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2006 Canadian clinical practice guidelines on the management and prevention of obesity in adults and children [summary].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164223
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Apr 10;176(8):S1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2007
Author
David C W Lau
James D Douketis
Katherine M Morrison
Irene M Hramiak
Arya M Sharma
Ehud Ur
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Julia McFarlane Diabetes Research Centre, Diabetes and Endocrine Research Group, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta. dcwlau@ucalgary.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Apr 10;176(8):S1-13
Date
Apr-10-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Bariatric Surgery
Behavior Therapy
Body mass index
Bulimia Nervosa - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Depressive Disorder - psychology
Diet
Disease Management
Evidence-Based Medicine
Exercise
Health Behavior
Health education
Humans
Life Style
Obesity - classification - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Patient care team
Research - trends
Waist-Hip Ratio
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2007 Nov 20;177(11):139118025434
PubMed ID
17420481 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute effect of alginate-based preload on satiety feelings, energy intake, and gastric emptying rate in healthy subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132787
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Sep;20(9):1851-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Morten Georg Jensen
Mette Kristensen
Anita Belza
Jes C Knudsen
Arne Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. mmgj@life.ku.dk
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Sep;20(9):1851-8
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alginates - therapeutic use
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Body mass index
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Energy Intake - drug effects - physiology
Female
Gastric Emptying - drug effects - physiology
Glucuronic Acid - therapeutic use
Heart Rate - drug effects
Hexuronic Acids - therapeutic use
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Postprandial Period
Reference Values
Satiation - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
Viscous dietary fibers such as sodium alginate extracted from brown seaweed have received much attention lately for their potential role in energy regulation through the inhibition of energy intake and increase of satiety feelings. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect on postprandial satiety feelings, energy intake, and gastric emptying rate (GER), by the paracetamol method, of two different volumes of an alginate-based preload in normal-weight subjects. In a four-way placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial, 20 subjects (age: 25.9 ± 3.4 years; BMI: 23.5 ± 1.7 kg/m(2)) were randomly assigned to receive a 3% preload concentration of either low volume (LV; 9.9 g alginate in 330 ml) or high volume (HV; 15.0 g alginate in 500 ml) alginate-based beverage, or an iso-volume placebo beverage. The preloads were ingested 30 min before a fixed breakfast and again before an ad libitum lunch. Consumption of LV-alginate preload induced a significantly lower (8.0%) energy intake than the placebo beverage (P = 0.040) at the following lunch meal, without differences in satiety feelings or paracetamol concentrations. The HV alginate significantly increased satiety feelings (P = 0.038), reduced hunger (P = 0.042) and the feeling of prospective food consumption (P = 0.027), and reduced area under the curve (iAUC) paracetamol concentrations compared to the placebo (P = 0.05). However, only a 5.5% reduction in energy intake was observed for HV alginate (P = 0.20). Although they are somewhat contradictory, our results suggest that alginate consumption does affect satiety feelings and energy intake. However, further investigation on the volume of alginate administered is needed before inferring that this fiber has a possible role in short-term energy regulation.
PubMed ID
21779093 View in PubMed
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An observational study of slimming behavior in Denmark in 1992 and 1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49794
Source
Obes Res. 2002 Sep;10(9):911-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Hanne Bendixen
Jesper Madsen
Dorthe Bay-Hansen
Ulrik Boesen
Lars F Ovesen
Else Marie Bartels
Arne Astrup
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, the Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark. hb@kvl.dk
Source
Obes Res. 2002 Sep;10(9):911-22
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet, Reducing
Exercise
Female
Food, Formulated
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - therapy
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sex Characteristics
Weight Loss
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To elucidate how frequent weight-loss attempts are made, the methods used to achieve weight loss, and the extent to which the outcome is positive. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Two independent interviews were conducted in 1992 and in 1998, each with 1200 randomly selected adult subjects. Each survey was designed to ensure an equal distribution of age, gender, and geographical regions in Denmark. RESULTS: The proportion of subjects having attempted weight loss did not change from 1992 to 1998, although the prevalence of overweight and obesity increased from 1992 (overweight, 30%; obesity, 6%) to 1998 (overweight, 35%; obesity, 8%). Almost twice as many women (61%) than men (32%) had attempted weight loss (p 50 years (39%) (p 50 years. Changes in habitual diet and increased physical activity are the most prevalent modes of slimming, whereas the use of over-the-counter diet pills or meal replacements has decreased from 1992 to 1998. This development may have a positive impact on future body- weight-management strategies.
PubMed ID
12226140 View in PubMed
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The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid metabolic disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127354
Source
Ann Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;24(1):69-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Roger S McIntyre
Mohammad Alsuwaidan
Benjamin I Goldstein
Valerie H Taylor
Ayal Schaffer
Serge Beaulieu
David E Kemp
Author Affiliation
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Departments of Psychiatry and Pharmacology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. roger.mcintyre@uhn.on.ca
Source
Ann Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;24(1):69-81
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Bariatric Surgery - psychology
Binge-Eating Disorder - epidemiology - therapy
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - therapy
Canada
Central Nervous System Stimulants - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - therapy
Dyslipidemias - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - therapy
Metabolic Diseases - epidemiology - therapy
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - therapy
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Obesity - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
One goal of the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) is to develop evidence-based and best practice educational programs and recommendations. Our group conducted a comprehensive literature review to provide evidence-based recommendations for treating metabolic comorbidity in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD).
We searched PubMed for all English-language articles published January 1966 to November 2010 using BD and MDD cross-referenced with metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. That search was augmented by a review of articles reporting outcomes of an intervention targeting components of metabolic syndrome in individuals with MDD or BD.
Consensus exists for the recommendation that individuals with MDD and BD should be routinely screened for risk factors that increase risk for metabolic syndrome. For excess weight, the best-studied pharmacologic approaches are metformin and topiramate, with emerging evidence for liraglutide and modafinil. For binge eating disorder, the best evidence in mood disorders was for cognitive-behavioral therapy as well as topiramate, zonisamide, and in select cases selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. For dysglycemia, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, evidence supports cognitive-behavioral interventions and anti-diabetic, antilipidemic, and antihypertensive treatments.
Comprehensive care of individuals with mood disorders should include routine evaluation of the risk and presence of metabolic syndrome and its components. Systematic evaluation of preventative and targeted treatments of metabolic syndrome in mood disorder populations is insufficient.
PubMed ID
22303523 View in PubMed
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Changes in glucose metabolism in people with different glucose metabolism disorders at baseline: follow-up results of a Finnish national diabetes prevention programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277251
Source
Diabet Med. 2015 Dec;32(12):1611-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
N. Rautio
J. Jokelainen
H. Oksa
T. Saaristo
M. Peltonen
H. Puolijoki
J. Tuomilehto
M. Vanhala
L. Moilanen
M. Uusitupa
S. Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Source
Diabet Med. 2015 Dec;32(12):1611-6
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Body mass index
Combined Modality Therapy
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Diet, Diabetic
Diet, Reducing
Disease Progression
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Intolerance - complications - diet therapy - physiopathology - therapy
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Nutrition Policy
Overweight - complications - diet therapy - drug therapy - therapy
Patient compliance
Prediabetic State - complications - diet therapy - physiopathology - therapy
Primary Health Care
Risk
Weight Loss
Abstract
To examine changes in glucose metabolism (fasting and 2-h glucose) during follow-up in people with impaired fasting glucose in comparison with changes in people with isolated impaired glucose tolerance, people with impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance combined and people with screening-detected Type 2 diabetes at baseline, among those who participated in a diabetes prevention programme conducted in Finland.
A total of 10 149 people at high risk of Type 2 diabetes took part in baseline examination. Of 5351 individuals with follow-up = 9 months, 1727 had impaired glucose metabolism at baseline and completed at least one lifestyle intervention visit. Most of them (94.6%) were overweight/ obese.
Fasting glucose decreased during follow-up among overweight/obese people in the combined impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance group (P = 0.044), as did 2-h glucose in people in the isolated impaired glucose tolerance group (P = 0.0014) after adjustment for age, sex, medication and weight at baseline, follow-up time and changes in weight, physical activity and diet. When comparing changes in glucose metabolism among people with different degrees of glucose metabolism impairment, fasting glucose concentration was found to have increased in those with isolated impaired glucose tolerance (0.12 mmol/l, 95% Cl 0.05 to 0.19) and it decreased to a greater extent in those with screening-detected Type 2 diabetes (-0.54 mmol/l, 95% Cl -0.69 to -0.39) compared with those with impaired fasting glucose (-0.21 mmol/l, 95% Cl -0.27 to -0.15). Furthermore, 2-h glucose concentration decreased in the isolated impaired glucose tolerance group (-0.82 mmol/l, 95% Cl -1.04 to -0.60), in the combined impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance group (-0.82 mmol/l, 95% Cl -1.07 to -0.58) and in the screening-detected Type 2 diabetes group (-1.52, 95% Cl -1.96 to -1.08) compared with those in the impaired fasting glucose group (0.26 mmol/l, 95% Cl 0.10 to 0.43). Results were statistically significant even after adjustment for covariates (P
PubMed ID
25864699 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Jun;54(6):850-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Diane L Kelsall
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Jun;54(6):850-1
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Editorial Policies
Family Practice
Humans
Obesity - drug therapy
Peer Review, Research
Periodicals as Topic
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2008 Apr;54(4):498-9, 500-118411368
Comment On: Can Fam Physician. 2008 Jun;54(6):848-9; author reply 849-5018556487
PubMed ID
18556489 View in PubMed
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The effect of orlistat on body weight and coronary heart disease risk profile in obese patients: the Swedish Multimorbidity Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47820
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Sep;248(3):245-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
F. Lindgärde
Author Affiliation
Department of Vascular Disease, Malmö University Hospital, University of Lund, 20502 Malmö, Sweden. folke.lindgarde@medsforsk.mas.lu.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Sep;248(3):245-54
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Chi-Square Distribution
Diet, Reducing
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Lactones - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - diet therapy - drug therapy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of orlistat on body weight and cardiovascular risk amongst obese patients at high coronary risk. DESIGN: After screening, patients entered a two-week single-blind placebo lead-in period, during which they followed a mildly hypocaloric diet, before being randomized to double-blind treatment with either orlistat 120 mg or placebo three times daily, in conjunction with dietary intervention for 1 years. SETTING: The study was conducted at 33 primary care centres in Sweden. SUBJECTS: A total of 382 obese adults (body mass index 28-38 kg m-2) with type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia and/or hypertension were recruited, of whom 376 were randomized to orlistat (n = 190) or placebo (n = 186). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Change in body weight, waist and hip circumferences, blood pressure, serum lipid profile, fasting glucose and HbA1c. RESULTS: After 1 years, mean weight loss was significantly greater with orlistat compared with placebo (5.9% vs. 4.6%; P or = 5% (54.2% vs. 40.9%; P
Notes
Comment In: ACP J Club. 2001 Mar-Apr;134(2):61
PubMed ID
10971792 View in PubMed
Less detail

Fat intake and food choices during weight reduction with diet, behavioural modification and a lipase inhibitor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61800
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 May;247(5):607-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
K. Franson
S. Rössner
Author Affiliation
Swedish Association for People with Bowel and Stomach Diseases, Box 20054, S-104 60 Stockholm, Sweden. stephan.rossner@medhs.ki.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 May;247(5):607-14
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Behavior Therapy
Diet Records
Diet, Reducing
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Double-Blind Method
Energy intake
Female
Food Preferences
Humans
Lactones - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - prevention & control
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study the composition of fat intake and fat-rich meals consumed during a trial in which obese subjects were treated with a lipase-inhibitor or placebo, with emphasis on food choices and eating hours. DESIGN: Patients were instructed to record all food and drink taken for four days prior to each dietician visit. The food diaries from all scheduled 15 treatment visits were analysed for nutritional content and composition and for temporal distribution. All meals containing 25 g of fat were defined as fat-rich. SUBJECTS: Twenty-eight women and six men, mean age 45.2 +/- 10.9 (SD) years with a mean body mass index of 37.3 +/- 3.3 (SD) kg m-2 at the beginning of the study. RESULTS: Fat intake, both as absolute weight and as energy % was generally higher in the placebo group but no significant trend over time could be seen. Fat rich meals were increased by 59% towards the end of the study. Most fat rich meals were eaten at lunch and dinner. Cooking fat, fatty sauces, meat dishes and cheese contributed to the major proportion of fat, both for placebo and drug treated subjects. No major changes were seen in food choice over time. CONCLUSION: A lipase inhibitor may affect the amount of fat ingested but does not seem to change major sources of fat. The typical fat-rich meal consumed by these subjects was a meat dish, consumed in the evening.
PubMed ID
10810001 View in PubMed
Less detail

Incorrect use and limited weight reduction of orlistat (Xenical) in clinical practice. A cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193317
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Jul;57(4):309-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
B. Beermann
H. Melander
J. Säwe
C. Ulleryd
R. Dahlqvist
Author Affiliation
Medical Products Agency, Uppsala, Sweden. bjorn.beermann@mpa.se
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Jul;57(4):309-11
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Drug Prescriptions - standards
Female
Humans
Lactones - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden
Treatment Refusal
Weight Loss
Abstract
To study the prescribing of the antiobesity drug orlistat in relation to the approved indication and its weight-reducing effect in clinical practice during the first 3 months of treatment.
Anonymous postal questionnaire survey to prescribers of orlistat concerning a random sample of 1000 of 20,000 prescriptions.
Useful information was obtained for 789 patients.
Primary and secondary care in Sweden.
Beginning and continued treatment according to the approved indication. Dropout from treatment. Weight loss during treatment.
Four percent of the patients were prescribed orlistat despite having a body mass index (BMI) less than 28 kg/m2. Only 24% of the patients had a diet period with a weight loss of 2.5 kg or greater before the start of therapy. Half of the patients with a weight loss of less than 5% after 3 months continued the treatment. Ten percent gained weight or had no weight loss at all while 43% lost less than 5% in weight. At least one-quarter of the patients stopped the treatment within the observation period.
Orlistat was not prescribed according to the approved indication in the majority of cases. The dropout rate was high and most patients had minor gain from the treatment.
PubMed ID
11549209 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.