adjustment resulted in a 180-day mortality ratio of 1.32 (1.23-1.42). In comparison with risperidone, haloperidol was associated with the greatest increase in mortality (mortality ratio 2.14, 95% CI 1.86-2.45) and loxapine the lowest (mortality ratio 1.29, 95% CI 1.19-1.40). The greatest increase in mortality occurred among people taking higher (above median) doses of conventional antipsychotic medications (mortality ratio 1.67, 95% CI 1.50-1.86) and during the first 40 days after the start of drug therapy (mortality ratio 1.60, 95% CI 1.42-1.80). Results were confirmed in propensity score analyses and instrumental variable estimation, minimizing residual confounding.
Among elderly patients, the risk of death associated with conventional antipsychotic medications is comparable to and possibly greater than the risk of death associated with atypical antipsychotic medications. Until further evidence is available, physicians should consider all antipsychotic medications to be equally risky in elderly patients.
Notes
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 1999;60 Suppl 23:29-3310625198
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2006 Nov;54(11):3390-817075817
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2001 Sep;16(9):900-611571771
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Nov 1;154(9):854-6411682368
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2002 Jan;159(1):103-811772697
Cites: J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2002 Apr;22(2):115-2011910255
Cites: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2002 Sep-Oct;10(5):609-1712213696
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2002 Oct 15;137(8):693-512379071
Cites: Clin Ther. 2002 Sep;24(9):1466-7612380638
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Aug 1;158(3):280-712882951
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Nov 1;158(9):915-2014585769
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2004;65 Suppl 2:5-99; discussion 100-102; quiz 103-414994733
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 2004;65 Suppl 11:5-1015264965
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1985 Sep;122(3):495-5064025298
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1993 Oct;46(10):1075-9; discussion 1081-908410092
Cites: JAMA. 1994 Sep 21;272(11):859-668078163
Cites: J Clin Psychiatry. 1999;60 Suppl 8:29-4110335669
Cites: Pharmacotherapy. 1999 Jul;19(7):811-2210417029
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2005 Apr;58(4):323-3715862718
Cites: JAMA. 2005 May 25;293(20):246215914734
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Jun 13;165(11):1280-515956008
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Aug 1;162(3):199-20015987728
Cites: JAMA. 2005 Oct 19;294(15):1934-4316234500
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 Dec 1;353(22):2335-4116319382
Cites: Epidemiology. 2006 May;17(3):268-7516617275
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 May;15(5):291-30316447304
Comment In: ACP J Club. 2007 Jul-Aug;147(1):2317608388
Erratum In: CMAJ. 2007 May 22;176(11):1613
PubMed ID
17325327 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depot perphenazine decanoate and enanthate for schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49590
Source
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2005;(3):CD001717
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
A. David
S. Quraishi
J. Rathbone
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychiatry and GKT School of Medicine, King's College School of Medicine and Dentistry, 103 Denmark Hill, London, UK, SE5 8AF. a.david@iop.kcl.ac.uk
Source
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2005;(3):CD001717
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Delayed-Action Preparations
Humans
Perphenazine - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Randomized Controlled Trials
Schizophrenia - drug therapy
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Antipsychotic drugs are usually given orally but compliance with medication given by this route may be difficult to quantify. The development of depot injections in the 1960s gave rise to extensive use of depots as a means of long-term maintenance treatment. Perphenazine decanoate and enanthate are depot antipsychotics that belong to the phenothiazine family and have a piperazine ethanol side chain. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of depot perphenazine decanoate and enanthate versus placebo, oral antipsychotics and other depot antipsychotic preparations for people with schizophrenia in terms of clinical, social and economic outcomes. SEARCH STRATEGY: We updated previous searches of the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Register (June 1998), Biological Abstracts (1982-1998), the Cochrane Library (Issue 2, 1998), EMBASE (1980-1998), MEDLINE (1966-1998), and PsycLIT (1974-1998) by searching the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Register (March 2004). References of all identified trials were also inspected for more studies and industry contacted. SELECTION CRITERIA: We compared randomised clinical trials focusing on people with schizophrenia where depot perphenazine decanoate and enanthate, oral antipsychotics or other depot preparations. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We reliably selected studies, quality rated them and extracted data. For dichotomous data we estimated the Relative Risk (RR) with the 95% confidence intervals (CI). Where possible, we calculated the number needed to treat statistic (NNT). Analysis was by intention-to-treat. MAIN RESULTS: Only four studies (Ahlfors 1980, Eufe 1979, Knudsen 1985c, Tegeler 1979), randomising a total 313 people could be included in this review and this combined with an overall lack of usable data limits any interpretation of results. Perphenazine enanthate was not significantly any better or worse than other depot antipsychotics in most of the main outcomes such as global state, relapse or leaving the study early. We found some differences favouring the control groups for adverse effects.One study (Ahlfors 1980) of six months' duration (n=172), compared perphenazine enanthate to clopenthixol decanoate. There were no differences between the two groups for outcomes of global improvement, relapse and leaving the study early. More people in the perphenazine enanthate group, however, required anticholinergic drugs than those allocated to clopenthixol decanoate (RR 1.12 CI 1.0 to 1.2, NNT 10).A single study (n=64, duration six weeks) compared perphenazine enanthate and its longer acting decanoate ester. Data on relapse and leaving the study early failed to show convincing differences. The enanthate group, however, experienced more movement disorders (RR 1.36, CI 1.1 to 1.8 NNT 5) than those allocated the decanoate ester of the same drug and required more anticholinergic drugs (RR 1.47 CI 1.1 to 2.0, NNT 4). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Depot perphenazine is in clinical use in the Nordic countries, Belgium, Portugal and the Netherlands. At a conservative estimate, a quarter of a million people suffer from schizophrenia in those countries and could be treated with depot perphenazine. The total number of participants in the four trials with useful data is 313. None of the studies observed the effects of oral versus depot antipsychotic drugs. Until well conducted and reported randomised trials are undertaken clinicians will be in doubt as to the effects of perphenazine depots and people with schizophrenia should exercise their own judgement or ask to be randomised.
Notes
UpdateOf: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2000;(2):CD00171710796445
PubMed ID
16034865 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Recommendations on the treatment of dementia. Secondary symptoms are often accessible for therapy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217740
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jul 13;91(28-29):2701-10
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Jul-13-1994

276 records – page 1 of 28.