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63 records – page 1 of 7.

[Anticholesteremic statins reduce myocardial infarction. Milestone studies give a straight answer--at least concerning the males]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54248
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Apr 7;96(14):1725-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-7-1999

Atorvastatin 10 mg plus ezetimibe versus titration to atorvastatin 40 mg: attainment of European and Canadian guideline lipid targets in high-risk subjects =65 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105352
Source
Lipids Health Dis. 2014;13:13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Christian Constance
Ori Ben-Yehuda
Nanette K Wenger
Franklin Zieve
Jianxin Lin
Mary E Hanson
Robert S Lowe
Andrew M Tershakovec
Author Affiliation
Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont Recherche Clinique/Polyclinique, 5415 Boulevard de l'Assomption, Suite 295, H1T 2 M4 Montreal, QC, Canada. constancec@videotron.ca.
Source
Lipids Health Dis. 2014;13:13
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anticholesteremic Agents - administration & dosage
Atherosclerosis - blood - drug therapy
Azetidines - administration & dosage
Canada
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Double-Blind Method
Europe
Female
Heptanoic Acids - administration & dosage
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - blood - drug therapy
Male
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pyrroles - administration & dosage
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Few clinical studies have focused on the efficacy of lipid-lowering therapies in patients =65 years.
After stabilization on atorvastatin 10 mg, hypercholesterolemic subjects =65 years at high/very high risk for CHD and not at LDL-C
Notes
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Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2010 Mar 1;105(5):656-6320185012
PubMed ID
24411003 View in PubMed
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[Be careful about pseudo-information on cost-effectiveness]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54437
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Jan 14;95(3):144
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-14-1998

[Can we afford good cholesterol lowering therapy? Budgeting of statin costs versus medical needs in the county of Stockholm]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47626
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Nov 28;98(48):5472-3, 5476-8, 5481-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-28-2001
Author
B. Wettermark
P. Hjemdahl
Author Affiliation
Huddinge Universitetssjukhus, Stockholms läns landsting, ledamot av LAKSAKs expertgrupp för hjärt-kärlsjukdomar i Stockholms läns landsting.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Nov 28;98(48):5472-3, 5476-8, 5481-3
Date
Nov-28-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anticholesteremic Agents - administration & dosage - economics
Budgets
Coronary Disease - drug therapy - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy - prevention & control
Drug Costs
English Abstract
Health Priorities - economics
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - drug therapy - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines
Primary Prevention - economics
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Increasing drug costs are a concern in Sweden. The costs for statin treatment are considerable, and among those increasing most rapidly (by 30-35% per year). Our survey of eligibility for statin treatment in Stockholm according to current Swedish recommendations (i.e. patients 100 M extra for patients > 75 years and/or high cardiovascular risk. We propose that individual risk assessments should replace crude patient group recommendations to obtain reasonable "numbers needed to treat", i.e. to optimize the expenditure on statins and cost-effectiveness of the therapy. Prioritization of drug expenditures (within and between patient categories) must be debated, and medical needs must be made clear to those who determine the medical budget.
PubMed ID
11769362 View in PubMed
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Chitin-glucan fiber effects on oxidized low-density lipoprotein: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121000
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jan;67(1):2-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
H E Bays
J L Evans
K C Maki
M. Evans
V. Maquet
R. Cooper
J W Anderson
Author Affiliation
Louisville Metabolic and Atherosclerosis Research Center, Louisville, KY, USA.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jan;67(1):2-7
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anticholesteremic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Body mass index
Chitin - chemistry
Double-Blind Method
Female
Fruit - chemistry
Glucans - chemistry
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - blood - complications - diet therapy - physiopathology
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Midwestern United States - epidemiology
Olea - chemistry
Ontario - epidemiology
Overweight - complications
Plant Extracts - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Polysaccharides - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Prebiotics - adverse effects
Risk
Abstract
Elevated oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) may promote inflammation, and is associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease and worsening complications of diabetes mellitus. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of chitin-glucan (CG), alone and in combination with a potentially anti-inflammatory olive oil (OO) extract, for reducing OxLDL in subjects with borderline to high LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) levels.
This 6-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of a novel, insoluble fiber derived from the Aspergillus niger mycelium, CG, evaluated 130 subjects free of diabetes mellitus with fasting LDL-C 3.37-4.92?mmol/l and glucose = 6.94?mmol/l. Participants were randomly assigned to receive CG (4.5?g/day; n=33), CG (1.5?g/day; n=32), CG (1.5?g/day) plus OO extract (135?mg/day; n=30), or matching placebo (n=35).
Administration of 4.5?g/day CG for 6 weeks significantly reduced OxLDL compared with placebo (P=0.035). At the end of study, CG was associated with lower LDL-C levels relative to placebo, although this difference was statistically significant only for the CG 1.5?g/day group (P=0.019). CG did not significantly affect high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, insulin or F2-isoprostane levels. Adverse events did not substantively differ between treatments and placebo.
In this 6-week study, CG (4.5?g/day) reduced OxLDL, an effect that might affect the risk for atherosclerosis.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22948945 View in PubMed
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[Cholesterol depression prevents heart disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208721
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Apr 7;159(15):2193
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-7-1997

[Cholesterol lowering therapy after myocardial infarction. Consequences of the CARE study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54500
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Jun 20;117(16):2341-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-1997
Author
J E Otterstad
E. Hexeberg
I. Holme
I. Hjermann
Author Affiliation
Hjerteseksjonen, Vestfold Sentralsykehus, Tønsberg.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Jun 20;117(16):2341-4
Date
Jun-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aftercare
Aged
Anticholesteremic Agents - administration & dosage
Cause of Death
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - prevention & control
Norway - epidemiology
Pravastatin - administration & dosage
Recurrence
Abstract
In the recently published CARE-study, 4,159 patients aged 21-75 years were included and randomised to treatment with pravastatin 40 mg once daily or placebo 3-20 months following a myocardial infarction. Inclusion criteria were a total cholesterol
PubMed ID
9265282 View in PubMed
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Circulating proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 has a diurnal rhythm synchronous with cholesterol synthesis and is reduced by fasting in humans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140359
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2010 Dec;30(12):2666-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Lena Persson
Guoqing Cao
Lars Ståhle
Beatrice G Sjöberg
Jason S Troutt
Robert J Konrad
Cecilia Gälman
Håkan Wallén
Mats Eriksson
Ingiäld Hafström
Suzanne Lind
Maria Dahlin
Per Amark
Bo Angelin
Mats Rudling
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology, Center for Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2010 Dec;30(12):2666-72
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticholesteremic Agents - administration & dosage
Cholesterol - biosynthesis - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cholestyramine Resin - administration & dosage
Circadian Rhythm
Cross-Over Studies
Down-Regulation
Energy intake
Fasting - blood
Female
Heptanoic Acids - administration & dosage
Human Growth Hormone - administration & dosage
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Ketogenic Diet
Liver - drug effects - metabolism
Male
Proprotein Convertases
Pyrroles - administration & dosage
Receptors, LDL - metabolism
Serine Endopeptidases - blood
Sweden
Abstract
To gain insight into the function of proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) in humans by establishing whether circulating levels are influenced by diurnal, dietary, and hormonal changes.
We monitored circulating PCSK9 in a set of dynamic human experiments and could show that serum PCSK9 levels display a diurnal rhythm that closely parallels that of cholesterol synthesis, measured as serum lathosterol. In contrast to these marked diurnal changes in cholesterol metabolism, serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels remained stable during the diurnal cycle. Depletion of liver cholesterol by treatment with the bile acid-binding resin, cholestyramine, abolished the diurnal rhythms of both PCSK9 and lathosterol. Fasting (>18 hours) strongly reduced circulating PCSK9 and lathosterol levels, whereas serum LDL levels remained unchanged. Growth hormone, known to be increased during fasting in humans, reduced circulating PCSK9 in parallel to LDL cholesterol levels.
Throughout the day, and in response to fasting and cholesterol depletion, circulating PCSK9 displays marked variation, presumably related to oscillations in hepatic cholesterol that modify its activity in parallel with cholesterol synthesis. In addition to this sterol-mediated regulation, additional effects on LDL receptors may be mediated by hormones directly influencing PCSK9.
PubMed ID
20884874 View in PubMed
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The clinical effect and tolerability of ezetimibe in high-risk patients managed in a specialty cardiovascular risk reduction clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167496
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 Sep;22(11):939-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Glen J Pearson
Gordon A Francis
Jacques S Romney
Dawna M Gilchrist
Andrea Opgenorth
Gabor T Gyenes
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. glen.pearson@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 Sep;22(11):939-45
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Anticholesteremic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Azetidines - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Hyperlipidemias - blood - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Retrospective Studies
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Ezetimibe (EZ) is a selective cholesterol absorption inhibitor approved for use in Canada. The effect and tolerability of EZ among patients was evaluated in the clinical setting of a specialty cardiovascular risk reduction clinic at the University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta. patients and
All patients 18 years of age or older who were prescribed EZ were included, unless they failed to take EZ for a minimum of two weeks, did not have baseline and on-EZ low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, or had concomitant lipid-lowering drugs or dosages changed within one month of starting EZ.
Eighty-four patients (mean age 57.9 years) were included. By Framingham risk calculation, 71.4% were found to be high-risk patients, 13.1% moderate-risk patients and 15.5% low-risk patients; 66.7% of patients had prior cardiovascular events. On EZ, the mean reductions were: total cholesterol level 1.11 mmol/L (16.5%); LDL-C level 1.01 mmol/L (22.3%); high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level 0.06 mmol/L (4.6%); and ratio of total cholesterol level to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level 0.68 mmol/L (12.8%); all were statistically significant (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
16971979 View in PubMed
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The combined use of cholesterol-lowering drugs and cholesterol-lowering bread spreads: health behavior data from Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178019
Source
Prev Med. 2004 Nov;39(5):849-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Nynke de Jong
Meri Simojoki
Tiina Laatikainen
Heli Tapanainen
Liisa Valsta
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Antti Uutela
Erkki Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. nynke.de.jong@rivm.nl
Source
Prev Med. 2004 Nov;39(5):849-55
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Anticholesteremic Agents - administration & dosage
Bread
Cholesterol - blood
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Hypercholesterolemia - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Margarine - utilization
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Cholesterol-lowering drugs may metabolically interact with cholesterol-lowering bread spreads. This study analyses the prevalence of use of drugs, bread spreads or the combination of both in people aware of their high/elevated cholesterol level, and compares users of the three therapies on health behavior and demographics.
Participants (9581, 25-74 years) from The National FINRISK 2002 Study filled out a questionnaire on demographics and health (related) issues. Blood samples, blood pressure, body weight and height were measured.
Of those who reported to have a high cholesterol level (31% of the study population), 19% used cholesterol-lowering drugs, 11% used cholesterol-lowering bread spreads and 5% combined both therapies. On a population level, only 1% jointly used a drug and bread spread therapy. The combination was used by especially highly educated people and those having a healthy diet.
Combining a cholesterol-lowering drug with a bread spread regimen is relatively rare, even among those being aware of their high cholesterol levels. The combined usage was most frequent among 'the better off'. Public health risks of a metabolic interaction between both therapies may not be of major importance yet, but future follow-up is recommended.
PubMed ID
15475015 View in PubMed
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63 records – page 1 of 7.