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The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for invasive pneumococcal disease in Alaska native children: results of a clinical trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120452
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013 Mar;32(3):257-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013

Accelerated decline in Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence rate during the screen and treat project in Vammala, Finland, as demonstrated in 29- to 45-year-old pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181548
Source
APMIS. 2004 Jan;112(1):34-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Leena Rehnberg-Laiho
Anniina Salomaa
Hilpi Rautelin
Pentti Koskela
Seppo Sarna
Timo U Kosunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, Haartman Institute, Haartmaninkatu 3, 00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
APMIS. 2004 Jan;112(1):34-8
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Helicobacter pylori - isolation & purification
Humans
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - microbiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Stomach Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Urban Population
Abstract
The potential preventability of serious helicobacter-associated diseases - especially gastric cancer - has evoked interest in eradicating this pathogen from the population. We assessed the efficacy of the pioneering screen and treat intervention project in Vammala by studying helicobacter seroprevalence in pregnant women representing the normal population. Consecutive maternity clinic samples from native Finnish females at five different localities in 1995 (n=701) and 2000 (n=772) were investigated for class IgG H. pylori antibodies by enzyme immunoassay (Pyloriset EIA-G III, Orion Diagnostica, Espoo, Finland). In Vammala the change in helicobacter seroprevalence was -13%-units (between 1995 and 2000; p=0.0125, chi-square test) in > or =29-year-old females, +1.6%-units (difference statistically non-significant) in
PubMed ID
14961972 View in PubMed
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Acute Chlamydia pneumoniae infections in asthmatic and non-asthmatic military conscripts during a non-epidemic period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159887
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2008 Mar;14(3):207-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
R. Juvonen
A. Bloigu
M. Paldanius
A. Peitso
S. Silvennoinen-Kassinen
T. Harju
M. Leinonen
P. Saikku
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Kainuu Central Hospital, Kajaani, Finland. raija.juvonen@kainuu.fi
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2008 Mar;14(3):207-12
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Asthma - complications
Chlamydophila Infections - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology - physiopathology
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - immunology - isolation & purification
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Pneumonia, Bacterial - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Tract Infections - microbiology
Sinusitis - microbiology
Abstract
Chlamydia pneumoniae respiratory tract infections were studied in 512 male military conscripts (123 asthmatic and 389 non-asthmatic) taking part in 180-day service between July 2004 and July 2005 in Kajaani, Finland. Respiratory tract infections requiring a medical consultation were analysed prospectively. At baseline, at end of service, and during each episode of respiratory infection, blood samples were obtained for measurement of C. pneumoniae antibodies. Data concerning the clinical features of each infection episode were collected. Serological evidence of acute C. pneumoniae infection was found in 34 of the 512 conscripts with antibody data available, including 9.8% of the asthmatic subjects and 5.7% of the non-asthmatic subjects (p 0.111). A serological diagnosis could be made for 25 clinical episodes in 24 conscripts. The spectrum of respiratory tract infections included 13 episodes of mild upper respiratory tract infection and seven episodes of sinusitis, with five episodes involving asthma exacerbation. Two of three pneumonias were primary infections. Primary infections were diagnosed in five subjects, and re-infection/reactivation in 19 subjects, with the latter comprising 12 non-asthmatic subjects and seven asthmatic subjects (p 0.180). Prolonged infections were present in six asthmatic subjects and one non-asthmatic subject (p 0.001). A wide variety of respiratory tract infections, ranging from common cold to pneumonia, were associated with serologically confirmed C. pneumoniae infections. Infections were often mild, with common cold and sinusitis being the most common manifestations. Acute, rapidly resolved C. pneumoniae infections were equally common among asthmatic subjects and non-asthmatic subjects, whereas prolonged infections were more common among subjects with asthma.
PubMed ID
18070131 View in PubMed
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Acute Q fever: a cause of fatal hepatitis in an Icelandic traveller.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19806
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2001;33(4):314-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
H J Isaksson
J. Hrafnkelsson
I. Hilmarsdóttir
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, National University Hospital, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2001;33(4):314-5
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Fatal Outcome
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Hepatitis - complications
Humans
Iceland
Liver Failure - complications
Male
Q Fever - blood - complications
Travel
Abstract
Domestic Q fever is rare in the Nordic countries; the infection is acquired abroad in the majority of cases. This is the first Nordic report of a fatal case of Q fever, which occurred in an Icelandic cancer patient who had travelled to the Canary Islands.
PubMed ID
11345226 View in PubMed
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Acute tick-borne rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia heilongjiangensis in Russian Far East.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179613
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 May;10(5):810-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Oleg Y Mediannikov
Yuri Sidelnikov
Leonid Ivanov
Eugenia Mokretsova
Pierre-Edouard Fournier
Irina Tarasevich
Didier Raoult
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Rickettsial Ecology, Gamaleya Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology, Moscow, Russia. olegusss1@mail.ru
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2004 May;10(5):810-7
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
DNA, Bacterial - analysis - isolation & purification
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Rickettsia - classification - genetics - immunology
Rickettsia Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - physiopathology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Siberia - epidemiology
Tick-Borne Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - physiopathology
Abstract
An acute tick-borne rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia heilongjiangensis was diagnosed in 13 patients from the Russian Far East in 2002. We amplified and sequenced four portions of three rickettsial genes from the patients' skin biopsy results and blood samples and showed that the amplified rickettsial genes belong to R. heilongjiangensis, which was recently isolated from Dermacentor sylvarum ticks in nearby regions of China. This rickettsia, belonging to subgroup of R. japonica, was previously suggested to be pathogenic for humans on the basis of serologic findings. We tested serum samples with different rickettsial antigens from 11 patients and confirmed increasing titers of immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgM to spotted fever group rickettsiae, including R. heilongjiangensis. Clinical and epidemiologic data on these patients show that this disease is similar to other tick-borne rickettsioses.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15200813 View in PubMed
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Adverse pregnancy outcomes and Coxiella burnetii antibodies in pregnant women, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259464
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2014 Jun;20(6):925-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Stine Yde Nielsen
Kåre Mølbak
Tine Brink Henriksen
Karen Angeliki Krogfelt
Carsten Schade Larsen
Steen Villumsen
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2014 Jun;20(6):925-31
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Coxiella burnetii - immunology - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
DNA, Bacterial - urine
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology
Q Fever - complications - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology
Risk
Notes
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PubMed ID
24856281 View in PubMed
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Allergic sensitization and microbial load--a comparison between Finland and Russian Karelia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165130
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2007 Apr;148(1):47-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
T. Seiskari
A. Kondrashova
H. Viskari
M. Kaila
A-M Haapala
J. Aittoniemi
M. Virta
M. Hurme
R. Uibo
M. Knip
H. Hyöty
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, University of Tampere, Finland. tapio.seiskari@uta.fi
Source
Clin Exp Immunol. 2007 Apr;148(1):47-52
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Antibodies, Protozoan - blood
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Betula - immunology
Cats - immunology
Child
Enterovirus B, Human - immunology - isolation & purification
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori - immunology - isolation & purification
Hepatitis A virus - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Hypersensitivity - ethnology - immunology - microbiology
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Male
Ovalbumin - immunology
Pollen - immunology
Russia - epidemiology
Toxoplasma - immunology - isolation & purification
Viruses - isolation & purification
Abstract
Epidemiological data have indicated that some infections are associated with a low risk of allergic diseases, thus supporting the idea (hygiene hypothesis) that the microbial load is an important environmental factor conferring protection against the development of allergies. We set out to test the hygiene hypothesis in a unique epidemiological setting in two socio-economically and culturally markedly different, although genetically related, populations living in geographically adjacent areas. The study cohorts included 266 schoolchildren from the Karelian Republic in Russia and 266 schoolchildren from Finland. The levels of total IgE and allergen-specific IgE for birch, cat and egg albumen were measured. Microbial antibodies were analysed against enteroviruses (coxsackievirus B4), hepatitis A virus, Helicobacter pylori and Toxoplasma gondii. Although total IgE level was higher in Russian Karelian children compared to their Finnish peers, the prevalence of allergen-specific IgE was lower among Russian Karelian children. The prevalence of microbial antibodies was, in turn, significantly more frequent in the Karelian children, reflecting the conspicuous difference in socio-economic background factors. Microbial infections were associated with lower risk of allergic sensitization in Russian Karelian children, enterovirus showing the strongest protective effect in a multivariate model. The present findings support the idea that exposure to certain infections, particularly in childhood, may protect from the development of atopy. Enterovirus infections represent a new candidate to the list of markers of such a protective environment. However, possible causal relationship needs to be confirmed in further studies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17302731 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of Helicobacter pylori infection prevalence in children in the contemporary period].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125896
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2012 Jan-Feb;(1):83-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
A V Svarval'
R S Ferman
A B Zhebrun
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2012 Jan-Feb;(1):83-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood - immunology
Antigens, Bacterial - blood - immunology
Bacterial Proteins - blood - immunology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Feces - microbiology
Female
Helicobacter Infections - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology
Helicobacter pylori - immunology - pathogenicity
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood - immunology
Male
Overweight
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Schools
Abstract
Study of prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in one organized children community of St. Petersburg in the current period.
390 children and adolescents of one of the general education schools of St. Petersburg were examined. Presence in blood sera of IgG to bacterial antigen of H. pylori and IgG to its CagA toxin by ELISA method was studied. In 222 children feces samples were studied. Determination of presence of H. pylori antigen in the feces was carried out by using Helicobacter pylori antigen ELISA Kit, Immundiagnostik test system.
Comparison of H. pylori infection prevalence in children of various age revealed that infection is minimal in children aged 7 - 8 years (36.84%) and reaches maximum levels in students aged 14 years (66.67%). Screening result shows that there are 2 waves of H. pylori infection (the first peak was detected in 11 years, the second - in 14 years). Excess weight in H. pylori positive students is present less frequently (19.89% versus 30.13%). The difference is more notable in boys (20.25% and 38.75% respectively).
A sufficiently high level of infectivity by H. pylori in the students of this school was detected. It was established, that seropositivity increases with student age and reaches maximum levels in upperclassmen. 2 waves of H. pylori infection curve are noticed. It was detected that excess weight occurs more frequently in children not infected by helicobater (p
PubMed ID
22442977 View in PubMed
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484 records – page 1 of 49.