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Canadian cost-utility analysis of initiation and maintenance treatment with anti-TNF-a drugs for refractory Crohn's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127813
Source
J Crohns Colitis. 2012 Feb;6(1):77-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Gord Blackhouse
Nazila Assasi
Feng Xie
John Marshall
E Jan Irvine
Kathryn Gaebel
Kaitryn Campbell
Rob Hopkins
Daria O'Reilly
Jean-Eric Tarride
Ron Goeree
Author Affiliation
Programs for Assessment of Technology in Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. blackhou@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Crohns Colitis. 2012 Feb;6(1):77-85
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal - economics - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized - economics - therapeutic use
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Crohn Disease - drug therapy - economics
Health Care Costs
Humans
Markov Chains
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Abstract
Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. Symptoms include but are not limited to abdominal pain, nausea, emesis, and diarrhea. Anti-TNF-a drugs are increasingly being used in patients with CD who have inadequate response to conventional therapy. However, these medications are quite expensive. The objective of this study is to evaluate the cost-utility of two anti-TNF-a drugs (infliximab, adalimumab) for refractory CD.
A Markov model was used to estimate the costs and QALYs of three treatments (usual care, infliximab, adalimumab) over a 5 year time horizon. After initial treatment, patients achieve remission, achieve treatment response or remain in the drug refractory health state. Patients who achieve remission or treatment response are at risk of relapse each 3 month model cycle. Patients in the drug refractory health state either remain in the health state or have surgery in each cycle. Different costs and utility values were assigned to the various model health states. Model input parameters including initial response rates, relapse rates, utility values were derived from published literature.
Usual care had both the lowest expected costs ($17,017) and QALYs (2.555), while infliximab had both the highest expected costs ($54,084) and QALYs (2.721). The incremental cost per QALY moving from usual care to adalimumab and from adalimumab to infliximab was estimated to be to be $193,305 and $451,165, respectively.
Based on common willingness to pay thresholds, ant-TNF-a drugs would not be perceived as a cost effective treatment for refractory CD.
PubMed ID
22261531 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness analysis of palivizumab as respiratory syncytial virus prophylaxis in preterm infants in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135458
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2011 Oct;100(10):1306-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Kristian Neovius
Katharina Buesch
Kristina Sandström
Martin Neovius
Author Affiliation
Snowbox Research AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2011 Oct;100(10):1306-14
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized - economics - therapeutic use
Antiviral Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Care Costs
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Premature, Diseases - economics - prevention & control
Markov Chains
Models, Biological
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - economics - prevention & control
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate the cost-effectiveness of palivizumab vs. no prophylaxis for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in preterm infants in Sweden.
A probabilistic Markov model was populated using a nationwide register linkage and data from the literature. Cost-effectiveness was investigated from a societal perspective over a lifetime for infants born at
Notes
Comment In: Acta Paediatr. 2011 Oct;100(10):1302-521781158
PubMed ID
21477089 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness of denosumab in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120144
Source
J Med Econ. 2012;15 Suppl 1:3-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
D. Chau
D L Becker
M E Coombes
G. Ioannidis
J D Adachi
R. Goeree
Author Affiliation
Amgen Canada Inc, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Med Econ. 2012;15 Suppl 1:3-14
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alendronate - economics - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized - economics - therapeutic use
Bone Density Conservation Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Etidronic Acid - analogs & derivatives - economics - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Markov Chains
Middle Aged
Models, Econometric
Ontario
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - drug therapy
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Abstract
Denosumab is a novel biologic agent approved in Canada for treatment of post-menopausal osteoporosis (PMO) in women at high risk for fracture or who have failed or are intolerant to other osteoporosis therapies. This study estimated cost-effectiveness of denosumab vs usual care from the perspective of the Ontario public payer.
A previously published PMO Markov cohort model was adapted for Canada to estimate cost-effectiveness of denosumab. The primary analysis included women with demographic characteristics similar to those from the pivotal phase III denosumab PMO trial (FREEDOM; age 72 years, femoral neck BMD T-score -2.16 SD, vertebral fracture prevalence 23.6%). Three additional scenario sub-groups were examined including women: (1) at high fracture risk, defined in FREEDOM as having at least two of three risk factors (age 70+; T-score = -3.0 SD at lumbar spine, total hip, or femoral neck; prevalent vertebral fracture); (2) age 75+; and (3) intolerant or contraindicated to oral bisphosphonates (BPs). Analyses were conducted over a lifetime horizon comparing denosumab to usual care ('no therapy', alendronate, risedronate, or raloxifene [sub-group 3 only]). The analysis considered treatment-specific persistence and post-discontinuation residual efficacy, as well as treatment-specific adverse events. Both deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted.
The multi-therapy comparisons resulted in incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for denosumab vs alendronate of $60,266 (2010 CDN$) (primary analysis) and $27,287 per quality-adjusted life year gained for scenario sub-group 1. Denosumab dominated all therapies in the remaining scenarios.
Key limitations include a lack of long-term, real-world, Canadian data on persistence with denosumab as well as an absence of head-to-head clinical data, leaving one to rely on meta-analyses based on trials comparing treatment to placebo.
Denosumab may be cost-effective compared to oral PMO treatments for women at high risk of fractures and those who are intolerant and/or contraindicated to oral BPs.
PubMed ID
23035625 View in PubMed
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Cost effectiveness of denosumab versus oral bisphosphonates for postmenopausal osteoporosis in the US.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108612
Source
Appl Health Econ Health Policy. 2013 Oct;11(5):485-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Anju Parthan
Morgan Kruse
Nicole Yurgin
Joice Huang
Hema N Viswanathan
Douglas Taylor
Author Affiliation
OptumInsight, Cambridge, MA, USA, anju.parthan@optum.com.
Source
Appl Health Econ Health Policy. 2013 Oct;11(5):485-97
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alendronate - economics - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized - economics - therapeutic use
Bone Density Conservation Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Diphosphonates - economics - therapeutic use
Drug Costs
Etidronic Acid - analogs & derivatives - economics - therapeutic use
Female
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Insurance, Health, Reimbursement - economics - statistics & numerical data
Markov Chains
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - economics - prevention & control
Sweden
Thiophenes - economics - therapeutic use
United States
Abstract
In the US, 26 % of women aged =65 years, and over 50 % of women aged =85 years are affected with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO). Each year, the total direct health care costs are estimated to be $US12-18 billion.
The cost effectiveness of denosumab versus oral bisphosphonates in postmenopausal osteoporotic women from a US third-party payer perspective was evaluated.
A lifetime cohort Markov model was developed with seven health states: 'well', hip fracture, vertebral fracture, 'other' osteoporotic fracture, post-hip fracture, post-vertebral fracture, and dead. During each cycle, patients could have a fracture, remain healthy, remain in a post-fracture state or die. Relative fracture risk reductions, background fracture risks, mortality rates, treatment-specific persistence rate, utilities, and medical and drug costs were derived using published sources. Expected costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were estimated for generic alendronate, denosumab, branded risedronate, and branded ibandronate in the overall PMO population and high-risk subgroups: (a) =2 of the following risks: >70 years of age, bone mineral density (BMD) T score less than or equal to -3.0, and prevalent vertebral fracture; and (b) =75 years of age. Costs and QALYs were discounted at 3 % annually, and all costs were inflated to 2012 US dollars. Sensitivity analyses were conducted by varying parameters e.g., efficacies of interventions, costs, utilities, and the medication persistence ratio.
In the overall PMO population, total lifetime costs for alendronate, denosumab, risedronate, and ibandronate were $US64,400, $US67,400, $US67,600 and $US69,200, respectively. Total QALYs were 8.2804, 8.3155, 8.2735 and 8.2691, respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for denosumab versus generic alendronate was $US85,100/QALY. Risedronate and ibandronate were dominated by denosumab. In the high-risk subgroup (a), total costs for alendronate, denosumab, risedronate and ibandronate were $US70,400, $US70,800, $US74,000 and $US76,900, respectively. Total QALYs were 7.2006, 7.2497, 7.1969 and 7.1841, respectively. Denosumab had an ICER of $US7,900/QALY versus generic alendronate and dominated all other strategies. Denosumab dominated all strategies in women aged =75 years. Base-case results between denosumab and generic alendronate were most sensitive to the relative risk of hip fracture for both drugs and the cost of denosumab.
In each PMO population examined, denosumab represented good value for money compared with branded bisphosphonates. Furthermore, denosumab was either cost effective or dominant compared with generic alendronate in the high-risk subgroups.
PubMed ID
23868102 View in PubMed
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The cost-effectiveness of TNF-inhibitors for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in Swedish clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120576
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2013 Dec;14(6):863-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Ingrid Lekander
Fredrik Borgström
Jörgen Lysholm
Ronald F van Vollenhoven
Staffan Lindblad
Pierre Geborek
Gisela Kobelt
Author Affiliation
LIME/MMC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden, ingrid.lekander@ki.se.
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2013 Dec;14(6):863-73
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Antibodies, Monoclonal - economics - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized - economics - therapeutic use
Antirheumatic Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Disease Progression
Drug Therapy, Combination
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - economics - therapeutic use
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor - therapeutic use
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Sweden
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - antagonists & inhibitors
Abstract
The objective was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of TNF-inhibitors for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in Swedish clinical practice, both as a first and second biological treatment, with or without the combination of conventional DMARDs. Further sub-group analysis of etanercept treatment was performed.
Patient level data were obtained from three regions of the Swedish Rheumatology Registers. The dataset contained 2,558 patients who had started TNF-inhibitor treatment, 1,049 with etanercept as their first biological treatment. A total of 819 patients had switched to a second TNF-inhibitor, of which 425 to etanercept. A Markov cohort model was used in which health states of disease severity were classified according to HAQ and DAS28. Disease progression and discontinuation rates of TNF-inhibitors were based on the registry and for the comparator on published literature. Mortality, costs and utilities were based on Swedish data. The main analysis had a societal perspective over 20 years and efficacy was measured in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs).
TNF-inhibitor treatment was associated with an increase in QALYs and an incremental cost compared to no biological treatment. The cost per QALY gained with the three TNF-inhibitors ranged from euro 50,000 to euro 120,000, with lower estimates for TNF-inhibitors used in combination with MTX and as a first biologic. At a progression of 0.045 for the comparator, most values remain within the accepted range for cost-effectiveness.
These results demonstrate that the cost per QALY for TNF-inhibitors was higher than in previous assessments based on registry data and that the results were sensitive to the HAQ progression of the comparator.
PubMed ID
22990378 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness of TNF inhibitors vs synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a Markov model study based on two longitudinal observational studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266276
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2015 Jul;54(7):1226-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Maria K Kvamme
Elisabeth Lie
Till Uhlig
Tron A Moger
Tore K Kvien
Ivar S Kristiansen
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2015 Jul;54(7):1226-35
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Monoclonal - economics - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized - economics - therapeutic use
Antirheumatic Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Biological Products - economics - therapeutic use
Cost-Benefit Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - economics - therapeutic use
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Markov Chains
Methotrexate - economics - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Norway
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - antagonists & inhibitors
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to estimate the additional costs and health benefits of adding a TNF inhibitor (TNFi) (adalimumab, certolizumab, etanercept, golimumab, infliximab) to a synthetic DMARD (sDMARD), e.g. MTX, in patients with RA.
We developed the Norwegian RA model as a Markov model simulating 10 years of treatment with either TNFi plus sDMARDs (TNFi strategy) or sDMARDs alone (synthetic strategy). Patients in both strategies started in one of seven health states, based on the Short Form-6 Dimensions (SF-6D). The patients could move to better or worse health states according to transition probabilities. In the TNFi strategy, patients could stay on TNFi (including switch of TNFi), or switch to non-TNFi-biologics (abatacept, rituximab, tocilizumab), sDMARDs or no DMARD. In the synthetic strategy, patients remained on sDMARDs. Data from two observational studies were used for the assessment of resource use and utilities in the health states. Health benefits were evaluated using the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) and SF-6D.
The Norwegian RA model predicted that 10-year discounted health care costs totalled €124,942 (€475,266 including production losses) for the TNFi strategy and €65,584 (€436,517) for the synthetic strategy. The cost per additionally gained quality-adjusted life-year of adding a TNFi was €92,557 (€60,227 including production losses) using SF-6D and €61,285 (€39,841) using EQ-5D. Including health care costs only, the probability that TNFi treatment was cost-effective was 90% when using EQ-5D, assuming a Norwegian willingness-to-pay level of €67,300.
TNFi treatment for RA is cost-effective when accounting for production losses. Excluding production losses, TNFi treatment is cost-effective using EQ-5D, but not SF-6D.
PubMed ID
25573840 View in PubMed
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Effect of treatment with natalizumab on ability to work in people with multiple sclerosis: productivity gain based on direct measurement of work capacity before and after 1 year of treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131053
Source
BioDrugs. 2011 Oct 1;25(5):299-306
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2011
Author
Sara Olofsson
Anne Wickström
Anna Häger Glenngård
Ulf Persson
Anders Svenningsson
Author Affiliation
The Swedish Institute for Health Economics (IHE), Lund, Sweden. so@ihe.se
Source
BioDrugs. 2011 Oct 1;25(5):299-306
Date
Oct-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized - economics - therapeutic use
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - drug therapy - economics
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Time Factors
Work - economics
Young Adult
Abstract
Sweden is a high endemic region for multiple sclerosis (MS), a neurologic disorder characterized by repeated inflammatory episodes affecting the CNS. The disease has its peak age of onset at approximately 30 years and affects women twice as often as men. The young age of onset makes MS one of the major causes of reduced capacity to work due to neurologic disease in Western society. Natalizumab (Tysabri®) is among the new generation of biologic drugs for the treatment of MS. Clinical studies have demonstrated that natalizumab is an effective treatment for preventing relapses and inflammatory activity.
The aim of the study was to estimate the monetary value of treatment with natalizumab on the ability to work in patients with MS in Sweden, based on a direct measurement of weekly hours worked before and after 1 year of treatment with natalizumab.
A sample of patients, consisting of all patients who had started treatment with natalizumab during the period June 2007-May 2008, was identified through the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Register (SMSreg). Data about sex, age, disease severity, and disease duration were collected from the register. Data about type of work and work capacity (number of hours worked per week) were collected retrospectively through a postal questionnaire. The average hours worked per week was estimated at baseline (2 weeks before treatment started) and at follow-up (50 weeks after treatment started), and the change was assigned an economic value using the human capital approach.
This study showed that after 50 weeks of treatment with natalizumab, people with MS increased their productivity by 3.3 hours per week on average (p?
PubMed ID
21942914 View in PubMed
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Incremental cost-effectiveness of the pre- and post-bevacizumab eras of metastatic colorectal cancer therapy in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127088
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2012 Sep;48(13):1969-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Lindsay Hedden
Hagen Kennecke
Diego Villa
Karrisa Johnston
Caroline Speers
Laurel Kovacic
Daniel J Renouf
Stuart Peacock
Author Affiliation
Canadian Centre for Applied Research in Cancer Control (ARCC), 2nd floor, BC Cancer Research Centre, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 1L3.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2012 Sep;48(13):1969-76
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angiogenesis Inhibitors - economics - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized - economics - therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols - economics
British Columbia
Colorectal Neoplasms - drug therapy - economics - mortality - pathology
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Markov Chains
Neoplasm Metastasis
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Bevacizumab, with 5-Fluorouracil-based therapy, has been shown to prolong survival among patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), at a relatively high cost. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of therapy for mCRC in the eras prior to, and following, the introduction of bevacizumab on a population basis.
All patients with newly-diagnosed mCRC in 2003/2004 (the pre-bevacizumab era) and 2006 (the post-bevacizumab era) referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency were included. A cost-utility/cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using 'real-world' data and a Markov approach. Costs were estimated from provincial pharmacy and radiation databases, as well as national inpatient, day-surgery and ambulatory care data sources. Cost per quality adjusted life year gained (QALY) and life year gained (LYG) ratios were calculated, and one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted to test the robustness of the model.
Median overall survival improved from 15.6 to 19.5 months (p = 0.03). For patients in the post-bevacizumab era there was a gain of an average of 0.06 QALYs or 0.325 LYG at a cost increase of $3791 per patient, resulting in a incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $62,469/QALY or $15,617/LYG. This improved to $43,058/QALY or $10,764/LYG when the analysis was restricted to patients potentially eligible for bevacizumab. Results were generally robust to changes in model parameters, but were sensitive to the costs of chemotherapy and to differential utilities used in the Markov model.
The introduction of bevacizumab was associated with increased costs, but cost-effectiveness estimates were in-line with those reported for other cancer therapies.
PubMed ID
22325838 View in PubMed
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Palivizumab and respiratory syncytial virus disease: selling sickness for future?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259353
Source
Int J Risk Saf Med. 2014;26(1):39-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ekaterina V Yudina
Liliya E Ziganshina
Source
Int J Risk Saf Med. 2014;26(1):39-43
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized - economics - therapeutic use
Antiviral Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Drug Approval
Drug and Narcotic Control - organization & administration
Economics, Pharmaceutical - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - prevention & control
Russia
Abstract
Over the past two decades Russia has gone through dramatic "democratic" changes resulting in unprecedented deterioration of health, loss of lives and extinction of population. The health system turned into a ridiculous monster of poorly organized business exploiting reminiscent social values of the past to build profits on selling sickness-for-all in consumer culture. We present facts and conclude that introduction of palivizumab into clinical practice for the most vulnerable patient category was done without confirmation of efficacy, without pharmacoeconomics evaluations, without any precautionary measures in a country with undeveloped pharmacovigilance system. The situation calls for immediate action of responsible authorities and the society as a whole.
PubMed ID
24796349 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.