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110 records – page 1 of 11.

Apheresis in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia: the results of a follow-up of all Norwegian patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122218
Source
J Clin Lipidol. 2012 Jul-Aug;6(4):331-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Asgeir Græsdal
Martin Prøven Bogsrud
Kirsten Bjørklund Holven
Marit S Nenseter
Ingunn Narverud
Gisle Langslet
Magne Brekke
Kjetil Retterstøl
Kjell-Erik Arnesen
Leiv Ose
Author Affiliation
Vestfold Indremedisinske Senter, Sandefjord, Norway.
Source
J Clin Lipidol. 2012 Jul-Aug;6(4):331-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anticholesteremic Agents - therapeutic use
Azetidines - therapeutic use
Blood Component Removal
Child
Child, Preschool
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Homozygote
Humans
Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH), which affects 1 in a million individuals, leads to extremely elevated levels of cholesterol and early-onset cardiovascular disease.
The aim of this study was to assess all 7 HoFH patients treated with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) apheresis in Norway with respect to quality of life, clinical and laboratory assessments, and cardiovascular status.
Apheresis treatment and assessment of cardiovascular status was performed at local hospitals but coordinated by the Lipid Clinic that has followed all patients since diagnosis. Quality of life was evaluated by a validated questionnaire.
Results are shown as median (min-max). LDL cholesterol at diagnosis (untreated) was 704 (592-1268) mg/dL (18.2 [15.3-32.8] mmol/L). Medication was initiated at age 9 (2-35) years, and apheresis treatment at age 10 (6-44) years. Regular once-weekly apheresis combined with the maximum-tolerable doses of a statin and ezetimibe reduced LDL cholesterol to 197 (170-282) mg/dL (5.1 [4.5-7.3] mmol/L) pre-apheresis and 85 (50-108) mg/dL (2.2 [1.3-2.8] mmol/L) post-apheresis. Calculated interval mean LDL cholesterol was 162 (135-220) mg/dL (4.2 [3.5-5.7] mmol/L). Duration of apheresis treatment was 11 (1-24) years. Cardiovascular manifestations progressed in most patients despite the apheresis treatment. The subjects' quality of life was comparable with that of a healthy population, with the exception of two patients, who were significantly affected by coronary disease.
Well-tolerated, once-weekly LDL apheresis achieves lower interval mean LDL cholesterol levels between apheresis treatments than previously reported for apheresis every second week. However, progressions of cardiovascular manifestations still occurred, which highlights the importance of earlier and even more aggressive treatment and follow-up in HoFH.
PubMed ID
22836070 View in PubMed
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Assessing the appropriateness of combining economic data from multinational clinical trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184987
Source
Stat Med. 2003 Jun 30;22(12):1955-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-2003
Author
John R Cook
Michael Drummond
Henry Glick
Joseph F Heyse
Author Affiliation
Health Economic Statistics, Merck Research Laboratories, UN-A102, West Point, PA 19486, U.S.A.
Source
Stat Med. 2003 Jun 30;22(12):1955-76
Date
Jun-30-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticholesteremic Agents - therapeutic use
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Health Care Costs
Humans
Multicenter Studies as Topic - economics - methods
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic - economics - methods
Scandinavia
Simvastatin - therapeutic use
Abstract
Because of the potential for large variability among countries in the utilization and cost of health care resources, it is important to assess the appropriateness of combining economic data across the countries in a multinational clinical economic trial. We show how available tests for interaction can be applied to economic endpoints, including cost-effectiveness ratios and net health benefits. This analysis includes a characterization of possible interactions being quantitative or qualitative in nature. In the absence of interaction, a pooled estimate of the economic endpoint should be representative of the participating countries. We explore the analytic issues by further analysing data from the Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study (4S).
PubMed ID
12802815 View in PubMed
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Association between low plasma vitamin E concentration and progression of early cortical lens opacities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211245
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Sep 1;144(5):496-500
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1996
Author
P. Rouhiainen
H. Rouhiainen
J T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Public Health, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1996 Sep 1;144(5):496-500
Date
Sep-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anticholesteremic Agents - therapeutic use
Arteriosclerosis - blood - drug therapy
Cataract - blood - epidemiology
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Disease Progression
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pravastatin - therapeutic use
Risk factors
Time Factors
Vitamin E - blood
Abstract
The authors evaluated the association between plasma vitamin E content and progression of eye lens opacities. A total of 410 hypercholesterolemic eastern Finnish men participated in the study from January 1990 to September 1993 in Kuopio, Finland. Lens opacities were classified three times at 18-month intervals using the Lens Opacities Classification System II. A low plasma vitamin E level (lowest quartile) was associated with a 3.7-fold excess risk (95% confidence interval 1.2-11.8) of the progression of early cortical lens opacities compared with the highest quartile (p = 0.028). In addition, the number of cigarettes smoked daily was a significant predictor of the progression of cortical lens opacity (relative risk = 1.06 per cigarette, 95% confidence interval 1.003-1.12). The progression of nuclear lens opacities was not associated with either the plasma vitamin E content or smoking. The data suggest that low plasma vitamin E content may be associated with increased risk of the progression of early cortical lens opacity.
PubMed ID
8781465 View in PubMed
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Association of lipoprotein levels with mortality in subjects aged 50 + without previous diabetes or cardiovascular disease: a population-based register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108070
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Sep;31(3):172-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Lise Bathum
René Depont Christensen
Lars Engers Pedersen
Palle Lyngsie Pedersen
John Larsen
Jørgen Nexøe
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Slagelse Hospital, Region Zealand, Denmark. lbat@regionsjaelland.dk
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Sep;31(3):172-80
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticholesteremic Agents - therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - drug therapy - mortality
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Complications
Female
General practice
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the association of lipoprotein and triglyceride levels with all-cause mortality in a population free from diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) at baseline. The European Guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention state that in general total cholesterol (TC) should be
Notes
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Comment In: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2014 Mar;32(1):5224635580
Comment In: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2014 Mar;32(1):5124635579
PubMed ID
23941088 View in PubMed
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Association of physician's sex with risk factor control in treated hypertensive patients from Swedish primary healthcare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91949
Source
J Hypertens. 2008 Oct;26(10):2050-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Journath Gunilla
Hellénius Mai-Lis
Manhem Karin
Kjellgren Karin I
Nilsson Peter M
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology unit, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden. gunilla.journath@ki.se
Source
J Hypertens. 2008 Oct;26(10):2050-6
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anticholesteremic Agents - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - drug therapy
Hypertension - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Physicians, Family
Physicians, Women
Sex Factors
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the association of physician's sex with blood pressure, lipid control, and cardiovascular risk factors in treated hypertensive men and women, stratified for the sex of their physician. METHODS: In a cross-sectional survey of hypertensive patients, 264 primary care physicians (PCPs), 187 men and 77 women from across Sweden, recruited 6537 treated hypertensive patients (48% men) during 2002-2005, consecutively collected from medical records and registered on a web-based form connected to a central database. Patients were included consecutively in the same order as they visited the healthcare centre. RESULTS: Hypertensive women more often reached target systolic/diastolic blood pressure levels (
PubMed ID
18806630 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atherosclerosis and restenosis: reflections on the Lovastatin Restenosis Trial and Scandinavian Simvastatin Survival Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210757
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1996 Nov 1;78(9):1036-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-1996
Author
W S Weintraub
J P Pederson
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1996 Nov 1;78(9):1036-8
Date
Nov-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Anticholesteremic Agents - therapeutic use
Coronary Artery Disease - blood - complications - mortality - prevention & control
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - prevention & control
Humans
Lovastatin - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Myocardial Infarction - prevention & control
Pravastatin - therapeutic use
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Recurrence
Scandinavia
Simvastatin
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Atherosclerosis is related to serum lipids, whereas restenosis after coronary angioplasty is probably not, reflecting different pathophysiologies. Nonetheless, treatment of lipid disorders is appropriate after angioplasty.
PubMed ID
8916484 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atorvastatin treatment is associated with less augmentation of the carotid pressure waveform in hypertension: a substudy of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcome Trial (ASCOT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148799
Source
Hypertension. 2009 Nov;54(5):1009-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Charlotte Manisty
Jamil Mayet
Robyn J Tapp
Peter S Sever
Neil Poulter
Simon A McG Thom
Alun D Hughes
Author Affiliation
International Centre for Circulatory Health, Imperial College London & Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London W2 1LA, UK.
Source
Hypertension. 2009 Nov;54(5):1009-13
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Amlodipine - therapeutic use
Ankle Brachial Index
Anticholesteremic Agents - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination
Carotid Arteries - drug effects - physiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Great Britain
Heptanoic Acids - therapeutic use
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Probability
Prospective Studies
Pulsatile Flow - drug effects
Pyrroles - therapeutic use
Reproducibility of Results
Scandinavia
Severity of Illness Index
Vasodilator Agents - therapeutic use
Abstract
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) reduce cardiovascular events in hypertensive subjects, but their effect on carotid BP, pressure augmentation, and wave reflection is unknown. We compared the effect of atorvastatin with placebo in a substudy of the lipid-lowering arm of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT-LLA). Hypertensive patients (n=142; age=43 to 79 years; 127 male) with total cholesterol
Notes
Comment In: Hypertension. 2009 Nov;54(5):958-919720953
PubMed ID
19720956 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitude changes of general practitioners towards lowering LDL cholesterol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203949
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 1998 Feb;5(1):43-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
T E Strandberg
A. Pitkänen
P. Larjo
P. Hirvonen
A. Kohvakka
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 1998 Feb;5(1):43-6
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anticholesteremic Agents - therapeutic use
Arteriosclerosis - prevention & control
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Confidence Intervals
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Physicians, Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Clinical studies have demonstrated the benefit of lowering cholesterol in decreasing coronary complications. These results need to be implemented in clinical practice, where an important barrier are the attitudes of physicians.
General practitioners in the city of Helsinki were asked to respond to two questionnaires sent to them by post 12 months apart (1996 and 1997); 284 responses were received in 1996 and 258 in 1997.
In addition to brief questions aimed to characterize the responding physician, the questionnaire included four examples of patients: (1) middle-aged man without, or (2) with coronary heart disease (CHD); (3) 70-year-old man with a history of stroke; (4) 70-year-old women with CHD. The physicians were asked at what level of serum low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol they usually initiate drug therapy. Comparisons were made longitudinally between 1996 and 1997, as well as between different patients. Analyses are based on the responses of those physicians who reported that they treat atherosclerotic patients (241 and 237 in 1996 and 1997, respectively).
In case 1 (primary prevention), 40.1% of general practitioners in 1996 compared with 52.4% in 1997 (difference +12.3, 95% CI +3.2(-)+20.9, P
PubMed ID
9816555 View in PubMed
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The benefit of cholesterol-lowering medications after coronary revascularization: a population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173415
Source
Am Heart J. 2005 Aug;150(2):282-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
James M Brophy
Paul Brassard
Chantal Bourgault
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Center, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. james.brophy@mcgill.ca
Source
Am Heart J. 2005 Aug;150(2):282-6
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Anticholesteremic Agents - therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Coronary Artery Bypass
Coronary Artery Disease - etiology
Coronary Stenosis - surgery - therapy
Drug Evaluation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Male
Mortality
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Postoperative Period
Quebec - epidemiology
Recurrence
Registries
Reoperation
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In clinical trials, cholesterol-lowering medications have been proven to decrease mortality and morbidity and are strongly recommended as secondary prevention in patients with established coronary artery disease. In routine practice, the translation of these benefits to elderly patients with recent coronary revascularization is less well known.
Using the provincial computerized administrative databases of the Régie de l'Assurance Maladie du Québec, we identified all elderly patients (>65 years old) in Quebec, Canada, discharged alive after a coronary revascularization procedure (percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass graft) between April 1, 1995, and December 31, 1997, and determined the percentage fulfilling prescriptions for cholesterol-lowering drug therapy. Time-dependent multivariable models examined the clinical end points of total mortality, acute myocardial infarctions, and repeat coronary revascularizations as a function of cholesterol-lowering drug exposure. Patients were followed up until death or December 31, 1999.
We identified 11958 elderly patients who had a coronary revascularization between April 1, 1995, and December 31, 1997. During an average 3-year follow-up, users of cholesterol-lowering medications had a decreased risk of death [hazard ratio (HR) 0.66, 95% CI 0.45-0.96] or myocardial infarction (HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.54-1.11) but no reduction in repeat revascularizations (HR 1.06, 95% CI 0.88-1.28).
In this population-based study of recently revascularized elderly patients, we observed health benefits associated with the use of cholesterol-lowering medications of similar size to those seen in randomized clinical trials. The translation of these benefits from clinical trials to a nonselected population of revascularized patients emphasizes the importance of this aspect of secondary prevention in clinical practice.
PubMed ID
16086931 View in PubMed
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110 records – page 1 of 11.