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Antidepressant monotherapy vs sequential pharmacotherapy and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, or placebo, for relapse prophylaxis in recurrent depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138809
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;67(12):1256-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Zindel V Segal
Peter Bieling
Trevor Young
Glenda MacQueen
Robert Cooke
Lawrence Martin
Richard Bloch
Robert D Levitan
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada. zindel_segal@camh.net
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2010 Dec;67(12):1256-64
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Attention
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Combined Modality Therapy - methods
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - prevention & control - psychology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Outpatients - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Recurrence - prevention & control
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a group-based psychosocial intervention designed to enhance self-management of prodromal symptoms associated with depressive relapse.
To compare rates of relapse in depressed patients in remission receiving MBCT against maintenance antidepressant pharmacotherapy, the current standard of care.
Patients who met remission criteria after 8 months of algorithm-informed antidepressant treatment were randomized to receive maintenance antidepressant medication, MBCT, or placebo and were followed up for 18 months.
Outpatient clinics at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and St Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario.
One hundred sixty patients aged 18 to 65 years meeting DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder with a minimum of 2 past episodes. Of these, 84 achieved remission (52.5%) and were assigned to 1 of the 3 study conditions.
Patients in remission discontinued their antidepressants and attended 8 weekly group sessions of MBCT, continued taking their therapeutic dose of antidepressant medication, or discontinued active medication and were switched to placebo.
Relapse was defined as a return, for at least 2 weeks, of symptoms sufficient to meet the criteria for major depression on module A of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV.
Intention-to-treat analyses showed a significant interaction between the quality of acute-phase remission and subsequent prevention of relapse in randomized patients (P = .03). Among unstable remitters (1 or more Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score >7 during remission), patients in both MBCT and maintenance treatment showed a 73% decrease in hazard compared with placebo (P = .03), whereas for stable remitters (all Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression scores =7 during remission) there were no group differences in survival.
For depressed patients achieving stable or unstable clinical remission, MBCT offers protection against relapse/recurrence on a par with that of maintenance antidepressant pharmacotherapy. Our data also highlight the importance of maintaining at least 1 long-term active treatment in unstable remitters.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21135325 View in PubMed
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Associations between generic substitution and patients' attitudes, beliefs and experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113091
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2013 Oct;69(10):1827-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Jette Rathe
Pia Larsen
Morten Andersen
Maja Paulsen
Dorte Jarbøl
Janus Thomsen
Jens Soendergaard
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, Research Unit of General Practice, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark, jrathe@health.sdu.dk.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2013 Oct;69(10):1827-36
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anticonvulsants - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases, Pharmaceutical
Denmark
Drug Substitution - statistics & numerical data
Drugs, Generic - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Patient Medication Knowledge
Questionnaires
Therapeutic Equivalency
Young Adult
Abstract
Generic substitution has been implemented in many countries, but knowledge about patients' attitudes, beliefs and experiences is still sparse.
To assess associations between generic switching and patients' attitudes, beliefs and experiences with previous generic switching.
A cross-sectional study comprising questionnaire responses from 2,476 randomly selected patients aged 20 years or older and living in the Region of Southern Denmark, who had redeemed substitutable drugs.
The questionnaire included items on beliefs about medicine, views on generic medicine and confidence in the healthcare system. Only prescriptions issued by the general practitioners were included. For each patient, we focused on one purchase of a generically substitutable drug (index drug). Patients were identified by means of a dispensing database.
Earlier generic switches within the index ATC code were statistically significantly associated with experience of a generic switch (adjusted OR 5.93; 95 % CI 4.70-7.49). Having had more than five earlier switches within other ATC codes and having negative views on generic medicines reduced the odds of experiencing a generic switch. No associations were found between generic substitution and gender, drug group, number of different drugs used by the patient, confidence in the health care system and beliefs about medicine in general.
Patients who had once experienced a generic switch were more likely to accept a future generic switch within the same ATC code. Negative views on generic medicines were negatively associated with switching, while beliefs about medicine and confidence in the healthcare system had no influence.
PubMed ID
23765409 View in PubMed
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A Comparison of Sex Differences in Psychotropic Medication Use in Older People with Alzheimer's Disease in the US and Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285249
Source
Drugs Aging. 2017 Jan;34(1):55-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Daniela C Moga
Heidi Taipale
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Qishan Wu
Gregory A Jicha
Danijela Gnjidic
Source
Drugs Aging. 2017 Jan;34(1):55-65
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy - psychology
Anti-Anxiety Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Psychotropic Drugs - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Sex Characteristics
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Given the high prevalence of psychotropic medication use in people with dementia and the potential for different prescribing practices in men and women, our study aimed to investigate sex differences in psychotropic medication use in older adults with Alzheimer's disease (AD) living in the US and Finland.
We used data collected between 2005 and 2011 as part of the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) in the US, and Medication use and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) cohorts in Finland. We evaluated psychotropic medication use (antidepressant, antipsychotic, anxiolytic, sedative, or hypnotic) in participants aged 65 years or older. We employed multivariable logistic regression adjusted for demographics, co-morbidities, and other medications to estimate the magnitude of the association (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] with 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) according to sex.
We included 1099 NACC participants (502 [45.68%] men, 597 [54.32%] women), and 67,049 participants from the MEDALZ cohort (22,961 [34.24%] men, 44,088 [65.75%] women). Women were more likely than men to use psychotropic medications: US, 46.2% vs. 33.1%, p 
Notes
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PubMed ID
27896799 View in PubMed
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Consequences of a false-positive mammography result: drug consumption before and after screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280075
Source
Acta Oncol. 2016 May;55(5):572-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
My von Euler-Chelpin
Christina Bæksted
Ilse Vejborg
Elsebeth Lynge
Source
Acta Oncol. 2016 May;55(5):572-6
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Aged
Anti-Anxiety Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Anxiety - drug therapy - etiology
Breast Neoplasms - diagnostic imaging
Denmark
Early Detection of Cancer - adverse effects - psychology
Estrogens - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Mammography - psychology
Mass Screening - adverse effects - psychology
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - drug therapy - etiology
Progestins - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
Background Previous research showed women experiencing false-positive mammograms to have greater anxiety about breast cancer than women with normal mammograms. To elucidate psychological effects of false-positive mammograms, we studied impact on drug intake. Methods We calculated the ratio of drug use for women with false-positive versus women with normal mammograms, before and after the event, using population-based registers, 1997-2006. The ratio of the ratios (RRR) assessed the impact. Results Before the test, 40.3% of women from the false-positive group versus 36.2% from the normal group used anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs. There was no difference in use of beta blockers. Hormone therapy was used more frequently by the false-positive, 36.6% versus 28.7%. The proportion of women using anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs increased with 19% from the before to the after period in the false-positive group, and with 16% in the normal group, resulting in an RRR of 1.02 (95% CI 0.92-1.14). RRR was 1.03 for beta blockers, 0.97 for hormone therapy. Conclusion(s) Drugs used to mitigate mood disorders were used more frequently by women with false-positive than by women with normal mammograms already before the screening event, while the changes from before to after screening were similar for both groups. The results point to the importance of control for potential selection in studies of screening effects.
PubMed ID
26799406 View in PubMed
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Continuity is the main challenge in treating major depressive disorder in psychiatric care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176228
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 Feb;66(2):220-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Tarja K Melartin
Heikki J Rytsälä
Ulla S Leskelä
Paula S Lestelä-Mielonen
T Petteri Sokero
Erkki T Isometsä
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 Feb;66(2):220-7
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Attitude to Health
Cohort Studies
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - psychology - therapy
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Patient compliance
Patient Dropouts
Preventive Health Services - standards
Probability
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - methods
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Several evidence-based treatment guidelines for major depressive disorder (MDD) have been published. However, little is known about how recommendations for treatment are adhered to by patients in current usual psychiatric practice.
The Vantaa Depression Study is a prospective, naturalistic cohort study of 269 psychiatric patients with a new episode of DSM-IV MDD who were interviewed with the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Personality Disorders between February 1, 1997, and May 31, 1998, and again at 6 and 18 months. Treatments provided, as well as adherence to and attitudes toward both antidepressants and psychotherapeutic support/psychotherapy, were investigated among the 198 unipolar patients followed for 18 months.
Most depression patients (88%) received antidepressants in the early acute phase, but about half (49%) terminated treatment prematurely. This premature termination was associated with worse outcome of major depressive episodes, and with negative attitudes, mainly explained by fear of dependence on or side effects of antidepressants. Nearly all patients (98%) received some psychosocial treatment in the acute phase; about one fifth (16%) had weekly psychotherapy during the follow-up. About a quarter of patients admitted nonadherence to ongoing treatments.
Problems of psychiatric care seem most related to continuity of treatment. While adequate treatments are provided in the early acute phase, antidepressants are terminated too soon in about half of patients, often following their autonomous decisions. From a secondary and tertiary preventive point of view, improving continuity of treatment would appear a crucial task for improving the outcome of psychiatric patients with MDD.
PubMed ID
15705008 View in PubMed
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Duration of new antidepressant use and factors associated with discontinuation among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300475
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2019 Mar; 75(3):417-425
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Reetta Kettunen
Heidi Taipale
Anna-Maija Tolppanen
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Tiihonen
Sirpa Hartikainen
Marjaana Koponen
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, PO Box 1627, 70211, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2019 Mar; 75(3):417-425
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - drug therapy
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To study how long antidepressants initiated after diagnoses of Alzheimer's disease (AD) were used and factors associated with discontinuation of use among persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition, differences in duration of use between the antidepressants groups were compared.
Register-based Medication use and Alzheimer's disease (MEDALZ) cohort included 70,718 community-dwelling people with AD who were diagnosed during the years 2005-2011. For this study, the new antidepressant users were included after 1-year washout period (N?=?16,501; 68.6% females, mean age 80.9). The duration of antidepressant use was modeled with the PRE2DUP method. Factors associated with treatment discontinuation were assessed with Cox proportional hazard models and included age, gender, comorbid conditions and concomitant medications.
Median duration of the new antidepressant use period was 309 days (IQR 93-830). For selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use, the median duration was 331 days (IQR 101-829), for mirtazapine 202 days (IQR 52-635), and for serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) 134 days (IQR 37-522). After 1-year follow-up, 40.8% had discontinued antidepressant use, 54.6% after 2 years and 64.1% after 3 years. Factors associated with treatment discontinuation were age over 85, male gender, diabetes, and use of memantine, opioids, and antiepileptics whereas benzodiazepines and related drugs and antipsychotic use were inversely associated with discontinuation.
Antidepressants are used for long-term among people with AD. Need and indication for antidepressant use should be assessed regularly as evidence on their efficacy for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia is limited.
PubMed ID
30413841 View in PubMed
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Effect of antidepressant use on admissions to hospital among elderly bipolar patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170717
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2006 Mar;21(3):275-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Ayal Schaffer
Muhammad Mamdani
Anthony Levitt
Nathan Herrmann
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Sunnybrook & Women's College Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ayal.schaffer@sw.ca
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2006 Mar;21(3):275-80
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Bipolar Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The goal of this study was to examine the association between antidepressant use and hospitalization rate for mania or bipolar depression in a large, community-based sample of elderly bipolar patients.
Population-based retrospective cohort design. Administrative healthcare databases were linked for all individuals aged 66 years or older in the Province of Ontario, Canada. Bipolar subjects who received a prescription for an antidepressant medication (n = 1,072) between 1 April 1997 and 31 March 2001 comprised the antidepressant cohort. The control group (n = 3,000) consisted of randomly selected subjects from the eligible bipolar population who did not receive a prescription for an antidepressant medication during the same surveillance period. Primary outcomes were admission to hospital for a manic/mixed or depressive episode.
During a total of 5135 person-years of follow up, 113 admissions for a manic/mixed episode and 28 admissions for a depressive episode were identified. Model based estimates adjusted for a number of covariates revealed that, as compared with the control group, the antidepressant cohort had significantly lower likelihood of admissions for manic/mixed (adjusted rate ratio [aRR] = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3-0.8) but not depressive episodes (aRR = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.2-2.2).
Antidepressant use among elderly bipolar patients was associated with decreased rates of hospitalization for manic/mixed episodes. This finding requires confirmation with further data of antidepressant use among elderly bipolars.
PubMed ID
16477586 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of antidepressant medication use in the Canadian diabetes population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148726
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2010 Sep;45(9):911-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Anna Ivanova
Danit Nitka
Norbert Schmitz
Author Affiliation
Douglas Mental Health University Institute, McGill University, 6875 LaSalle Boulevard, Montreal, QC H4H 1R3, Canada.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2010 Sep;45(9):911-9
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Anxiety Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Drug Utilization
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Abstract
Depression has been shown to be a common co-morbidity in diabetes. From a public health point of view, there is a lack of population-based studies regarding the use of antidepressant medication in non-clinical samples of people with diabetes. The objective of the present study was to provide demographic and clinical information about the use of antidepressant medication in a representative community sample of people with diabetes.
The Canadian Community Health Survey 1.2 (CCHS 1.2) is a cross-sectional survey that collects information related to health status, health-care utilization and health determinants of the Canadian general population. Diabetes presence was ascertained by self-report of physician diagnosis. Depression and anxiety were assessed using a modified version of the World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Antidepressant use was determined through self-report.
The population prevalence of self-reported antidepressant use in the past 12 months was 8.4% (SE = 0.95) among people with diabetes (n = 1,662). People who took antidepressants had higher average body mass index (M = 32.6, SD = 6.5) than those not taking antidepressants (M = 29.2, SD = 5.7). The use of antidepressants was associated with poorer health status and higher number of co-morbid chronic conditions. Half of diabetes subjects who used antidepressant medication in the last year did not have a lifetime history of major depression.
In a community sample of people with diabetes, the prevalence of antidepressant use exceeded the prevalence of major depression. Anxiety disorders and other somatic chronic conditions were associated with the prescription of antidepressant medication in people with diabetes, but without a history of major depression.
PubMed ID
19730761 View in PubMed
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Increase in the duration of antidepressant treatment from 1994 to 2003: a nationwide population-based study from Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140684
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2010 Nov;19(11):1186-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Sinikka Sihvo
Kristian Wahlbeck
Alison McCallum
Tiina Sevon
Martti Arffman
Jari Haukka
Ilmo Keskimäki
Elina Hemminki
Author Affiliation
THL (National Institute for Health and Welfare), Helsinki, Finland. sinikka.sihvo@thl.fi
Source
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2010 Nov;19(11):1186-93
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - drug therapy
Middle Aged
Pharmacoepidemiology
Prevalence
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Abstract
We examined the length and continuity of antidepressant treatment and factors associated with long-term of treatment among adults.
Nationwide data from all reimbursed antidepressant prescriptions in 1994-2003 were linked with patients' data retrieved from Statistics Finland and the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register. Logistic regression models were used to analyse long term use of antidepressants.
The annual prevalence of antidepressant use increased from 3.6% in 1994 to 7.3% in 2003. Short-term use (
PubMed ID
20853310 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.