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Adalimumab treatment is associated with improvement in health-related quality of life in psoriasis: patient-reported outcomes from a phase II randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164616
Source
J Dermatolog Treat. 2007;18(1):25-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Richard Shikiar
Michael Heffernan
Richard G Langley
Mary K Willian
Martin M Okun
Dennis A Revicki
Author Affiliation
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA.
Source
J Dermatolog Treat. 2007;18(1):25-31
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Canada
Dermatologic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Female
Health status
Humans
Injections, Subcutaneous
Male
Middle Aged
Psoriasis - drug therapy
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
Psoriasis substantially impairs the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients, and a comprehensive evaluation of treatment includes HRQOL measures.
To assess the impact of adalimumab on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) of patients with moderate to severe psoriasis.
In a Phase II, randomized, controlled trial, the efficacy and safety of two dosages of adalimumab (40 mg weekly or every other week) versus placebo were assessed for 12 weeks in the treatment of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Patients completed the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Short-Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey, and EuroQOL-5D (EQ-5D) at baseline and 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients achieving a > or =75% reduction in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (PASI 75). Investigators assessed PASI and Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) scores.
Adalimumab patients (either dosage) displayed significantly greater improvements versus placebo patients in DLQI, EQ-5D, and SF-36 Mental Component Summary scores, as well as in Bodily Pain, Vitality, Social Functioning, Role-Emotional, and Mental Health domains. The adalimumab 40-mg weekly group also reported significantly greater improvements in SF-36 Physical Component Summary scores versus the placebo group.
Both adalimumab dosages were efficacious in improving dermatology-specific and general PROs in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis.
Notes
Comment In: J Dermatolog Treat. 2007;18(1):417365258
PubMed ID
17365264 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addition of sunitinib to cetuximab and irinotecan in patients with heavily pre-treated advanced colorectal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142304
Source
Acta Oncol. 2010 Aug;49(6):833-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Camilla Qvortrup
Benny Vittrup Jensen
Trine Lembrecht Jorgensen
Dorte Nielsen
Jon Kroll Bjerregaard
Per Pfeiffer
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. Camilla.qvortrup@ouh.regionsyddanmark.dk
Source
Acta Oncol. 2010 Aug;49(6):833-6
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - therapeutic use
Camptothecin - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Colorectal Neoplasms - drug therapy - pathology
Compassionate Use Trials
Denmark
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Humans
Indoles - administration & dosage
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Organoplatinum Compounds - administration & dosage
Pyrroles - administration & dosage
Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases - antagonists & inhibitors
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Results of continuous sunitinib, in combination with cetuximab and irinotecan every other week (SIC) for compassionate use in heavily pre-treated patients with mCRC are presented.
Patients with mCRC resistant to oxaliplatin, irinotecan, 5-FU and cetuximab received SIC at two Danish oncologic departments. The regimen consisted of sunitinib given as a continuous-dosing in combination with cetuximab and irinotecan every other week (CetIri). The first six patients started with a daily oral dose of sunitinib of 12.5 mg. Subsequent patients started at a daily dose of 25 mg with the possibility to escalate to 37.5 mg.
Twenty-nine patients received SIC. No patient had an objective response, but 13 patients had subjective relief and 42% had stable disease. The median time to progression was 3.2 months and median overall survival was 7.4 months. Fatigue and leukopenia were the most frequently reported severe adverse event (18% grade 3 and 18% grade 3/4, respectively).
Sunitinib continuous-dosing with 25 mg/day can safely be combined with CetIri administered every other week.
PubMed ID
20615171 View in PubMed
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Adherence, preference, and satisfaction of postmenopausal women taking denosumab or alendronate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140933
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 Jun;22(6):1725-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
D L Kendler
M R McClung
N. Freemantle
M. Lillestol
A H Moffett
J. Borenstein
S. Satram-Hoang
Y-C Yang
P. Kaur
D. Macarios
S. Siddhanti
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, 600-1285 West Broadway, V6H 3X8 Vancouver, BC, Canada. kendler@ca.inter.net
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 Jun;22(6):1725-35
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Aged
Alendronate - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Bone Density - drug effects
Bone Density Conservation Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
British Columbia
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Injections, Subcutaneous
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - drug therapy - physiopathology - psychology
Patient Preference - statistics & numerical data
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In this study, 250 women with osteoporosis were randomized to 12 months with subcutaneous denosumab 60 mg every 6 months or oral alendronate 70 mg once weekly, then crossed over to the other treatment. The primary endpoint, treatment adherence at 12 months, was 76.6% for alendronate and 87.3% for denosumab.
The purpose of this study is to evaluate treatment adherence with subcutaneous denosumab 60 mg every 6 months or oral alendronate 70 mg once weekly.
In this multicenter, randomized, open-label, 2-year, crossover study, 250 postmenopausal women with low bone mineral density received denosumab or alendronate for 12 months, then the other treatment for 12 months. The alendronate bottle had a medication event monitoring system cap to monitor administration dates. Definitions were as follows: compliance, receiving both denosumab doses 6 (± 1) months apart or 80-100% of alendronate doses; persistence, receiving both denosumab doses and completing the month 12 visit within the visit window or = 2 alendronate doses in the final month; adherence, achieving both compliance and persistence. This report includes data from the first 12 months.
The primary study endpoint, adherence in the first 12 months, was 76.6% (95/124) for alendronate and 87.3% (110/126) for denosumab. Risk ratios for denosumab compared with alendronate at 12 months were 0.58 (p = 0.043) for non-adherence, 0.48 (p = 0.014) for non-compliance, and 0.54 (p = 0.049) for non-persistence. Subject ratings for treatment necessity, preference, and satisfaction were significantly greater for denosumab and ratings for treatment bother were significantly greater for alendronate. Adverse events were reported by 64.1% of alendronate-treated subjects and 72.0% of denosumab-treated subjects (p = 0.403). The most common adverse events were arthralgia, back pain, pain in extremity, cough, and headache (each in
PubMed ID
20827547 View in PubMed
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Advances in upper airway diseases and allergen immunotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186402
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2003 Mar;111(3 Suppl):S793-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Harold S Nelson
Author Affiliation
National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, CO 80206, USA.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2003 Mar;111(3 Suppl):S793-8
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Sublingual
Administration, Topical
Allergens - administration & dosage - chemistry
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Asthma - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hydrocortisone
Immunization - methods
Liposomes
Oligonucleotides - chemistry
Rhinitis - pathology - therapy
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Skin Tests
Abstract
Epidemiologic studies continue to find an increased prevalence of rhinitis, asthma, and atopy in more westernized countries. Both allergic and nonallergic rhinitis are risk factors for development of asthma, particularly in adulthood. In patients who have both asthma and rhinitis, treatment of the latter decreases the likelihood of emergency department visits or hospitalization for asthma. The protective effect of intranasal cortico-steroids is much greater than that of antihistamines. This mirrors the effect on rhinitis symptoms, in which nasal corticosteroids are much more effective than antihistamines, leukotriene receptor antagonists, or the combination of both. In patients with severe asthma, sinus mucosal thickening on computed tomography (CT) correlates with the severity of lower airway disease indicated by sputum eosinophilia, exhaled nitrous oxide (NO), functional residual capacity, and diffusing capacity. Preseasonal specific immunotherapy (SIT) is less effective, but additive to treatment with omalizumab. It is also somewhat less effective in reducing nasal symptoms than nasal corticosteroids; however, it is superior to them for reducing lower airway inflammation. SIT in children with only allergic rhinitis reduces both the incidence of asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. High-dose sublingual immunotherapy appears to be safe and effective, but less effective than injection immunotherapy. It is not clear that there are cost savings with sublingual immunotherapy, as home administration savings may be offset by the much larger amount of allergen extracts required. New approaches to allergen immunotherapy, designed to increase efficacy and safety, include conjugation of allergens to immunostimulatory sequences and encapsulation in liposomes. Cross-reactivity between inhalants and foods demonstrated by skin prick tests is more predictive of clinically important sensitivity than is that demonstrated by RAST testing. The latter, because of cross-reacting profilins, is often clinically irrelevant.
PubMed ID
12618745 View in PubMed
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Adverse effects of tumour necrosis factor in cyclophosphamide-treated mice subjected to gut-derived Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207458
Source
Cytokine. 1997 Oct;9(10):763-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
T. Matsumoto
K. Tateda
S. Miyazaki
N. Furuya
A. Ohno
Y. Ishii
Y. Hirakata
K. Yamaguchi
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Toho University School of Medicine, Omori-Nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
Source
Cytokine. 1997 Oct;9(10):763-9
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage
Bacteremia - blood - etiology - microbiology - mortality
Colony Count, Microbial
Cyclophosphamide - pharmacology
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - pharmacology
Intestines - microbiology
Mice
Pseudomonas Infections - blood - etiology - microbiology - mortality
Recombinant Proteins - adverse effects
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - adverse effects - physiology
Abstract
To evaluate the role of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in gut-derived sepsis, mice were given Pseudomomas aeruginosa strain D4 by bacterial suspension in their drinking water during which time ampicillin (200 mg/kg) was given to disrupt the normal indigenous bacterial flora. Cyclophosphamide was additionally administered to induce bacterial translocation of the P. aeruginosa that had colonized the gastrointestinal tract, and thereby to cause gut-derived sepsis. In this model, TNF-alpha was detected in serum from the next day after the second cyclophosphamide administration, increasing to level of 3 ng/ml in lethal conditions. Average serum TNF-alpha level was significantly higher in mice with bacteraemia than in those without bacteraemia. Treatment with 0.8 microg/kg of recombinant human TNF-alpha (rhTNF-alpha) did not affect the mortality, whereas administration of either 4 and 20 microg/kg of rhTNF-alpha significantly increased the mortality rate in comparison with saline-treated mice. Bacterial counts in liver and blood were significantly higher in 20 microg/kg of rhTNF-alpha treated mice than in saline-treated mice. Treatment with murine anti-TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody significantly reduced the mortality from septic infection. We conclude that TNF-alpha may facilitate bacterial translocation and causes deterioration of gut-derived sepsis due to P. aeruginosa in mice.
PubMed ID
9344509 View in PubMed
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Alemtuzumab in clinical practice: a British Columbia experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159089
Source
Leuk Lymphoma. 2008 Feb;49(2):218-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
David Hui
Wendy Lam
Cynthia Toze
Michael Delorme
Michael Noble
Paul Klimo
Judy Sutherland
Karamjit Gill
Joseph Connors
Laurie Sehn
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Leuk Lymphoma. 2008 Feb;49(2):218-26
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Antibodies, Neoplasm - administration & dosage - adverse effects
British Columbia
Drug Evaluation
Female
Humans
Infection - chemically induced
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell - complications - drug therapy - mortality
Lymphoproliferative Disorders - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Mycosis Fungoides - drug therapy
Neutropenia - chemically induced
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Thrombocytopenia - chemically induced
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Limited information is available on alemtuzumab in the nonclinical trial setting. We evaluated its efficacy and safety in 42 consecutive unselected patients who received alemtuzumab monotherapy in British Columbia between October 2002 and August 2006. Information on patient demographics, baseline clinical characteristics, dose and schedule, clinical response, survival, and toxicities associated with alemtuzumab was collected retrospectively. Thirty-nine of 42 patients had chronic lymphocytic leukemia, two had mycosis fungoides, and one had T-cell post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. In contrast to previous reports, 42% were treated by community practitioners and 83% received alemtuzumab subcutaneously. The median time from diagnosis to alemtuzumab was 58 months. One of 42 patients (2%) achieved a complete response, 20 (48%) achieved a partial response, and 13 (31%) had stable disease. The post-alemtuzumab median overall survival was 15.1 months. Response to alemtuzumab correlated with an increased progression-free survival (11 vs. 3.6 months, p = 0.001) compared to that seen in non-responders. Significant adverse events included grade 3/4 neutropenia (76%), thrombocytopenia (45%), infections (60%) and death (12%). With careful monitoring, alemtuzumab can be safely administered in a wide variety of clinical settings, including community practice, and is associated with a high level of activity in situations with few available alternative treatment options.
Notes
Comment In: Leuk Lymphoma. 2008 Feb;49(2):175-618231900
PubMed ID
18231907 View in PubMed
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Allergen-specific Th1 cells counteract efferent Th2 cell-dependent bronchial hyperresponsiveness and eosinophilic inflammation partly via IFN-gamma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15527
Source
J Immunol. 2001 Jan 1;166(1):207-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2001
Author
T J Huang
P A MacAry
P. Eynott
A. Moussavi
K C Daniel
P W Askenase
D M Kemeny
K F Chung
Author Affiliation
Thoracic Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College School of Medicine, London, United Kingdom.
Source
J Immunol. 2001 Jan 1;166(1):207-17
Date
Jan-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adoptive Transfer
Allergens - administration & dosage - immunology
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - immunology - pathology - prevention & control
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - immunology
Cell Line
Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte - administration & dosage - immunology
Inflammation - immunology - pathology - prevention & control
Injections, Intravenous
Interferon Type II - immunology - physiology
Interleukin-4 - antagonists & inhibitors - genetics
Lung - cytology - immunology
Male
Ovalbumin - administration & dosage - immunology
Pulmonary Eosinophilia - immunology - pathology - prevention & control
RNA, Messenger - antagonists & inhibitors
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Th1 Cells - immunology - transplantation
Th2 Cells - immunology - transplantation
Abstract
Th2 T cell immune-driven inflammation plays an important role in allergic asthma. We studied the effect of counterbalancing Th1 T cells in an asthma model in Brown Norway rats that favors Th2 responses. Rats received i.v. transfers of syngeneic allergen-specific Th1 or Th2 cells, 24 h before aerosol exposure to allergen, and were studied 18-24 h later. Adoptive transfer of OVA-specific Th2 cells, but not Th1 cells, and OVA, but not BSA exposure, induced bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) to acetylcholine and eosinophilia in a cell number-dependent manner. Importantly, cotransfer of OVA-specific Th1 cells dose-dependently reversed BHR and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) eosinophilia, but not mucosal eosinophilia. OVA-specific Th1 cells transferred alone induced mucosal eosinophilia, but neither BHR nor BAL eosinophilia. Th1 suppression of BHR and BAL eosinophilia was allergen specific, since cotransfer of BSA-specific Th1 cells with the OVA-specific Th2 cells was not inhibitory when OVA aerosol alone was used, but was suppressive with OVA and BSA challenge. Furthermore, recipients of Th1 cells alone had increased gene expression for IFN-gamma in the lungs, while those receiving Th2 cells alone showed increased IL-4 mRNA. Importantly, induction of these Th2 cytokines was inhibited in recipients of combined Th1 and Th2 cells. Anti-IFN-gamma treatment attenuated the down-regulatory effect of Th1 cells. Allergen-specific Th1 cells down-regulate efferent Th2 cytokine-dependent BHR and BAL eosinophilia in an asthma model via mechanisms that depend on IFN-gamma. Therapy designed to control the efferent phase of established asthma by augmenting down-regulatory Th1 counterbalancing mechanisms should be effective.
PubMed ID
11123294 View in PubMed
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An amyloid-beta protofibril-selective antibody prevents amyloid formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98930
Source
Neurobiol Dis. 2009 Dec;36(3):425-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Anna Lord
Astrid Gumucio
Hillevi Englund
Dag Sehlin
Valentina Screpanti Sundquist
Linda Söderberg
Christer Möller
Pär Gellerfors
Lars Lannfelt
Frida Ekholm Pettersson
Lars N G Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Molecular Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Rudbeck Laboratory, Dag Hammarskjölds väg 20, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Neurobiol Dis. 2009 Dec;36(3):425-34
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Alzheimer Disease - metabolism - pathology - therapy
Amyloid - immunology - metabolism
Amyloid beta-Protein - immunology - metabolism - toxicity
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage - immunology - therapeutic use
Brain - immunology - metabolism - pathology
Disease Models, Animal
Humans
Immunization, Passive
Kinetics
Learning
Mice
Mice, Transgenic
Peptide Fragments - immunology - metabolism - toxicity
Protein Multimerization
Senile Plaques - immunology - metabolism - pathology
Space Perception
Abstract
Human genetics link Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis to excessive accumulation of amyloid-beta (Abeta) in brain, but the symptoms do not correlate with senile plaque burden. Since soluble Abeta aggregates can cause synaptic dysfunctions and memory deficits, these species could contribute to neuronal dysfunction and dementia. Here we explored selective targeting of large soluble aggregates, Abeta protofibrils, as a new immunotherapeutic strategy. The highly protofibril-selective monoclonal antibody mAb158 inhibited in vitro fibril formation and protected cells from Abeta protofibril-induced toxicity. When the mAb158 antibody was administered for 4 months to plaque-bearing transgenic mice with both the Arctic and Swedish mutations (tg-ArcSwe), Abeta protofibril levels were lowered while measures of insoluble Abeta were unaffected. In contrast, when treatment began before the appearance of senile plaques, amyloid deposition was prevented and Abeta protofibril levels diminished. Therapeutic intervention with mAb158 was however not proven functionally beneficial, since place learning depended neither on treatment nor transgenicity. Our findings suggest that Abeta protofibrils can be selectively cleared with immunotherapy in an animal model that display highly insoluble Abeta deposits, similar to those of Alzheimer's disease brain.
PubMed ID
19703562 View in PubMed
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Autoreactive T cells in mercury-induced autoimmunity. Ability to induce the autoimmune disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57821
Source
J Immunol. 1988 Feb 1;140(3):750-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1988
Author
L. Pelletier
R. Pasquier
J. Rossert
M C Vial
C. Mandet
P. Druet
Author Affiliation
Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Hôpital Broussais, Paris, France.
Source
J Immunol. 1988 Feb 1;140(3):750-4
Date
Feb-1-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage
Autoantigens - immunology
Autoimmune Diseases - chemically induced - etiology - immunology
Immunization, Passive
Lymphocyte Depletion
Male
Mercuric Chloride
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
T-Lymphocytes - immunology - transplantation
T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic - immunology
Abstract
It has been previously shown that autoreactive T cells appear during mercury-induced autoimmunity in Brown-Norway (BN) rats. In the present work, it is shown that: 1) T cells and T helper cells from HgCl2-injected BN rats are able to actively transfer autoimmunity in normal BN rats; the disease transferred is exacerbated when recipients are treated with the antisuppressor/cytotoxic T cell monoclonal antibody (OX8); 2) normal T cells preincubated with HgCl2 are also able to transfer the disease in OX8-treated but not in T cell-depleted rats; and 3) T cells from HgCl2-injected BN rats also transferred the disease in both normal and T cell depleted rats. It is concluded that: 1) autoreactive T cells, and presumably anti-Ia T cells are involved in the pathogenesis of mercury-induced autoimmunity; 2) these autoreactive T cells induce suppressor/cytotoxic T cells to proliferate in normal syngeneic recipients; the fact that this T cell subset did not proliferate in HgCl2-injected BN rats suggests that HgCl2 also affects T suppressor cells; and 3) mercury-induced autoimmunity could result from the additive effect of the emergence of autoreactive T cells and of a defect at the T suppressor level.
PubMed ID
3257501 View in PubMed
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Bevacizumab for advanced colorectal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176876
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2004 Dec;(63):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
A. Hadj Tahar
Source
Issues Emerg Health Technol. 2004 Dec;(63):1-4
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal - administration & dosage - adverse effects - economics - therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - adverse effects - economics - therapeutic use
Camptothecin - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic
Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic
Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic
Colorectal Neoplasms - drug therapy - etiology - pathology
Drug Approval
Fluorouracil - administration & dosage
Humans
Leucovorin - administration & dosage
Treatment Outcome
United States
United States Food and Drug Administration
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors
Abstract
Bevacizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It is thought that bevacizumab inhibits the formation of new blood vessels. Two clinical trials show that the addition of bevacizumab to a regimen of either fluorouracil plus leucovorin (FL) or FL combined with irinotecan (IFL), significantly improves response rate and time to tumour progression and increases overall survival for patients with advanced colorectal cancer (ACC). Thromboembolic events are the most clinically significant adverse events, but hypertension, hemorrhage and gastrointestinal perforation are other potential safety concerns. More studies are needed to compare the combination of bevacizumab plus IFL to other chemotherapy regimens used in the treatment of ACC. The addition of bevacizumab to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy regimens will significantly increase the costs of palliation for ACC.
PubMed ID
15612152 View in PubMed
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95 records – page 1 of 10.