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29 records – page 1 of 3.

A 1-year, placebo-controlled, double-blind house-dust-mite immunotherapy study in asthmatic adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15782
Source
Allergy. 1997 Aug;52(8):853-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
O T Olsen
K R Larsen
L. Jacobsan
U G Svendsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pulmonery Medicine and Allergology, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark.
Source
Allergy. 1997 Aug;52(8):853-9
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Antigens, Dermatophagoides
Asthma - diagnosis - drug therapy - therapy
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Double-Blind Method
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Glycoproteins - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis - blood - immunology
Immunotherapy
Male
Middle Aged
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Severity of Illness Index
Skin Tests
Steroids - therapeutic use
Vital Capacity
Abstract
Thirty-one adult patients with asthma caused by house-dust mites (HDM) were included in this placebo-controlled, double-blind study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of specific immunotherapy (SIT) with biologically standardized extracts of HDM. The specific diagnosis was confirmed by skin prick tests, specific IgE, and bronchial provocation tests with HDM allergens. The patients were randomized to receive active treatment with extracts of either Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt) or D. farinae (Dfa) (Alutard SQ, ALK, Denmark) or placebo injections. Twenty-three patients completed the study. After 1 year of treatment, we found a clinically important and significant reduction in both asthma medicine consumption (inhaled steroids 38% and beta 2-agonists 46%) and symptom score (57%) in the actively treated group, but not the placebo group. These findings were confirmed by a significant decrease in skin and bronchial sensitivity to HDM in the active group. Additionally, there was a significant difference in the patients' scores for effect in favor of the actively treated group. Total IgE and specific IgE to HDM showed no significant changes before and after treatment for either group. Spirometric lung-function measurements showed a significant increase in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) from 85% before to 89% of predicted values after treatment for the actively treated group. Peak-flow measurements at home showed no significant changes during the study. It is concluded that allergen SIT is an effective treatment in adult patients suffering from asthma due to HDM.
PubMed ID
9284985 View in PubMed
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Allergen content in dust from homes and schools in northern Norway in relation to sensitization and allergy symptoms in schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34349
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 1997 Mar;27(3):252-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
L K Dotterud
T D Van
B. Kvammen
T. Dybendal
S. Elsayed
E S Falk
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University of Tromsø, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 1997 Mar;27(3):252-61
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Antigens, Dermatophagoides
Cats
Child
Dogs
Dust
Glycoproteins - immunology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - immunology
Mites - immunology
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown a high prevalence of atopic diseases among school children in the community of Sør-Varanger. Moreover, animal dander followed by pollen and house dust mite, were the most common allergens in skin prick tests. OBJECTIVE: To assess the allergen content in homes (living-rooms and mattresses) and classrooms of children living in an arctic area at 70 degrees. The presence of allergens in homes and schools and their relationship to atopy was of particular interest. METHODS: Dust samples from 38 homes and seven schools in northern Norway were collected by vacuum cleaning. The presence of allergens of dog, birch, timothy, Cladosporium herbarum, codfish and hen egg-white was investigated by radio-allergosorbent test (RAST) inhibition and the presence of major allergens of cat Felis domesticus (Fel d I) and house dust mites (HDM) Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p I) and Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f I) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). RESULTS: Mattresses contained significantly more dust per unit area than living-rooms and classrooms. No statistically significant differences in allergen content for dog, birch, timothy. Cladosporium, codfish and hen egg-white were seen between HDM-sensitized and non-atopic children. Most dust samples contained dog allergens with the highest allergenic activity found in living-rooms of those keeping dogs. An increased level of Fel d I was detected in only one of 38 samples from living-rooms (this family kept a cat) and in 25 of 38 samples from mattresses with ranges from 24 to 84 ng/m2. The highest concentrations were found in mattresses of children keeping cats. Increased levels (> or = 25 ng/m2) of Der p I were found only in homes and virtually only in mattresses of HDM-sensitized children. An increased level of Der f I was found in only one case, i.e. in the mattress of an HDM-sensitized child where additionally Der p I and HDMs were demonstrated microscopically. When relating Der p I to HDM-sensitization an odds ratio of more than 16 (95% CI: 1.6-394.3) was found. All extracts from living-rooms included codfish allergens. Low RAST inhibition values were detected for hen egg-white. Cladosporium, birch and timothy pollen in most samples. Furthermore, the study demonstrated that dust from schools was relatively free of allergens. CONCLUSION: Previous findings indicating that the main allergen exposure problem in this geographical area is that of pet allergens were confirmed.
PubMed ID
9088651 View in PubMed
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Allergens and endotoxin in settled dust from day-care centers and schools in Oslo, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29525
Source
Indoor Air. 2005 Oct;15(5):356-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
C. Instanes
G. Hetland
S. Berntsen
M. Løvik
P. Nafstad
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. christine.instanes@fhi.no
Source
Indoor Air. 2005 Oct;15(5):356-62
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Allergens - adverse effects - analysis
Animals
Antigens, Dermatophagoides - analysis
Cats
Child
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Dogs
Dust - analysis
Endotoxins - adverse effects - analysis
Glycoproteins - analysis
Humans
Norway
Pyroglyphidae
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools
Abstract
Allergy to indoor allergens can cause frequent and severe health problems in children. Because little is known about the content of allergens in the indoor environments in Norway, we wanted to assess the levels of cat, dog and mite allergens in schools and day-care centers in Oslo. Allergen levels in dust samples from 155 classrooms and 81 day-care units were measured using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Additionally, we measured the levels of endotoxin in 31 day-care units, using the limulus amebocyte lysate test. Most of the dust samples contained detectable amounts of cat and dog allergens. In mattress and floor dust (day-care centers), and curtain and floor dust (schools) the median Fel d 1 levels were 0.17, 0.002, 0.02 and 0.079 microg/m2, while the median Can f 1 levels were 1.7, 0.03, 0.1 and 0.69 microg/m2, respectively. Levels of cat and dog allergens in school floor dust were associated with the number of pupils with animals at home. In contrast,
PubMed ID
16108908 View in PubMed
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Allergen skin test reactivity in an unselected Danish population. The Glostrup Allergy Study, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67758
Source
Allergy. 1994 Feb;49(2):86-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
N H Nielsen
U G Svendsen
F. Madsen
A. Dirksen
Author Affiliation
Glostrup Population Studies, Medical Department C, Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Allergy. 1994 Feb;49(2):86-91
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Allergens
Animals
Antigens, Dermatophagoides
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fungi
Glycoproteins
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pollen
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Skin Tests
Smoking
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the distribution of allergen skin test reactivity in an unselected Danish population. A total of 793 subjects, aged 15-69 years, were invited, and 599 (75.5%) attended. The skin prick test was performed with standardized allergen extracts of high potency. Skin reactivity occurred in 28.4% of the subjects. The frequency of skin reactivity to the specific allergens ranged from 1.5% (Cladosporium) to 12.5% (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus), and the frequencies of skin reactivity to the allergen groups (pollen, animal dander, house-dust mites, and molds) were 17.6%, 8.7%, 14.0%, and 3.2%, respectively. Young women appeared to reflect the average skin reactivity. When compared with young women, skin reactivity to animal dander was more probable in young men (odds ratio (OR) value = 2.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) of odds ratio value = 1.1-6.1). Current smokers were less likely than nonsmokers to be skin-reactive to pollen (OR = 0.4; 95% CI = 0.3-0.7). In conclusion, allergen skin test reactivity was common, and was related to sex, age, smoking history, and probably genetic predisposition.
PubMed ID
8172364 View in PubMed
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Assessing the health effects and risks associated with children's inhalation exposures--asthma and allergy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84952
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2008 Feb;71(3):196-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Selgrade MaryJane K
Plopper Charles G
Gilmour M Ian
Conolly Rory B
Foos Brenda S P
Author Affiliation
National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, North California, USA. selgrade.maryjane@epa.gov
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2008 Feb;71(3):196-207
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - immunology
Animals
Antigens, Dermatophagoides - adverse effects - immunology
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Child, Preschool
Disease Models, Animal
Humans
Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects
Lung - drug effects - growth & development - immunology
Oxidants, Photochemical - adverse effects
Ozone - adverse effects
Risk assessment
Species Specificity
Abstract
Adults and children may have different reactions to inhalation exposures due to differences in target tissue doses following similar exposures, and/or different stages in lung growth and development. In the case of asthma and allergy both the developing immune system and initial encounters with common allergens contribute to this differential susceptibility. Asthma, the most common chronic childhood disease, has significant public health impacts and is characterized by chronic lung inflammation, reversible airflow obstruction, and immune sensitization to allergens. Animal studies described here suggest that air pollutants exacerbate asthma symptoms and may also play a role in disease induction. Changes characteristic of asthma were observed in rhesus monkeys sensitized to house dust mite antigen (HDMA) as infants and exposed repeatedly thereafter to ozone (O3) and HDMA. O3 exposure compromised airway growth and development and exacerbated the allergen response to favor intermittent airway obstruction and wheeze. In Brown Norway rats a variety of air pollutants enhanced sensitization to HDMA such that symptoms elicited in response to subsequent allergen challenge were more severe. Although useful for assessing air pollutants effects on initial sensitization, the rodent immune system is immature at birth relative to humans, making this model less useful for studying differential effects between adults and children. Because computational models available to address children's inhalation exposures are limited, default adjustments and their associated uncertainty will continue to be used in children's inhalation risk assessment. Because asthma is a complex (multiple genes, phenotypes, organ systems) disease, this area is ripe for systems biology approaches.
PubMed ID
18097945 View in PubMed
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Biologic activity of Dermatophagoides siboney and Blomia tropicalis allergens in exposed and unexposed mite-allergic individuals. Effect of patient selection on the biologic standardization of mite extracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15662
Source
Allergy. 1999 Apr;54(4):392-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
R. Casas
R. Ferrándiz
J A Wihl
B. Fernández
S. Dreborg
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Environment, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 1999 Apr;54(4):392-6
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Allergens - immunology
Allergy and Immunology - standards
Animals
Antigens, Dermatophagoides
Asthma - immunology
Child
Child, Preschool
Climate
Cuba
Glycoproteins - immunology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - immunology
Middle Aged
Mites - immunology
Patient Selection
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Tests
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate the influence of patient selection criteria, i.e., mite-allergic individuals exposed and not exposed to Dermatophagoides siboney and Blomia tropicalis, on the biologic activity of mite extracts. Determination of the potency of mite extracts in vivo requires selection of patients with a clinical history of mite allergy. In Scandinavia, there are some anamnestic criteria for mite allergy, whereas in the tropics, where patients are continuously exposed to high levels of mites, selection of patients with mite allergy by clinical history is difficult. METHODS: A total of 210 Cuban asthmatics with continuous symptoms, and 43 Swedes with a clinical history of mite allergy were investigated. Skin prick tests were performed with D. siboney, D. pteronyssinus, D. farinae, B. tropicalis, Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor, and Tyrophagus putrescentiae extracts. For analysis of the biologic activity of mite extracts, Cuban patients were divided into four groups: 1) all patients skin-test-positive to mites 2) patients positive to mites, but not to other inhalant allergens 3) patients reacting most to the mite species analyzed 4) patients reactive only to mites and reacting most to the mite species analyzed. The biologic potency was calculated according to the Nordic Guidelines. RESULTS: Due to cross-reactivity between mites, Swedish mite-sensitive patients, with a clear clinical history of mite allergy, but not exposed to D. siboney and B. tropicalis, were more skin reactive to these mites than were Cubans. The estimated potency increased gradually to >200% in group 4. In group 1 Cubans, the reactivity to all mites but B. tropicalis was lower than that in mite-sensitive Swedes. CONCLUSIONS: According to the influence of patient selection criteria on the estimation of the potency of mite extracts, the determination of the biologic activity of allergenic extracts in subjects without a clear-cut clinical history should be replaced by new methods when available.
PubMed ID
10371100 View in PubMed
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Cat, dog, and house-dust-mite allergen levels of house dust in Finnish apartments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206055
Source
Allergy. 1998 Feb;53(2):195-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
P. Raunio
A L Pasanen
M. Reiman
T. Virtanen
Author Affiliation
University of Kuopio, Department of Environmental Sciences, Finland.
Source
Allergy. 1998 Feb;53(2):195-9
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - analysis
Animals
Antigens, Dermatophagoides
Antigens, Plant
Dust - analysis
Finland
Glycoproteins - analysis
Housing
Humans
Abstract
The presence of indoor allergens in Finnish homes was studied for the first time. Dust samples (n = 30) were collected by vacuuming a 1 m2 area from a living-room carpet in 30 apartments divided into three groups: homes with cats (n = 10), homes with dogs (n = 10), and homes without pets (n = 10). The levels of major cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1), and house-dust-mite (Der p 1) allergens were analyzed by two-site ELISA methods. Der p 1 levels were below the detection limit in all dust samples. In the homes with cats or dogs, Fel 1 d and Can f 1 levels ranged from 147 to 2800 micrograms/g (geometric mean 296 micrograms/g), respectively, 567 micrograms/g), and from 86 to 1400 micrograms/g (geometric mean 296 micrograms/g), respectively, being slightly higher than those reported elsewhere. Low allergen levels, mainly below 3 micrograms/g were also detected in the homes without pets, indicating the transfer of allergens from place to place. However, in 25% of these samples, allergen levels exceeded the proposed threshold levels for cat or dog sensitization. The presence of pets was the most significant factor affecting cat and dog allergen levels in the house dust, and other factors, such as the amount of dust collected, residential time, and cleaning habits, had no or only a weak effect on allergen levels.
PubMed ID
9534920 View in PubMed
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Commercial availability of a house dust mite patch test.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15488
Source
Am J Contact Dermat. 2001 Jun;12(2):115-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
C M Mowad
C K Anderson
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA, USA.
Source
Am J Contact Dermat. 2001 Jun;12(2):115-8
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antigens, Dermatophagoides
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis
Glycoproteins - diagnostic use
Humans
Mites
Patch Tests - economics - standards
United States
Abstract
The house dust mite long has been studied for its potential role in atopic dermatitis. Its part in the pathogenesis of asthma and allergic rhinitis has been studied and is accepted. Testing for the dust mite allergen in this arena is performed with radioallergosorbent tests (RASTs) and prick testing. For several reasons, including the lack of a standardized testing tool, the difficulty in removing dust from the environment and the lack of association of dust and skin disease by patients, the role of the house dust mite in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis and skin disease has been questioned. Chemotechnique Diagnostics (Malmo, Sweden) now provides a standardized dust mite allergen in petrolatum in 2 concentrations. Dermatophagoides mix is a 50:50 mix of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae at concentrations of 20% and 30%. The availability of a standardized patch test allergen for the house dust mite provides a better tool to investigate the role of this allergen as a contactant.
PubMed ID
11381349 View in PubMed
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Comparative detection of mite allergens in house dust of homes in Moscow by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and acarologic analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216848
Source
Allergy. 1994 Dec;49(10):816-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
T M Zheltikova
I G Ovsyannikova
V B Gervazieva
T A Platts-Mills
M D Chapman
A D Petrova-Nikitina
G N Stepanova
Author Affiliation
Mechnikov Research Institute for Vaccines and Sera (Russian Academy of Medical Science), Moscow.
Source
Allergy. 1994 Dec;49(10):816-9
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antigens, Dermatophagoides
Asthma - etiology
Child
Dust - analysis
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Glycoproteins - analysis - isolation & purification
Housing
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications
Methods
Mites - immunology
Moscow
Abstract
The present study revealed that 73% of surveyed apartments in Moscow whose residents included children with the atopic form of bronchial asthma and sensitization to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus allergens were infested with the pyroglyphid mites D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae. The number of mites in the surveyed apartments varied between 0 and 154 mites/g of dust for D. pteronyssinus and between 0 and 162 mites/g of dust for D. farinae. The levels of mite allergens in these apartments ranged from 0.5 to 165.8 micrograms/g for Der p I and from 0.3 to 91.3 micrograms/g of dust for Der f I. The Der p I allergen was found to predominate, and its concentration in one-third of the apartments was more than 10-fold greater than that of Der f I. Correlation between the number of pyroglyphid mites and the concentration of group I allergens was established for both D. pteronyssinus (r = 0.4932; P
PubMed ID
7709990 View in PubMed
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Concentrations of cat (Fel d1), dog (Can f1) and mite (Der f1 and Der p1) allergens in the clothing and school environment of Swedish schoolchildren with and without pets at home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15747
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 1998 Feb;9(1):25-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
M. Berge
A K Munir
S. Dreborg
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 1998 Feb;9(1):25-30
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Allergens - analysis
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Antigens, Dermatophagoides
Asthma
Cats
Child
Clothing
Dogs
Environmental Exposure
Floors and Floorcoverings
Glycoproteins - analysis
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings
Mites
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate whether our hypothesis that cat and dog owners bring allergens to public areas in their clothes was true or not, we studied the levels of Fel d1, Can f1, Der p1 and Der f1 in dust from the clothes and classrooms of children in a Swedish school. We also investigated the levels of allergen in different areas in the four classrooms used by the children. Thirty-one children were selected in four classes, forming three groups: cat owners, dog owners and children without a cat or dog at home. Furthermore, a group of children with asthma was included. Cat and dog allergens were detected in all 57 samples from clothes and classrooms. Mite allergen Der f1 was detected in low concentrations in 6 out of 48 and Der p1 in 5 out of 46 samples investigated. The concentrations of Can f1 were higher than those of Fel d1 in samples from clothes (geometric mean: 2676 ng/g fine dust and 444 ng/g) and classrooms (Can f1: 1092 ng/g, Fel d1: 240 ng/g). The dog owners had significantly higher concentrations of Can f1 (8434 ng/g fine dust) in their clothes than cat owners (1629 ng/g, p
PubMed ID
9560839 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.