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The 2004 Canadian recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part III--Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181497
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):55-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
R M Touyz
N. Campbell
A. Logan
N. Gledhill
R. Petrella
R. Padwal
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. touyzr@icrm.qc.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):55-9
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada
Diet
Dietary Supplements
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Humans
Hypertension - prevention & control - therapy
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Primary prevention - methods
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Societies, Medical
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations regarding the role of lifestyle modification in the treatment and prevention of hypertension.
Lifestyle modification interventions including exercise, weight reduction, alcohol consumption, dietary modification, intake of dietary cations and stress management are reviewed. Antioxidants and fish oil supplements are also reviewed, although specific recommendations cannot be made at present.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from January 2002 to September 2003 to update the 2001 recommendations for the management of hypertension. Supplemental searches in the Cochrane Collaboration databases were also performed. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently using prespecified levels of evidence by content and methodology experts.
Key recommendations include the following: lifestyle modification should be extended to nonhypertensive individuals who are at risk for developing high blood pressure; 30 min to 45 min of aerobic exercise should be performed on most days (four to five days) of the week; an ideal body weight (body mass index 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) should be maintained and weight loss strategies should use a multidisciplinary approach; alcohol consumption should be limited to two drinks or fewer per day, and weekly intake should not exceed 14 standard drinks for men and nine standard drinks for women; a reduced fat, low cholesterol diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low fat dairy products, and maintains an adequate intake of potassium, magnesium and calcium, should be followed; salt intake should be restricted to 65 mmol/day to 100 mmol/day in hypertensive individuals and less than 100 mmol/day in normotensive individuals at high risk for developing hypertension; and stress management should be considered as an intervention in selected individuals.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. Individuals with irreconcilable competing interests (declared by all members, compiled and circulated before the meeting) relative to any specific recommendation were excluded from voting on that recommendation. Only those recommendations achieving at least 70% consensus are reported here. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
PubMed ID
14968143 View in PubMed
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[Administration of essential phospholipids in persons exposed to chemical industrial pollutants].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180414
Source
Ter Arkh. 2004;76(2):63-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
L A Shpagina
S V Bobrov
Source
Ter Arkh. 2004;76(2):63-6
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Hazardous Substances - poisoning
Humans
Liver Function Tests
Occupational Diseases - drug therapy - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Phosphatidylcholines - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Poisoning - drug therapy - etiology
Russia
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To examine efficacy of the drug essliver-forte in patients with chronic intoxication by a complex of such toxicants as soluble and unsoluble compounds of uranium, lead and mercury.
The examination of bilirubin, synthesis of proteins and enzyme production by the liver, activity of free radical lipid oxidation and antioxidant defence was conducted in 42 persons (mean age 66.4 +/- 4.2 years) occupationally exposed to chemicals (compounds of uranium, lead and mercury) for 12.6 +/- 1.8 years. The patients were divided into two equal groups: patients of group 1 received standard therapy with enterosorbents, cerebral angioprotectors and alpha-tocopherol; patients of group 2 instead of alpha-tocopherol were given essliver-forte (2 capsules twice a day).
Patients of group 2 had significantly less frequent complaints for fatigue, anxiety, dyspnea, sleep disorders; improvement was observed in peripheral blood counts, in concentrations of alpha 2- and gamma-globulins, sulfhydril and catalase activity of erythrocytes; transaminase activity and intensity of saponin hemolysis went down.
Essliver-forte is effective in persons occupationally exposed to chemicals.
PubMed ID
15106419 View in PubMed
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Advances in pharmacological strategies for the prevention of cataract development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151401
Source
Indian J Ophthalmol. 2009 May-Jun;57(3):175-83
Publication Type
Article
Author
S K Gupta
V Kalai Selvan
S S Agrawal
Rohit Saxena
Author Affiliation
Delhi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research, Sector 3, Pushp Vihar, New Delhi-110 017, India. skgup@hotmail.com
Source
Indian J Ophthalmol. 2009 May-Jun;57(3):175-83
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aldehyde Reductase - antagonists & inhibitors
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Cataract - etiology - prevention & control
Glutathione - administration & dosage
Humans
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Risk factors
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
Cataractous-opacification of the lens is one of the leading causes of blindness in India. The situation can be managed by surgical removal of the cataractous lens. Various pharmacological strategies have been proposed for the prevention and treatment of cataract. Information on possible benefits of putative anticataract agents comes from a variety of approaches, ranging from laboratory experiments, both in vitro and in vivo , to epidemiological studies in patients. This review deals with the various mechanisms, and possible pharmacological interventions for the prevention of cataract. The article also reviews research on potential anticataractous agents, including aldose reductase inhibitors, glutathione boosters, antiglycating agents, vitamins and various drugs from indigenous sources.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19384010 View in PubMed
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Alcohol beverage drinking, diet and body mass index in a cross-sectional survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208609
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1997 May;51(5):326-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
S. Männistö
K. Uusitalo
E. Roos
M. Fogelholm
P. Pietinen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Nutrition, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1997 May;51(5):326-32
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Body mass index
Carotenoids - administration & dosage
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Educational Status
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Sex Characteristics
Smoking
Wine
Abstract
The study was carried out to determine the associations of alcohol beverage drinking with macronutrients, antioxidants, and body mass index.
Dietary subsample of the 1992 Finmonica cardiovascular risk factor survey in Finland; a cross-sectional study.
985 women and 863 men were drawn from the population register in the four monitoring areas. All subjects were 25-64 y of age.
The mailed questionnaire included questions covering socioeconomic factors, physical activity, smoking, and alcohol consumption. The diet was assessed using a three-day food record.
The dietary differences between abstainers and alcohol consumers were more significant than between consumers of different alcoholic beverages. Among drinkers, fat intake as a percentage of energy was higher and carbohydrate intake was lower than among abstainers. Those who preferred wine, however, had the highest vitamin C intake; female wine drinkers also had the highest carotenoid intake. With the exception of those who mainly preferred spirits, alcohol energy was not added to the diet but seemed to substitute food items both in men and women. Despite the similar total daily energy intakes, daily energy expenditure, and physical activity index, male drinkers were leaner than abstainers. In women, the proportion of underreporters of energy intake increased with increasing alcohol consumption, and the association between alcohol and body mass index was similar to that in men after the exclusion of underreporters.
Alcohol consumers were leaner than abstainers, and wine drinkers in particular had more antioxidants in their diet.
PubMed ID
9152684 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of efficacy of prevention and antioxidant therapy in premature infants].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116731
Source
Vestn Oftalmol. 2012 Nov-Dec;128(6):57-8, 60-1
Publication Type
Article
Author
G V Nikolaeva
M R Guseva
M B Beslaneeva
Source
Vestn Oftalmol. 2012 Nov-Dec;128(6):57-8, 60-1
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Instillation, Drug
Ophthalmic Solutions - administration & dosage
Retinopathy of Prematurity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
282 (564 eyes) premature infants born at mean 27 +/- 2,5 weeks of gestation with birth weight 914+/- 247g were enrolled in the study. Comparative study showed preventive treatment with histochrome in infants with risk of retinopathy of prematurity (RP) to decrease the incidence of RP compared to infants treated with emoxipine and no antioxidant therapy. Incidence of RP in infants preventively treated with combination antioxidant agents (dicynon and emoxipine) was significantly lower compared to the group without preventive antioxidant treatment. Use of histochrome in treatment of RP via periocular injections and forced instillations promoted more favorable outcome of the disease.
PubMed ID
23367765 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of some parameters of biological age and adaptation possibilities of workers of locomotive brigades].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123355
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2012;25(1):57-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
V A Nazimko
E V Morgul'
O A Petrova
R G Sheikhova
L S Kozina
M A Savenko
D S Lysenko
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2012;25(1):57-62
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological - drug effects
Aging, Premature - blood - etiology - genetics - prevention & control - psychology
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - metabolism - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Chromosome Aberrations - drug effects - statistics & numerical data
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Erythrocytes - drug effects - metabolism
Humans
Lipid Peroxides - blood
Lymphocytes - drug effects - metabolism
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Oligopeptides - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Phagocytosis - drug effects
Railroads
Russia
Abstract
The unfavorable factors of professional work of workers of locomotive brigades influence on speed of aging and adaptation possibilities of an organism. Analysis of the data obtained confirms the positive use of the peptide bioregulator Pinealon in maintenance the professional reliability of workers of locomotive brigades. Workers of locomotive brigades used preparation during two weeks (1 capsule containing 100 mkg of Pinealon 2 times a day). Pinealon application has improved parameters of biological age and indicators determining the effectiveness of adaptive reactions.
PubMed ID
22708445 View in PubMed
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[Anti-inflammatory effect of N-stearoylethanolamine in experimental burn injury in rats]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98804
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2009 Mar-Apr;81(2):107-16
Publication Type
Article
Author
N M Hula
A A Chumak
A H Berdyshev
O F Mehed'
T M Horid'ko
N L Kindruk
H V Kosiakova
O D Zhukov
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2009 Mar-Apr;81(2):107-16
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Cutaneous
Administration, Oral
Animals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Burns - drug therapy - enzymology - immunology - metabolism
Catalase - blood - metabolism
Disease Models, Animal
Erythrocytes - drug effects - enzymology - metabolism
Ethanolamines - administration & dosage - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Glutathione Reductase - blood - metabolism
Interleukin-6 - blood - immunology
Liver - drug effects - enzymology
Nitric Oxide Synthase - metabolism
Rats
Skin - drug effects - enzymology - injuries - metabolism
Spleen - drug effects - enzymology
Stearic Acids - administration & dosage - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Superoxide Dismutase - blood - metabolism
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - blood - immunology
Wound Healing - drug effects
Abstract
The biochemical mechanisms of anti-inflammatory effect of endocannabinoid congener N-stearoylethanolamine (NSE) was studied on the model of experimental burn in rats. The animals after the thermal burn of the skin received per os during 7 days the water suspension of NSE in a doze 10 mg/kg of body weight. In the other groups of rats the suspension was applied to the wound (the concentration of NSE was 10 mg/ml). It was shown for the first time that NSE accelerated the process of burn wound healing by the inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines (TNFalpha, IL-6) production. NSE caused the normalization of the iNOS and cNOS activity and of nitrite content in plasma, erythrocytes, liver and spleen of rats. NSE also modified the antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) activity and diminished the level of lipid peroxidation. The discovered anti-inflammatory NSE properties suggest the possibility of its usage for burn treatment.
PubMed ID
19873884 View in PubMed
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Antioxidant intake and allergic disease in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120524
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2012 Oct;42(10):1491-500
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
H. Rosenlund
J. Magnusson
I. Kull
N. Håkansson
A. Wolk
G. Pershagen
M. Wickman
A. Bergström
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Helen.Rosenlund@ki.se
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2012 Oct;42(10):1491-500
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Cohort Studies
Diet
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Magnesium - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Male
Questionnaires
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
alpha-Tocopherol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
beta Carotene - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Abstract
Antioxidant intake may reduce the risk of allergic disease by protecting against oxidative tissue damage. Major sources of antioxidants in the Western world are fruits, vegetables (vitamin C, ß-carotene, a-tocopherol), meat and milk (selenium, magnesium, zinc). Children may exclude or eat less of some fruits and vegetables due to cross-reactivity between pollen and these foods, complicating assessment of causal relationships.
To investigate the association between dietary antioxidant intake and allergic disease, taking potential reverse causation into account.
Data on 2442 8-year-old children from the Swedish birth cohort study BAMSE were analysed. Children with completed parental questionnaires on exposures and health, including a food-frequency questionnaire and who provided a blood sample were included. Associations between antioxidant intake during the past year and current allergic disease were analysed using logistic regression.
An inverse association was observed between intake of ß-carotene and rhinitis (OR(adj), highest vs. lowest quartile, 0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.93). Magnesium intake was inversely related to asthma (OR(adj), 0.65, 95% CI 0.42-1.00) and atopic sensitisation (OR(adj), 0.78, 95% CI 0.61-1.00). Following exclusion of children who avoided certain fruits, vegetables or milk due to allergic symptoms (n = 285), the inverse association remained between magnesium intake and asthma (OR(adj), 0.58, 95% CI 0.35-0.98), whereas all other associations became non-significant.
Diet modifications due to allergy may affect the antioxidant intake and needs to be considered when investigating the relationship between diet and allergic disease. Magnesium intake seems to have a protective effect on childhood asthma.
Notes
Comment In: Clin Exp Allergy. 2012 Oct;42(10):1420-222994339
PubMed ID
22994346 View in PubMed
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Antioxidant intake, oxidative stress and inflammation among immigrant women from the Middle East living in Sweden: associations with cardiovascular risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84865
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2007 Dec;17(10):748-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Daryani Achraf
Basu Samar
Becker Wulf
Larsson Anders
Risérus Ulf
Author Affiliation
Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala Science Park, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. achraf.daryani@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2007 Dec;17(10):748-56
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Blood Pressure - physiology
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Emigration and Immigration
F2-Isoprostanes - blood
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Iran - ethnology
Middle Aged
Oxidative Stress
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Immigrant women from the Middle East have higher cardiovascular risk compared to native women. Whether low antioxidant intake, oxidative stress or inflammation contributes to risk is unknown. In a cross-sectional study of 157 randomly selected foreign-born women (Iranian and Turkish) and native women living in Sweden, we investigated antioxidant status, oxidative stress (F(2)-isoprostanes) and systemic inflammation (plasma high sensitive C-reactive protein; CRP) markers. We also investigated relationships between F(2)-isoprostanes, CRP and cardiovascular risk factors. METHODS AND RESULT: Dietary intake was assessed using 24-h dietary recalls repeated four times. Micronutrient intake was not consistently different between groups. Serum alpha-tocopherol, but not gamma-tocopherol levels, was lower in Turkish vs. Swedish women (P0.21, P values
PubMed ID
17145175 View in PubMed
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Antioxidant-rich food intakes and their association with blood total antioxidant status and vitamin C and E levels in community-dwelling seniors from the Quebec longitudinal study NuAge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137105
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2011 Jun;46(6):475-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Abdelouahed Khalil
Pierrette Gaudreau
Mounia Cherki
Richard Wagner
Daniel M Tessier
Tamas Fulop
Bryna Shatenstein
Author Affiliation
Research Centre on Aging, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada. abdelouahed.khalil@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2011 Jun;46(6):475-81
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - metabolism
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - metabolism
Ascorbic Acid - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eating
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Quebec
Reactive Oxygen Species - metabolism
Vitamin E - blood
Abstract
A cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the association between current consumption of a series of 26 common antioxidant-rich foods (ARF) with serum total antioxidant status (TAS) and plasma vitamin C and E levels in community-dwelling older adults. A convenience sample of the first 94 non-smoking Caucasian men (54%) and women (46%) enrolled in the Quebec Longitudinal Study NuAge were selected. The "Functional Foods Consumption Frequency Questionnaire" (FFCFQ) was administered at recruitment (T1) to ascertain patterns of consumption of ARF over the lifetime. The total Oxygen Radical Antioxidant Capacity (ORAC) of 25 ARF reported by subjects was estimated using published values. Serum TAS was determined based on the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assay while plasma vitamins C and E (a- and ?-tocopherol) levels were analyzed by HPLC. The numbers of ARF eaten daily at T1, estimated from the FFCFQ and calculated from the diet recalls, were significantly correlated (r=0.51, P
PubMed ID
21316439 View in PubMed
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96 records – page 1 of 10.