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267 records – page 1 of 27.

[A case of Lyme borreliosis which was suspected to be caused by Borrelia japonica infection in Shizuoka, Japan]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34907
Source
Kansenshogaku Zasshi. 1996 Mar;70(3):264-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
T. Masuzawa
Y. Yanagihara
H. Fujita
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Japan.
Source
Kansenshogaku Zasshi. 1996 Mar;70(3):264-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Borrelia - immunology
Borrelia Infections - immunology - microbiology
Child
English Abstract
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Japan
Lyme Disease - immunology - microbiology
Abstract
We report a case of Lyme borreliosis (Lyme disease) found in Shizuoka City, Japan which was suspected to be caused by Borrelia japonica infection. A 8-year-old female was bitten on her head by a tick at a camping ground, near Tamagawa, Shizuoka. The tick was removed by the patient and was discarded before species identification. After one week, lymph node swelling with tenderness developed on her left neck. She consulted a local pediatrician and was suspected to have upper respiratory infection. As oral antibiotic, cefaclor was not effective, the patient was referred to us. The patient's serum showed positive reaction with Lyme Borreliosis ELISA kit (Dakopatts, Denmark) using Borrelia burgdorferi flagellum as antigen. The serum also gave positive results with home-made ELISA to B. japonica strain IKA2, which was isolated from I. ovatus, but not with other borrelial strain isolated in the United States, Europe, and from I. persulcatus and wild rodent in Japan. In western blotting, the serum reacted with flagellin and outer surface protein A (OspA) of B. japonica. We diagnosed her as Lyme disease and got a successful result with oral penicillin, sultamicillin. From a result of our field tick survey, we have not collected I. persulcatus around the area where the patient had a tick bite. These findings indicated that Lyme disease was caused by B. japonica infection with I. ovatus bite.
PubMed ID
8621970 View in PubMed
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Source
Ter Arkh. 2000;72(11):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
V G Barskova
L P Anan'eva
E S Fedorov
O A Cheprova
V A Nasonova
Source
Ter Arkh. 2000;72(11):30-3
Date
2000
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Borrelia burgdorferi Group - immunology
Child
Disease Progression
Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect
Humans
Incidence
Lyme Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Comparison of clinical symptoms in Lyme disease (LD) in various age groups.
150 patients with verified LD were divided into 4 age groups: under 15 years (group 1), 16-40 years (group 2), 41-60 years (group 3), over 60 years (group 4). Antibodies to Borrelia burgdorteri were detected with indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot.
LD clinical symptoms differed in the age groups. Patients of group 1 had more prevalent infectious syndrome with fever but they had no radiculoneuritis and polyneuritis. Patients of group 2 more frequently suffered of carditis and secondary erythema. Groups 3 and 4 were characterized by infectious syndrome, secondary erythema and aseptic meningitis, joint lesions being more frequent in group 3, nervous system lesions--in group 4.
Age peculiarities of LD symptoms are very important. In particular, joint syndrome is responsible for lingering course of LD.
PubMed ID
11270952 View in PubMed
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Age-dependent increase of Campylobacter pylori antibodies in blood donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231679
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1989 Jan;24(1):110-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1989
Author
T U Kosunen
J. Höök
H I Rautelin
G. Myllylä
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Bacteriology and Immunology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1989 Jan;24(1):110-4
Date
Jan-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Blood Donors
Campylobacter - immunology
Female
Finland
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
Antibodies against Campylobacter pylori were determined in 500 blood donors aged 18 to 65 years. Acid extract from a C. pylori strain was used as antigen in enzyme immunoassay. The proportion of donors with high antibody titers increased with age. For IgG antibodies it was 10% in the age group from 18 to 25 years but 60% in the group from 56 to 65 years; the increase for IgA and IgM antibodies was from 5 to 42% and from 7 to 21%, respectively. The geometric mean titers of those with high values showed no clear changes with age, which would imply chronic antigenic stimulus.
PubMed ID
2648556 View in PubMed
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Age specific prevalence of antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35988
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1994;26(4):393-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
S. Einarsson
H K Sigurdsson
S D Magnusdottir
H. Erlendsdottir
H. Briem
S. Gudmundsson
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland Medical School, Reykjavik.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1994;26(4):393-7
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - immunology
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - immunology
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - immunology
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Chlamydia pneumoniae is a newly recognized common cause of respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to examine its prevalence in Iceland. The study was based on 1020 serum samples from individuals 0-99 years old. The samples were divided into 10-year age groups. IgG and IgM antibodies were determined with microimmunofluorescence assay. An IgG titer > or = 32 and IgM titer > or = 16 were considered positive. The prevalence of positive IgG titer in the study population was 53 +/- 16% (mean +/- SD, age group range 14-66%). Neither seasonal nor gender-based difference in IgG antibody prevalence was demonstrated. It was lowest in the youngest group, 0-9 years old (p
PubMed ID
7984969 View in PubMed
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Agglutinins and antibodies to Francisella tularensis outer membrane antigens in the early diagnosis of disease during an outbreak of tularemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38538
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1988 Mar;26(3):433-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1988
Author
L. Bevanger
J A Maeland
A I Naess
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Trondheim, Norway.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1988 Mar;26(3):433-7
Date
Mar-1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Agglutination Tests
Agglutinins - analysis
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Antigens, Bacterial - immunology
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - immunology
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Francisella tularensis - immunology
Humans
Immunoassay
Immunoglobulins - immunology
Middle Aged
Norway
Tularemia - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Tularemia was diagnosed in 57 patients during an outbreak in central Norway in 1984 and 1985. Clinical categories of the disease showed seasonal variations. A bacterial microagglutination test and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with class-specific antibodies against Francisella tularensis outer membrane (OM) antigens were evaluated for the early diagnosis of tularemia. ELISA with immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgA, or IgM antibodies and the microagglutination test differed only marginally in diagnostic sensitivity. The OM preparation harbored F. tularensis agglutinogens and contained a variety of proteins, several of which functioned as immunogens in tularemia patients, as shown by Western blotting (immunoblotting). All 12 patients tested produced antibodies against a 43,000-molecular-weight OM protein. Individual variation was noted with regard to antibody response against other OM antigens. The OM is a suitable antigen preparation in ELISA for the diagnosis of tularemia and, presumably, contains antigens important in the immunobiology of tularemia.
PubMed ID
3356786 View in PubMed
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[A Legionella circulation study in the central Volga Valley area].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220029
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1993 Nov-Dec;(6):52-3
Publication Type
Article

[A method of isolating the main outer membrane protein of Chlamydia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57559
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 1998 May-Jun;60(3):85-90
Publication Type
Article
Author
O P Bilozorov
Author Affiliation
Ukrainian Research Institute of Dermatology and Venerology, Ministry of Health of Ukraine, Kharkiv.
Source
Mikrobiol Z. 1998 May-Jun;60(3):85-90
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - analysis - immunology - isolation & purification
Chick Embryo
Chlamydia trachomatis - immunology
Culture Media
English Abstract
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Immune Sera - isolation & purification
Immunization
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Rabbits
Solubility
Abstract
Purified chlamydial bodies were solubilized by detergent solutions used in the following sequence: 1) 1% sarcosil, 2) 1% sarcosil + 10 mM dithiotreitol, 3) 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate + 10 mM dithiotreitol. After the third stage a good yield of protein, corresponding to major outer membrane protein as to its molecular weight and antigenic properties was obtained.
PubMed ID
9785804 View in PubMed
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Analysis of meningococcal serogroup C-specific antibody levels in British Columbian children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212334
Source
J Infect Dis. 1996 Apr;173(4):1009-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
L A Mitchell
J J Ochnio
C. Glover
A Y Lee
M K Ho
A. Bell
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
J Infect Dis. 1996 Apr;173(4):1009-13
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Bacterial Capsules - immunology
Bacterial Vaccines - therapeutic use
Blood Bactericidal Activity
British Columbia
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Immunization
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Neisseria meningitidis - immunology - pathogenicity
Time Factors
Abstract
The effects of age, sex, and possible prior exposure to serogroup C meningococci on group C-specific antibody levels (total and functional) were examined in 2- to 19-year-olds just before and 1 and 12 months after immunization with divalent (groups A + C) meningococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine. Only age was found to have a significant effect on antibody levels. At 1 month, only 50% of 2- to 6-year-olds had detectable serum bactericidal antibody, in contrast to 84.1% and 96.3% of 9- to 12- and 13- to 19-year-olds respectively. By 12 months, only 20%, 40.9%, and 53.8% of subjects in these age groups had serum bactericidal antibody, suggesting that current meningococcal C polysaccharide vaccines provide only short-term protection. However, the drop in total specific antibody levels (by EIA) was less pronounced. Persistence of antibodies detectable by EIA (but not serum bactericidal antibodies) suggests that this vaccine may also give rise to antibodies of low affinity or directed to nonfunctional (nonprotective) epitopes (or both).
PubMed ID
8603941 View in PubMed
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An epidemic of mild pneumonia due to an unusual strain of Chlamydia psittaci.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238877
Source
J Infect Dis. 1985 May;151(5):832-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1985
Author
P. Saikku
S P Wang
M. Kleemola
E. Brander
E. Rusanen
J T Grayston
Source
J Infect Dis. 1985 May;151(5):832-9
Date
May-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Chlamydophila psittaci - immunology
Complement Fixation Tests
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Disease Reservoirs
Female
Finland
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Humans
Male
Pneumonia - epidemiology - etiology - radiography
Psittacosis - epidemiology - etiology - radiography
Abstract
An epidemic of mild pneumonia was discovered during a chest radiographic survey of adolescents and young adults in two communities 110 kilometers apart in northern Finland. Antibodies to chlamydial antigens were found in 32 of 34 persons with pneumonitis. Microimmunofluorescence antibody tests suggest that the etiologic agent is closely related or identical to TW-183, an unusual strain of Chlamydia psittaci isolated from the eye of a child in Taiwan. The point prevalence of pneumonitis with antibody to TW-183 in school children at the time of the survey was high-15 and 19 patients per 1,000 students in the two communities. There was no evidence of avian transmission in the epidemic.
PubMed ID
3886806 View in PubMed
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267 records – page 1 of 27.