Skip header and navigation

Refine By

416 records – page 1 of 42.

A 15-year analysis of early and late autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant in relapsed, aggressive, transformed, and nontransformed follicular lymphoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162371
Source
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2007 Aug;13(8):956-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Mitchell Sabloff
Harold L Atkins
Isabelle Bence-Bruckler
Christopher Bredeson
Dean Fergusson
Paul Genest
Harry Hopkins
Brian Hutton
Sheryl Mcdiarmid
Lothar B Huebsch
Author Affiliation
The Ottawa Hospital Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. msabloff@ottawahospital.on.ca
Source
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2007 Aug;13(8):956-64
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation - adverse effects - methods
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Lymphoma, Follicular - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - therapy
Ontario
Retrospective Studies
Salvage Therapy - methods
Transplantation, Autologous - methods
Abstract
Autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) has been shown to be an effective treatment for follicular lymphoma (FL). We explored our experience in ASCT for FL among all patients treated over a 15-year period from diagnosis through their entire treatment history including relapse post ASCT. All patients who underwent an unpurged ASCT for relapsed, advanced FL between June 1990 and December 2000 were analyzed. After salvage therapy they received melphalan/etoposide/total body irradiation, BCNU, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan (BEAM), or cyclophosphamide BCNU etoposide (CBV) as conditioning for the ASCT. One hundred thirty-eight patients with a median age of 48 years and a median follow-up of 7.6 years were analyzed. The majority were of the subtype grade 1, nontransformed (FL-NT), having had 1 prior chemotherapy. The progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of the FL-NT at 10 years were 46% and 57%, respectively, and at 5 years for the transformed (FL-T) were 25% and 56%, respectively, of which only the PFS was significantly different (P=.007). The median OS from diagnosis was 16 years for the FL-NT. ASCT positively altered the trend of shorter remissions with subsequent chemotherapies, and there was no difference in OS between those who had 1, 2, or >2 chemotherapies prior to ASCT. Salvage therapy for relapse post ASCT was effective (OS>1 year) in a third of patients. Unpurged ASCT is an effective tool in the treatment of relapsed, aggressive FL-NT and FL-T, is superior to retreatment with standard chemotherapy, is effective at various stages of treatment, is likely to have a beneficial influence on the natural history of this disease, and the disease is amenable to salvage therapy post-ASCT relapse.
PubMed ID
17640600 View in PubMed
Less detail

(18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography after one cycle of chemotherapy in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: results of a Nordic/US intergroup study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272653
Source
Leuk Lymphoma. 2015 Jul;56(7):2005-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Karen Juul Mylam
Lale Kostakoglu
Martin Hutchings
Morton Coleman
Dominick Lamonica
Myron S Czuczman
Louis F Diehl
Anne L Nielsen
Paw Jensen
Annika Loft
Helle W Hendel
Victor Iyer
Sirpa Leppä
Sirkku Jyrkkiö
Harald Holte
Mikael Eriksson
Dorte Gillstrøm
Per B Hansen
Marko Seppänen
Karin Hjorthaug
Peter de Nully Brown
Lars M Pedersen
Source
Leuk Lymphoma. 2015 Jul;56(7):2005-12
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Denmark
Female
Finland
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - pharmacokinetics
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse - drug therapy - mortality - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Multimodal Imaging
Neoplasm Staging
Norway
Positron-Emission Tomography - methods
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Radiopharmaceuticals - pharmacokinetics
Survival Rate
Sweden
Tissue Distribution
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
We evaluated the predictive value of interim positon emission tomography (I-PET) after one course of chemoimmunotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). One hundred and twelve patients with DLBCL were enrolled. All patients had PET/computed tomography (CT) scans performed after one course of chemotherapy (PET-1). I-PET scans were categorized according to International Harmonization Project criteria (IHP), Deauville 5-point scale (D 5PS) with scores 1-3 considered negative (D 5PS > 3) and D 5PS with scores 1-4 considered negative (D 5PS = 5). Ratios of tumor maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) to liver SUVmax were also analyzed. We found no difference in progression-free survival (PFS) between PET-negative and PET-positive patients according to IHP and D 5PS > 3. The 2-year PFS using D 5PS = 5 was 50.9% in the PET-positive group and 84.8% in the PET-negative group (p = 0.002). A tumor/liver SUVmax cut-off of 3.1 to distinguish D 5PS scores of 4 and 5 provided the best prognostic value. PET after one course of chemotherapy was not able to safely discriminate PET-positive and PET-negative patients in different prognostic groups.
PubMed ID
25330442 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aclarubicin plus cytosine arabinoside versus daunorubicin plus cytosine arabinoside in previously untreated patients with acute myeloid leukemia: a Danish national phase III trial. The Danish Society of Hematology Study Group on AML, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24824
Source
Leukemia. 1991 Jun;5(6):510-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
O P Hansen
J. Pedersen-Bjergaard
J. Ellegaard
H. Brincker
A M Boesen
B E Christensen
A. Drivsholm
E. Hippe
H. Jans
K B Jensen
Author Affiliation
Finsen Institute-Rigshospitalet, Department of Hematology L, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Leukemia. 1991 Jun;5(6):510-6
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aclarubicin - administration & dosage
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Amsacrine - administration & dosage
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Comparative Study
Cytarabine - administration & dosage
Daunorubicin - administration & dosage
Denmark
Drug Administration Schedule
Etoposide - administration & dosage
Humans
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - drug therapy - mortality
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Remission Induction
Survival Rate
Abstract
A regimen of aclarubicin (ACR) of 75 mg/m2 daily for 3 days plus a continuous intravenous infusion of cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) of 100 mg/m2 per day for 7 days was compared with daunorubicin (DNR) 45 mg/m2/day for 3 days plus ara-C for 7 days as first-line chemotherapy of de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a randomized, nationwide Danish study. A total of 180 patients aged between 17 and 65 years were entered onto the protocol. Patients who achieved complete remission (CR) were given five courses of intensive consolidation therapy consisting of two courses of high dose ara-C, two courses of amsacrine plus etoposide, and one course of DNR plus ara-C. Of 174 evaluable patients, 99 achieved CR. The rate of CR was significantly higher on ACR plus ara-C than on DNR plus ara-C [66% versus 50% (p = 0.043)] and decreased significantly with increasing age. The hematological toxicity was identical for the two regimens. A total of 83 patients entered consolidation therapy. At 4 years, 37% of patients with CR following ACR were still in remission compared with 33% following DNR (p = 0.48), and the total survival at 4 years was 29% versus 20% (p = 0.26). The duration of remission and total survival both decreased with increasing age. ACR plus ara-C seem at least as good or better than DNR plus ara-C as first-line chemotherapy of AML.
PubMed ID
2056774 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute leukemia in middle Norway 1984-88.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23471
Source
Leuk Lymphoma. 1994 Dec;16(1-2):65-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
J. Lamvik
I. Dybedal
J. Hammerstrøm
A. Waage
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Trondheim University Hospital, Norway.
Source
Leuk Lymphoma. 1994 Dec;16(1-2):65-71
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Leukemia, Myeloid - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
One hundred and eight adult patients with acute leukemia were diagnosed in the middle Norwegian health region during the 5-year period 1984-88, giving an incidence rate of 4.6/100,000 per year. Nine patients had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 93 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 6 patients acute leukemia without definite sub-classification. The median age of AML patients was 66 years. Thirty-five patients (median age 78 years) were found non-suitable for cytotoxic drugs, while 58 AML patients (median age 57 years) were given aplasia-inducing drug combinations according to one of three treatment programs depending on the time of diagnosis and age, in order to induce remission. Six patients were given oral drugs or low dose ara-C. All patients were followed until death or for an observation time of more than 5 years (median 7 years). The overall long term survival was found to be 12/108 for all acute leukemias, 8/93 for AML patients and 4/9 for ALL patients. For the AML patients given intravenous aplasia-inducing drugs the remission rate was 0.65, the median remission duration 12.2 months and the 5-year survival rate 0.19. For 31 AML patients, (median age 41 years), started on an intensive chemotherapy program, the 5-year survival rate was 0.32 and the relapse-free 5-year survival rate for the 22 patients entering complete remission was also 0.32.
PubMed ID
7696933 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in adults in Sweden 1977-84: a retrospective analysis. Swedish ALL-Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25479
Source
Eur J Haematol. 1989 Aug;43(2):167-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1989
Author
B. Smedmyr
B. Simonsson
C. Sundström
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Haematol. 1989 Aug;43(2):167-72
Date
Aug-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L2 - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
The present study is a retrospective analysis of the outcome in 210 patients diagnosed and treated as having acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in Sweden during 1977-84. 131 patients were morphologically rediagnosed as ALL. For the ALL-patients, nine different remission induction regimens were used. Remission frequency was 69%, without statistical difference according to induction treatment. However, the reasons for remission failure differed among therapy groups. The number of responders was significantly higher among patients who received a remission induction therapy with an anthracycline and/or L-asparaginase. Maintenance therapy consisted in most cases of 6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate with reinduction courses for 2-3 years. Median survival time was 13 months and median duration of first remission (MRD) 11 months. For a subgroup of patients (n = 29) treated with the most intense remission induction regimens, including at least 4 cytostatic drugs with both an anthracyclilne and L-asparaginase, the MRD is not yet reached, the shortest follow up time is 43 + months, and the probability of remaining in complete remission is 66%. We conclude that aggressive cytostatic therapy, with induction regimens including both an anthracycline and L-asparaginase, may cure a considerable number of adult ALL-patients.
PubMed ID
2792324 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemia in adults. The course of the disease in 315 patients from one region, during a ten-year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25553
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1989 Apr;36(2):189-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1989
Author
H E Johnsen
O J Bergmann
J. Ellegaard
P. Bastrup-Madsen
Author Affiliation
University Department of Medicine and Hematology, Aarhus Amtssygehus, Denmark.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1989 Apr;36(2):189-93
Date
Apr-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Child
Denmark
Female
Humans
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute - drug therapy - mortality
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - drug therapy - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Recurrence
Remission Induction - methods
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In a ten-year retrospective singlecenter study of a nonselected patient population, we describe our experience with an unchanged chemotherapy regimen for 264 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 51 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In the AML group, 85 patients could not receive specific antileukemic treatment because of uncontrollable bleeding, infection or organ failure, but 179 were fit for remission-induction therapy with cytarabine and daunorubicin, resulting in complete remission in 79 patients. During treatment, 54 patients died of resistant disease or complications. The median duration of survival of the patients in complete remission was 18-24 months (n = 79) compared with 1-2 months for patients in partial or no remission (n = 100). As maintenance chemotherapy, thioguanine, cytarabine and daunorubicin were given for one year. In the ALL group 50 of 51 patients received remission-induction therapy with vincristine, prednisone and Adriablastin, resulting in complete remission in 39 of the patients. The median duration of survival of the patients in complete remission was nine months (n = 39) compared with 2-3 months for patients not in remission (n = 12). Central nervous system prophylaxis with intraspinal methotrexate and cranial irradiation was given, followed by methotrexate and Purinetol for three years as maintenance chemotherapy. The remission rate for AML and adult ALL was 44% and 78%, respectively. The major Cause of death after first complete remission was leukemic relapse in boths groups, with a median survival time after relapse of 3-4 months for 48 AML and six months for 30 ALL patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2707057 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addition of etoposide to CHOP chemotherapy in untreated patients with high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21322
Source
Ann Oncol. 1998 Nov;9(11):1213-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
F. Celsing
S. Widell
K. Merk
P. Bernell
G. Grimfors
A. Hedlund
J. Liliemark
E. Svedmyr
E. Osby
M. Björkholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Hematology and Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Ann Oncol. 1998 Nov;9(11):1213-7
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Cyclophosphamide - administration & dosage
Doxorubicin - administration & dosage
Etoposide - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Lymphoma, High-Grade - drug therapy - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Prednisone - administration & dosage
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Vincristine - administration & dosage
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Second- and third-generation chemotherapy protocols for the treatment of aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) have considerable, and age-related, toxic effects. In addition, they do not seem to prolong overall survival in comparison to standard CHOP chemotherapy. In this phase II study we investigated the feasibility and efficacy of the addition of etoposide to the conventional CHOP regimen. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Toxicity and clinical efficacy were determined in 132 patients with previously untreated high-grade NHL. There were 51 patients in clinical stage I and II and 81 patients in stage III and IV, with a median age of 54 years (range 17-85). Patients received standard-dose CHOP plus etoposide 100 mg/m2 i.v. on day 1 and 200 mg/m2 p.o. on days 2-3. RESULTS: The overall response rate was 84%, with 70% complete and 14% partial responses. The predicted three- and five-year survivals for the group as a whole were 60% and 53%, respectively, and the corresponding disease-free survivals for patients achieving complete remissions were 65% and 56%, respectively. Outcome was not different from that of CHOP-treated patients in a recently completed Nordic study performed during the same time period. Myelosuppression (WHO grade 3-4), observed in 87% of patients and infectious complications (WHO grade 3-4) in 33%, dominated the toxicity profile of this regimen. Fifty-seven of 92 complete responders (62%) received 6-8 CHOP-E cycles with no reductions in planned dose intensity. LDH level higher than normal, extranodal sites = 2, stage III-IV at diagnosis were all indicators of a poor survival. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that CHOP-E treatment is effective in high-grade NHL. However, mainly due to severe myelosuppression frequent schedule modifications were required and the results are not obviously superior to those of conventional CHOP.
PubMed ID
9862052 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addition of sunitinib to cetuximab and irinotecan in patients with heavily pre-treated advanced colorectal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142304
Source
Acta Oncol. 2010 Aug;49(6):833-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Camilla Qvortrup
Benny Vittrup Jensen
Trine Lembrecht Jorgensen
Dorte Nielsen
Jon Kroll Bjerregaard
Per Pfeiffer
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. Camilla.qvortrup@ouh.regionsyddanmark.dk
Source
Acta Oncol. 2010 Aug;49(6):833-6
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Camptothecin - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Colorectal Neoplasms - drug therapy - pathology
Compassionate Use Trials
Denmark
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Humans
Indoles - administration & dosage
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Organoplatinum Compounds - administration & dosage
Pyrroles - administration & dosage
Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases - antagonists & inhibitors
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Results of continuous sunitinib, in combination with cetuximab and irinotecan every other week (SIC) for compassionate use in heavily pre-treated patients with mCRC are presented.
Patients with mCRC resistant to oxaliplatin, irinotecan, 5-FU and cetuximab received SIC at two Danish oncologic departments. The regimen consisted of sunitinib given as a continuous-dosing in combination with cetuximab and irinotecan every other week (CetIri). The first six patients started with a daily oral dose of sunitinib of 12.5 mg. Subsequent patients started at a daily dose of 25 mg with the possibility to escalate to 37.5 mg.
Twenty-nine patients received SIC. No patient had an objective response, but 13 patients had subjective relief and 42% had stable disease. The median time to progression was 3.2 months and median overall survival was 7.4 months. Fatigue and leukopenia were the most frequently reported severe adverse event (18% grade 3 and 18% grade 3/4, respectively).
Sunitinib continuous-dosing with 25 mg/day can safely be combined with CetIri administered every other week.
PubMed ID
20615171 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adjuvant capecitabine, docetaxel, cyclophosphamide, and epirubicin for early breast cancer: final analysis of the randomized FinXX trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129460
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2012 Jan 1;30(1):11-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2012
Author
Heikki Joensuu
Pirkko-Liisa Kellokumpu-Lehtinen
Riikka Huovinen
Arja Jukkola-Vuorinen
Minna Tanner
Riitta Kokko
Johan Ahlgren
Päivi Auvinen
Outi Paija
Leena Helle
Kenneth Villman
Paul Nyandoto
Greger Nilsson
Marjo Pajunen
Raija Asola
Paula Poikonen
Mika Leinonen
Vesa Kataja
Petri Bono
Henrik Lindman
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Haartmaninkatu 4, PO Box 180, FIN-00029 Helsinki, Finland. heikki.joensuu@hus.fi
Source
J Clin Oncol. 2012 Jan 1;30(1):11-8
Date
Jan-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antimetabolites, Antineoplastic - administration & dosage
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Breast Neoplasms - chemistry - drug therapy - mortality - pathology - surgery
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast - drug therapy - pathology
Carcinoma, Lobular - drug therapy - pathology
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Cyclophosphamide - administration & dosage
Deoxycytidine - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Disease-Free Survival
Drug Administration Schedule
Epirubicin - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Fluorouracil - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lymphatic Metastasis
Mastectomy - methods
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Grading
Neoplasm Staging
Prospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Taxoids - administration & dosage
Treatment Outcome
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis
Abstract
Capecitabine is an active agent in the treatment of breast cancer. It is not known whether integration of capecitabine into an adjuvant regimen that contains a taxane, an anthracycline, and cyclophosphamide improves outcome in early breast cancer.
Women with axillary node-positive or high-risk node-negative breast cancer were randomly assigned to receive either three cycles of docetaxel and capecitabine (TX) followed by three cycles of cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, and capecitabine (CEX; n = 753) or three cycles of docetaxel (T) followed by three cycles of cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, and fluorouracil (CEF; n = 747). The primary end point was recurrence-free survival (RFS).
During a median follow-up time of 59 months, 214 RFS events occurred (local or distant recurrences or deaths; TX/CEX, n = 96; T/CEF, n = 118). RFS was not significantly different between the groups (hazard ratio [HR], 0.79; 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.04; P = .087; 5-year RFS, 86.6% for TX/CEX v 84.1% for T/CEF). Fifty-six patients assigned to TX/CEX died during the follow-up compared with 75 of patients assigned to T/CEF (HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.52 to 1.04; P = .080). In exploratory analyses, TX/CEX improved breast cancer-specific survival (HR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.44 to 0.95; P = .027) and RFS in women with triple-negative disease and in women who had more than three metastatic axillary lymph nodes at the time of diagnosis. We detected little severe late toxicity.
Integration of capecitabine into a regimen that contains docetaxel, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide did not improve RFS significantly compared with a similar regimen without capecitabine.
Notes
Comment In: J Clin Oncol. 2012 Jan 1;30(1):1-222105825
PubMed ID
22105826 View in PubMed
Less detail

416 records – page 1 of 42.