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Association of CD44 isoform immunohistochemical expression with myometrial and vascular invasion in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3943
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 2002 Jan;84(1):58-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Gary N Stokes
Jack B Shelton
Christopher M Zahn
Brian S Kendall
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Third Medical Group, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska 99506, USA.
Source
Gynecol Oncol. 2002 Jan;84(1):58-61
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antigens, CD44 - biosynthesis
Carcinoma, Endometrioid - blood supply - metabolism - pathology
Endometrial Neoplasms - blood supply - metabolism - pathology
Female
Glycoproteins - biosynthesis
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Myometrium - pathology
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Neovascularization, Pathologic - metabolism
Protein Isoforms
Solubility
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Appropriate clinical management of cases of FIGO Grade I and II endometrial carcinoma relies heavily on the determination of myometrial invasion (MI). There are no reports addressing expression of the cell adhesion molecule CD44 in the subset of Grade I and II endometrioid carcinoma (EC) as it relates to prognosis, including MI. METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining for CD44s and CD44v6 was evaluated in 40 hysterectomy specimens with Grade I and II EC, including 11 noninvasive ECs, 14 with MI 50%). Staining characteristics according to the presence of MI and vascular space invasion (VSI) were evaluated. Strong membranous staining of >10% of tumor cells was interpreted as positive. RESULTS: CD44v6 staining was positive in 20% (8/40) of cases, including 45% (5/11) of EC without MI but only 10% (3/29) with MI (P = 0.025). CD44v6 staining was not present in deeply invasive tumors (0/15), while it was present in 8/25 superficially or noninvasive tumors (P = 0.016). Sensitivity and specificity were 25 and 100%, respectively, using CD44v6 in evaluating deep myometrial invasion. CD44s showed a trend toward positive staining when comparing noninvasive versus invasive tumors and noninvasive/superficially invasive versus deeply invasive tumors (P = 0.08 and 0.12, respectively). CD44s or CD44v6 staining was highly specific for absence of VSI, although statistical comparison did not reach significance. CONCLUSION: Deeply invasive EC was associated with a consistent lack of CD44v6 expression. This may have potential clinical utility if this finding is demonstrated in further study of prehysterectomy sampling specimens containing EC.
PubMed ID
11748977 View in PubMed
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Hyaluronic acid production and CD44 expression in cultured dermal fibroblasts of patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with and without chronic ulcers on the lower extremity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47066
Source
Wound Repair Regen. 2005 Mar-Apr;13(2):181-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Natalia Y Yevdokimova
Sergey E Podpryatov
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Immunology, Institute of Biochemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine. berezan@mathber.carrier.kiev.ua
Source
Wound Repair Regen. 2005 Mar-Apr;13(2):181-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antigens, CD44 - biosynthesis
Cells, Cultured
Dermis - physiopathology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - physiopathology
Female
Fibroblasts - metabolism
Glucosamine - metabolism
Humans
Hyaluronic Acid - biosynthesis
Lactic Acid - metabolism
Leg Ulcer - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Wound Healing - physiology
Abstract
It is well known that hyaluronic acid and its principal receptor, CD44, are implicated in the regulation of the tissue repair process, but their role in the formation of chronic diabetic ulcers has not been studied. Hyaluronic acid metabolism and CD44 expression are regulated by lactate, where their increased production is considered to affect the properties of fibroblasts in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The aim of our work was to investigate the possible role of hyaluronic acid and CD44, and their regulation by lactate, in the abnormal wound healing of diabetes. Fibroblasts were derived from uninjured skin from four non-insulin-dependent diabetic patients with ulcers and four without ulcers; and from four healthy age-matched volunteers. We observed that diabetic fibroblasts of both groups produced more L-lactate ( approximately 30%) and incorporated more (3)H-glucosamine into the medium hyaluronic acid ( approximately 28%) than controls. Fibroblasts of the diabetic group with ulcers, unlike those of the group without ulcers, showed significant increases in the high molecular weight hyaluronic acid accumulation in the pericellular matrix (30.5%, p
PubMed ID
15828943 View in PubMed
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[Hyaluronic acid, receptor CD44, and their role in diabetic complications]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89841
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2008 Sep-Oct;80(5):5-44
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ievdokimova N Iu
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2008 Sep-Oct;80(5):5-44
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antigens, CD44 - biosynthesis - chemistry - metabolism
Diabetes Complications - metabolism
Endothelial Cells - metabolism
Endothelium, Vascular - cytology - metabolism
Humans
Hyaluronic Acid - biosynthesis - chemistry - metabolism
Models, Molecular
Muscle, Smooth, Vascular - cytology - metabolism
Abstract
Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a straight chain glycosaminoglycan polymer composed of repeating units of the disaccharide [-D-glucuronic acid-beta1,3-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-beta1,4-]n, and is found in vertebrates and certain microorganisms. The molecular weight of HA chains is usually equal to approximately 1-10 and MDa, n > 10(3-4), although it can exists as oligosaccharides under some physiological and pathological conditions. HA resides on the cell surface or in the extracellular space, but it also occurred inside the mammalian cells. HA is synthesized in mammals by three enzymes with polymers of varying chain length. The biological functions of HA include the maintenance of elastoviscosity of liquid connective tissues, control of tissue hydration, supramolecular assembly of proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix and besides numerous receptor-mediated functions in cell attachment, mitosis, migration, tumor development, wound healing and inflammation. The extensive repertoire of biological functions of HA corresponds to the existence of a large repertoire of HA-binding proteins (hyaladherins). Many hyaladherins contain a common structural domain, termed a Link module, which is involved in ligand binding. The most important member of the Link module superfamily is the main HA receptor, CD44. CD44 has diverse functions including not only the organization and metabolism of extracellular matrix, but also engage the cytoskeleton and co-ordinate signaling events to enable the cell responce to changes in the environment. HA has an extraordinary high rate of turnover, and at the cellular level it is considered to be degraded progressively by a series of enzymatic reactions that generate polymers of decreasing sizes. HA biological effects are known to be determined by the polymer size and depend on the cell type. For example, the native high molecular weight HA is anti-angiogenic, while its degradation products (6-20 saccharides) stimulate endothelial cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. In contrast, these fragments inhibit the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas high molecular weight HA promotes cell growth and migration. The dysregulation of HA metabolism is a typical feature of diabetes complications, and increased glucose level is considered to be the main cause of this phenomenon. The HA depolymerization due to the effect of free radicals and advanced glycation end products leads to the vitreous body liquefaction, and may be the reason of the proliferative retinopathy in diabetes. The enrichment of extracellular matrix with high molecular weight HA under the action of high glucose level was demonstrated for vascular smooth muscle cells, skin fibroblasts, endothelial and mesangial cells. This effect is considered to accelerate the development of atherosclerosis stimulating the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, and to promote the transformation of acute wounds into chronic ulcers deepening the pathological state of dermal fibroblasts in diabetes. And, on the contrary, the accumulation of high molecular weight HA on the surface of endothelial cells may have positive value for the glycocalyx integrity. Since high molecular weight HA is known to possess the anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effect, the enrichment of mesangial matrix with it may represent an endogenous mechanism to limit renal injury in diabetes. Thus, the investigation of HA metabolism in diabetes mellitus emphasizes the dependence of HA biological effects on cell type and demonstrates the importance of this molecule for tissue homeostasis.
PubMed ID
19248616 View in PubMed
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