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[Analysis of structure and causes of mortality of HIV-infected in Volga Federal District in 2005 - 2010].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123479
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2012 Mar-Apr;(2):39-43
Publication Type
Article
Author
E E Kuzovatova
N N Zaitseva
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2012 Mar-Apr;(2):39-43
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Retroviral Agents - administration & dosage
Female
HIV Infections - complications - drug therapy - mortality
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Tuberculosis - drug therapy - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Among with morbidity and affection, mortality is an objective indicator of HIV-infection epidemic process intensity. Dynamics of mortality of HIV-infected in Volga Federal District (VFD) in 2005 - 2010, distribution of deceased by disease stage, period of start and coverage by antiretroviral therapy were studied based on approved statistical forms and additional collected data, the leading causes of death were revealed, comparative analysis with population of HIV-infected in penitentiary system institutions was performed. All-cause mortality was established to have dynamics of growth in HIV-infected population in VFD in 2005 - 2010, at the same time HIV-infection mortality has a certain tendency of stabilization after 2007 with subsequent decline in 2010, that apparently is related to wide use of combined antiretroviral therapy. HIV-infection mortality among HIV-infected in penitentiary system of the district is significantly higher than mortality in the general population of HIV-infected in VFD. The leading cause of death in HIV-infection is tuberculosis.
PubMed ID
22693809 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antiretroviral treatment interruption leads to progression of liver fibrosis in HIV-hepatitis C virus co-infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136924
Source
AIDS. 2011 Apr 24;25(7):967-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-24-2011
Author
Julia Thorpe
Sahar Saeed
Erica E M Moodie
Marina B Klein
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Divisions of Infectious Diseases/Immunodeficiency, Royal Victoria Hospital, Canada.
Source
AIDS. 2011 Apr 24;25(7):967-75
Date
Apr-24-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Retroviral Agents - administration & dosage
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes
Canada
Disease Progression
Female
HIV Infections - complications - drug therapy - immunology
HIV-1
Hepacivirus
Hepatitis C - complications - drug therapy - immunology
Humans
Liver - immunology
Liver Cirrhosis - etiology - immunology - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Viral Load
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
Despite potential negative consequences, HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients may discontinue antiretroviral treatment (ART) for several reasons. We examined the impact of ART interruption on liver fibrosis progression in co-infected adults, using the aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) as a surrogate marker of liver fibrosis.
Data were analyzed from a multisite prospective cohort of 541 HIV-HCV co-infected adults. ART interruption was included as a time-updated variable and defined as the cessation of all antiretrovirals for at least 14 days. The primary endpoint was the development of an APRI score at least 1.5. Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards regression and inverse probability-of-treatment weighting (IPTW) in a marginal structural model were used to evaluate the association of baseline and time-varying covariates with developing significant fibrosis.
Patients were followed for a median of 1.02 years; 10% (n = 53) interrupted ART and 10% (n = 53) developed significant fibrosis. After accounting for potential confounders, including CD4 T-cell count, HIV viral load, baseline APRI score, age and gender, the hazard ratio for ART interruption was 2.52 (95% confidence interval 1.20-5.28). Use of IPTW resulted in a similar effect estimate, suggesting that mediation by time-varying confounders was negligible.
ART interruption was associated with an increased risk of fibrosis progression in HIV-HCV co-infection that was only partially accounted for by HIV viral load and CD4 T-cell counts. Our findings suggest that liver disease progression observed in ART-treated co-infected patients is partly due to the consequences of treatment interruptions.
PubMed ID
21330904 View in PubMed
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Association between U.S. state AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) features and HIV antiretroviral therapy initiation, 2001-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106044
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(11):e78952
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
David B Hanna
Kate Buchacz
Kelly A Gebo
Nancy A Hessol
Michael A Horberg
Lisa P Jacobson
Gregory D Kirk
Mari M Kitahata
P Todd Korthuis
Richard D Moore
Sonia Napravnik
Pragna Patel
Michael J Silverberg
Timothy R Sterling
James H Willig
Ann Collier
Hasina Samji
Jennifer E Thorne
Keri N Althoff
Jeffrey N Martin
Benigno Rodriguez
Elizabeth A Stuart
Stephen J Gange
Author Affiliation
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America ; Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, United States of America.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(11):e78952
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - drug therapy - economics
Anti-Retroviral Agents - administration & dosage - economics
Canada
Female
Government Programs
Healthcare Financing
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
United States
Abstract
U.S. state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAPs) are federally funded to provide antiretroviral therapy (ART) as the payer of last resort to eligible persons with HIV infection. States differ regarding their financial contributions to and ways of implementing these programs, and it remains unclear how this interstate variability affects HIV treatment outcomes.
We analyzed data from HIV-infected individuals who were clinically-eligible for ART between 2001 and 2009 (i.e., a first reported CD4+
Notes
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PubMed ID
24260137 View in PubMed
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Association of age with polypharmacy and risk of drug interactions with antiretroviral medications in HIV-positive patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105929
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2013 Nov;47(11):1429-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Alice Tseng
Leah Szadkowski
Sharon Walmsley
Irving Salit
Janet Raboud
Author Affiliation
Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, ON, Canada.
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2013 Nov;47(11):1429-39
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Retroviral Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Interactions
Female
HIV Infections - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Polypharmacy
Tertiary Care Centers
Young Adult
Abstract
Interactions between antiretroviral (ARV) therapy and medications to treat age-related comorbidities are a growing concern in the aging HIV population.
To investigate the association of age with potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) involving ARVs.
We studied ARV-treated patients attending a tertiary care center. PDDIs were classified as "red flag" (contraindicated) or "orange flag" (use with caution or dose adjustment). Logistic regression was used to determine the association of age with the occurrence of =1 PDDI.
Of 914 patients (78% male, median age 49 years), older patients (age =50 years) were on more drugs than younger patients (total 9 vs 7; P
PubMed ID
24285760 View in PubMed
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Effect of treatment interruption and intensification of antiretroviral therapy on health-related quality of life in patients with advanced HIV: a randomized, controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136391
Source
Med Decis Making. 2012 Jan-Feb;32(1):70-82
Publication Type
Article
Author
Vilija R Joyce
Paul G Barnett
Adam Chow
Ahmed M Bayoumi
Susan C Griffin
Huiying Sun
Mark Holodniy
Sheldon T Brown
Tassos C Kyriakides
D William Cameron
Mike Youle
Mark Sculpher
Aslam H Anis
Douglas K Owens
Author Affiliation
VA Palo Alto Health Care System, VA Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center, VA HSR&D Health Economics Resource Center, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. vilija.joyce@va.gov
Source
Med Decis Making. 2012 Jan-Feb;32(1):70-82
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Retroviral Agents - administration & dosage
Canada
Continuity of Patient Care
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Great Britain
HIV Infections - drug therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life - psychology
Severity of Illness Index
United States
Abstract
The effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption or intensification on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in advanced HIV patients is unknown.
To assess the impact of temporary treatment interruption and intensification of ART on HRQoL.
A 2 x 2 factorial open label randomized controlled trial.
Hospitals in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom.
Multidrug resistant (MDR) HIV patients.
Patients were randomized to receive a 12-wk interruption or not, and ART intensification or standard ART.
The Health Utilities Index (HUI3), EQ-5D, standard gamble (SG), time tradeoff (TTO), visual analog scale (VAS), and the Medical Outcomes Study HIV Health Survey (MOS-HIV).
There were no significant differences in HRQoL among the four groups during follow-up; however, there was a temporary significant decline in HRQoL on some measures within the interruption group during interruption (HUI3 -0.05, P = 0.03; VAS -5.9, P = 0.002; physical health summary -2.9, P = 0.001; mental health summary -1.9, P = 0.02). Scores declined slightly overall during follow-up. Multivariate analysis showed significantly lower HRQoL associated with some clinical events. Limitations. The results may not apply to HIV patients who have not experienced multiple treatment failures or who have not developed MDR HIV.
Temporary ART interruption and ART intensification provided neither superior nor inferior HRQoL compared with no interruption and standard ART. Among surviving patients, HRQoL scores declined only slightly over years of follow-up in this advanced HIV cohort; however, approximately one-third of patients died during the trial follow up. Lower HRQoL was associated with adverse clinical events.
PubMed ID
21383086 View in PubMed
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Exploring disability from the perspective of adults living with HIV/AIDS: development of a conceptual framework.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154890
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2008;6:76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Kelly K O'Brien
Ahmed M Bayoumi
Carol Strike
Nancy L Young
Aileen M Davis
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. kelly.obrien@utoronto.ca
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2008;6:76
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - drug therapy - physiopathology - psychology
Adult
Anti-Retroviral Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Canada
Disabled Persons - psychology
Drug Combinations
Episode of Care
Female
Focus Groups
HIV Infections - drug therapy - physiopathology - psychology
HIV Long-Term Survivors - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Psychometrics - methods
Quality of Life
Sickness Impact Profile
Terminology as Topic
Abstract
Since the advent of combination antiretroviral therapy, in developed countries HIV increasingly is perceived as a long-term illness. Individuals may experience health-related consequences of HIV and its associated treatments, a concept that may be termed disability. To date, a comprehensive framework for understanding the health-related consequences experienced by people living with HIV has not been developed. The purpose of this research was to develop a conceptual framework of disability from the perspective of adults living with HIV.
We conducted four focus groups and 15 face-to-face interviews with 38 adults living with HIV. We asked participants to describe their health-related challenges, their physical, social and psychological areas of life affected, and impact on their overall health. We analyzed data using grounded theory techniques. We also conducted two validity check focus groups with seven returning participants.
Disability was conceptualized by participants as multi-dimensional and episodic characterized by unpredictable periods of wellness and illness. The Episodic Disability Framework consisted of three main components: a) dimensions of disability that included symptoms and impairments, difficulties carrying out day-to-day activities, challenges to social inclusion, and uncertainty that may fluctuate on a daily basis and over the course of living with HIV, b) contextual factors that included extrinsic factors (social support and stigma) and intrinsic factors (living strategies and personal attributes) that may exacerbate or alleviate disability, and c) triggers that initiate momentous or major episodes of disability such as receiving an HIV diagnosis, starting or changing medications, experiencing a serious illness, and suffering a loss of others.
The Episodic Disability Framework considers the variable nature of disability, acknowledges uncertainty as a key component, describes contextual factors that influence experiences of disability, and considers life events that may initiate a major or momentous episode. This framework presents a new way to conceptualize disability based on the experience of living with HIV.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18834538 View in PubMed
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HIV-1 Epidemiology, Genetic Diversity, and Primary Drug Resistance in the Tyumen Oblast, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279938
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2016;2016:2496280
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Natalya M Gashnikova
Ekaterina M Astakhova
Mariya P Gashnikova
Evgeniy F Bocharov
Svetlana V Petrova
Olga A Pun'ko
Alexander V Popkov
Aleksey V Totmenin
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2016;2016:2496280
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Retroviral Agents - administration & dosage
Drug Resistance, Viral - drug effects - genetics
Female
HIV Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - genetics
HIV-1 - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Phylogeny
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
Introduction. Specific molecular epidemic features of HIV infection in Tyumen Oblast (TO), Russia, were studied. Methods. The genome sequences encoding HIV-1 protease-reverse transcriptase, integrase, and major envelope protein were examined for 72 HIV-1 specimens isolated from the TO resident infected in 2000-2015. Results. The recorded prevalence of HIV-1 subtype A (A1) is 93.1%; HIV-1 subtype B continues to circulate in MSM risk group (1.4%). Solitary instances of HIV-1 recombinant forms, CRF63_02A1 (1.4%) and CRF03_AB (1.4%), were detected as well as two cases of HIV-1 URF63_A1 (2.8%). Phylogenetic analysis showed no HIV-1 clustering according to the duration of infection and risk groups but revealed different epidemic networks confirming that HIV infection spread within local epidemic foci. A high incidence of CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 variants and a higher rate of secondary mutations influencing the virus fitness (K20R, L10V, and I) are observed among the virus specimens isolated from newly infected individuals. Conclusions. The current HIV-1 epidemic in TO develops within the local epidemic networks. Similar to the previous period, HIV-1 subtype A is predominant in TO with sporadic cases of importation of HIV-1 recombinant forms circulating in adjacent areas.
PubMed ID
27957489 View in PubMed
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Linking Infectious and Narcology Care (LINC) in Russia: design, intervention and implementation protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276935
Source
Addict Sci Clin Pract. 2016 May 04;11(1):10
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-04-2016
Author
Natalia Gnatienko
Steve C Han
Evgeny Krupitsky
Elena Blokhina
Carly Bridden
Christine E Chaisson
Debbie M Cheng
Alexander Y Walley
Anita Raj
Jeffrey H Samet
Source
Addict Sci Clin Pract. 2016 May 04;11(1):10
Date
May-04-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Retroviral Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Case Management - organization & administration
Female
HIV Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Research Design
Russia - epidemiology
Safe Sex
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
Russia and Eastern Europe have one of the fastest growing HIV epidemics in the world. While countries in this region have implemented HIV testing within addiction treatment systems, linkage to HIV care from these settings is not yet standard practice. The Linking Infectious and Narcology Care (LINC) intervention utilized peer-led strengths-based case management to motivate HIV-infected patients in addiction treatment to obtain HIV care. This paper describes the protocol of a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of the LINC intervention in St. Petersburg, Russia.
Participants (n = 349) were recruited from the inpatient wards at the City Addiction Hospital in St. Petersburg, Russia. After completing a baseline assessment, participants were randomly assigned to receive either the LINC intervention or standard of care. Participants returned for research assessments 6 and 12 months post-baseline. Primary outcomes were assessed via chart review at HIV treatment locations.
LINC holds the potential to offer an effective approach to coordinating HIV care for people who inject drugs in Russia. The LINC intervention utilizes existing systems of care in Russia, minimizing adoption of substantial infrastructure for implementation. Trial Registration NCT01612455.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27141834 View in PubMed
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Lopinavir/ritonavir, atazanavir/ritonavir, and efavirenz in antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected individuals over 144 weeks: an open-label randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117488
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2013 Jul;45(7):543-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Lars-Magnus Andersson
Jan Vesterbacka
Anders Blaxhult
Leo Flamholc
Staffan Nilsson
Vidar Ormaasen
Anders Sönnerborg
Magnus Gisslén
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. lars-magnus.andersson@infect.gu.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2013 Jul;45(7):543-51
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Retroviral Agents - administration & dosage
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active - methods
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Female
HIV Infections - drug therapy - virology
HIV-1 - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Prospective Studies
RNA, Viral - blood
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Viral Load
Abstract
The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of ritonavir boosted atazanavir versus ritonavir boosted lopinavir or efavirenz, all in combination with 2 nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), over 144 weeks in antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected individuals.
A prospective open-label randomized controlled trial was conducted at 29 sites in Sweden and Norway between April 2004 and December 2009. Patients were randomized to receive either efavirenz 600 mg once daily (EFV), or atazanavir 300 mg and ritonavir 100 mg once daily (AZV/r), or lopinavir 400 mg and ritonavir 100 mg twice daily (LPV/r). The primary endpoints were the proportion of patients with HIV-1 RNA 100,000 copies/ml at baseline had similar response rates in all arms.
EFV was superior to LPV/r at week 48, but there were no significant differences between the 3 arms in the long-term (144 weeks) follow-up.
PubMed ID
23294034 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.