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A 10-year follow up of reproductive function in women treated for childhood cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113054
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2013 Aug;27(2):192-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
S N Nielsen
A N Andersen
K T Schmidt
C. Rechnitzer
K. Schmiegelow
J G Bentzen
E C Larsen
Author Affiliation
The Fertility Clinic, The Juliane Marie Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2013 Aug;27(2):192-200
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - blood - chemically induced - etiology - pathology
Adult
Anti-Mullerian Hormone - blood
Antineoplastic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infertility, Female - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Live Birth
Menstruation Disturbances - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Neoplasms - complications - drug therapy - radiotherapy
Ovary - drug effects - pathology - radiation effects
Pregnancy
Primary Ovarian Insufficiency - chemically induced - complications - etiology - pathology
Remission Induction
Risk
Survivors
Young Adult
Abstract
Previously, this study group found that female childhood cancer survivors could be at risk of early cessation of fertility. The aim of the present study was to evaluate reproductive function in the same group of survivors 10 years after the initial study. Of the original cohort of 100, 71 were re-examined. Thirty-six survivors reported regular menstrual cycles. When they were compared with 210 controls, they differed significantly in antral follicle count (AFC) (median 15 versus 18, P=0.047) but not in anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) (median 13.0 versus 17.8 pmol/l). Survivors cured with minimal gonadotoxic treatment had significantly higher AMH and AFC compared with survivors cured with either potentially gonadotoxic treatment or treatment including alkylating chemotherapy and ovarian irradiation (20.0, 5.8 and
PubMed ID
23768622 View in PubMed
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Androgens and antimüllerian hormone in mothers with polycystic ovary syndrome and their newborns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128952
Source
Fertil Steril. 2012 Feb;97(2):509-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Eszter Vanky
Sven Magnus Carlsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. eszter.vanky@ntnu.no
Source
Fertil Steril. 2012 Feb;97(2):509-15
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Androgens - blood
Anti-Mullerian Hormone - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Birth weight
Chi-Square Distribution
Double-Blind Method
Female
Fetal Blood - metabolism
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Linear Models
Male
Metformin - therapeutic use
Norway
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - blood - drug therapy
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To explore the possible effect of metformin on maternal and fetal androgens and antim?llerian hormone (AMH) levels at birth and to study the predictors of maternal and fetal AMH levels.
Substudy of a randomized controlled trial (the PregMet study).
University hospital.
Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and their newborns (n = 132).
Metformin, 2,000 mg/daily, or placebo from the first trimester until delivery.
Androgens and AMH levels in maternal venous serum and in umbilical vein and artery serum.
Except for the increased free testosterone index (FTI) in the umbilical artery in boys, metformin did not influence maternal or fetal androgens, or AMH levels. The maternal body mass index (BMI) was a negative and FTI a strong positive predictor of maternal AMH levels. Maternal androgens and AMH levels did not correlate to fetal gender. In girls, gestational age, birth weight, or maternal androgens did not correlate to the AMH levels. In boys, birth weight was negatively correlated to the AMH levels.
Except for FTI, which was higher in boys, metformin had no impact on maternal or fetal androgen levels or the level of AMH. Fetal AMH, as a surrogate marker for ovarian development, was unaffected by maternal androgens. Birth weight and gestational age had no impact on AMH levels in girls; in boys, AMH probably reflects the physiologic variations due to birth weight.
NCT00159536 (www.clinicaltrials.gov).
PubMed ID
22154766 View in PubMed
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Anti-Müllerian hormone: correlation with testosterone and oligo- or amenorrhoea in female adolescence in a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263591
Source
Hum Reprod. 2014 Oct 10;29(10):2317-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-2014
Author
P. Pinola
L C Morin-Papunen
A. Bloigu
K. Puukka
A. Ruokonen
M-R Järvelin
S. Franks
J S Tapanainen
H. Lashen
Source
Hum Reprod. 2014 Oct 10;29(10):2317-25
Date
Oct-10-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development
Adult
Amenorrhea - blood
Anti-Mullerian Hormone - blood
Biological Markers - blood - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - diagnosis - metabolism
Prospective Studies
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
Can serum anti-M?llerian hormone (AMH) levels measured in female adolescents predict polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-associated features in adolescence and early adulthood?
AMH levels associated well with PCOS-associated features (such as testosterone levels and oligoamenorrhoea) in adolescence, but was not an ideal marker to predict PCOS-associated features in early adulthood.
Several studies have reported that there is a strong correlation between antral follicle count and serum AMH levels and that women with PCOS/PCO have significantly higher serum AMH levels than women with normal ovaries. Other studies have reported an association between AMH serum levels and hyperandrogenism in adolescence, but none has prospectively assessed AMH as a risk predictor for developing features of PCOS during adulthood.
A subset of 400 girls was selected from the prospective population-based Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (n = 4567 at age 16 and n = 4503 at age 26). The population has been followed from 1986 to the present.
At age 16, 400 girls (100 from each testosterone quartile: 50 with oligo- or amenorrhoea and 50 with a normal menstrual cycle) were selected at random from the cohort for AMH measurement. Metabolic parameters were also assessed at age 16 in all participants. Postal questionnaires enquired about oligo- or amenorrhoea, hirsutism, contraceptive use and reproductive health at ages 16 and 26.
There was a significant correlation between AMH and testosterone at age 16 (r = 0.36, P
Notes
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PubMed ID
25056088 View in PubMed
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Anti-Müllerian hormone in pregnant women in relation to other hormones, fetal sex and in circulation of second trimester fetuses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150115
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2009 May;18(5):694-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Melissa Lutterodt
Anne Grete Byskov
Sven Oluf Skouby
Ann Tabor
Claus Yding Andersen
Author Affiliation
The Juliane Marie Centre for Women, Children and Reproduction, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2009 May;18(5):694-9
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Anti-Mullerian Hormone - blood
Denmark
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimesters - blood
Sex Determination Analysis
Sex Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the regulation of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) blood concentrations in mother and fetus during pregnancy. Serum concentrations of AMH, gonadotrophins, oestradiol and progesterone were measured in pregnant women in the first trimester and AMH concentrations in second-trimester fetuses, and these were compared in relation to the sex of the fetus. A total of 153 women undergoing elective termination of a first-trimester pregnancy and seven second-trimester pregnant women undergoing cordocentesis were included. Concentrations of AMH in the serum of first-trimester pregnant women were similar to non-pregnant women and were unrelated to the very high concentrations of human chorionic gonadotrophin and the undetectable concentrations of FSH and LH. Serum concentrations of oestradiol and progesterone were unrelated to the concentrations of AMH and the sex of the fetus. Serum concentrations of AMH of four, second trimester, male fetuses ranged from 64 to 92 ng/ml, whereas it was undetectable in female fetuses. It appears that AMH serum concentrations in first-trimester pregnant women seem to be independent of gonadotrophin concentrations and fetal sex. The concentration of AMH in the circulation of male fetuses is higher than previously reported and is a highly sensitive marker for fetal sex.
PubMed ID
19549450 View in PubMed
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The association between circulating levels of antimüllerian hormone and follicle number, androgens, and menstrual cycle characteristics in young women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127997
Source
Fertil Steril. 2012 Mar;97(3):779-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Susanne Lund Kristensen
Cecilia Høst Ramlau-Hansen
Claus Yding Andersen
Erik Ernst
Sjurdur Frodi Olsen
Jens Peter Bonde
Anne Vested
Gunnar Toft
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. susankst@rm.dk
Source
Fertil Steril. 2012 Mar;97(3):779-85
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anti-Mullerian Hormone - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Contraceptive Agents, Female - therapeutic use
Denmark
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Linear Models
Menstrual Cycle - blood - drug effects
Ovarian Follicle - drug effects - metabolism - ultrasonography
Reproduction
Testosterone - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the association between serum antim?llerian hormone (AMH) and other reproductive parameters in young women.
Cross-sectional study.
University hospital.
Population-based cohort of 256 women: 180 were users and 76 were nonusers of hormonal contraceptives.
None.
Antral follicles, androgens, age at menarche, and duration and regularity of menstrual cycle.
AMH levels were lower among users of hormonal contraceptives compared to nonusers. Among nonusers, women with AMH levels in the upper tertile had 55% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 22%-99%) higher levels of total T and 8% (95% CI = 2%-15%) longer menstrual cycles than women with AMH levels in the lower tertile. An increase of 1 ng/mL in AMH was associated with 45% (95% CI = 6%-97%) higher prevalence of irregular menstrual cycles. These associations were not seen among users of hormonal contraceptives. A strong relationship between AMH and follicle number was found in both users and nonusers.
AMH measurements were found to be applicable in evaluation of the reproductive function of young women. However, there may be differences in the way that serum AMH levels can be interpreted depending on whether the woman uses hormonal contraceptives or not.
PubMed ID
22244782 View in PubMed
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FSHB-211 and FSHR 2039 are associated with serum levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and antimullerian hormone in healthy girls: a longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108734
Source
Fertil Steril. 2013 Oct;100(4):1089-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Hagen CP
Aksglaede L
Sørensen K
Mouritsen A
Mieritz MG
Main KM
Petersen JH
Almstrup K
Rajpert-De Meyts E
Anderson RA
Juul A
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, Faculty of Health and Medical Science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: casperhagen@gmail.com.
Source
Fertil Steril. 2013 Oct;100(4):1089-95
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Anti-Mullerian Hormone - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Child
Denmark
Female
Follicle Stimulating Hormone, Human - blood - genetics
Follicle Stimulating Hormone, beta Subunit - blood - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Immunoassay
Longitudinal Studies
Phenotype
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prospective Studies
Puberty - blood - genetics
Receptors, FSH - genetics
Abstract
To investigate whether genetic polymorphisms in the FSH pathway (FSHB-211 G?T and FSHR 2039 A?G) affect serum levels of FSH, antim�¼llerian hormone (AMH), and age at pubertal onset. FSH secretion and FSH signal transduction are enhanced in carriers of FSHB GG and FSHR AA, respectively. Furthermore, the combined genotype FSHB GG+FSHR AA is the most favorable for male gonadal function, but the effect of this genotype has never been evaluated in peripubertal females. AMH is a marker of ovarian function and is negatively correlated with FSH in prepubertal girls.
Secondary analyses of a prospective cohort study.
General community.
We examined 78 healthy girls twice yearly for 6 years; the median age at baseline was 9.3 years.
None.
Hormone levels were measured by immunoassays, and DNA was isolated from blood and genotyped by restriction fragment length polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction-amplified regions.
Carriers of FSHB GG+FSHR AA had higher FSH before pubertal onset (median 2.2 vs. 1.5 IU/L) and lower AMH (13.8 vs. 19.4 pmol/L) compared with carriers of other genotypes. In crude analysis, girls with FSHB GG+FSHR AA entered puberty earlier, 9.7 vs. 10.6 years. However, the difference was no longer statistically significant after including interval-, right-, and left-censored data in a probit analysis.
The combined effect of FSHB GG+FSHR AA may potentiate the FSH pathway, which increases serum levels of FSH and reduces AMH. Common variations in genes regulating follicle growth may affect AMH levels independently of the number of resting primordial follicles.
PubMed ID
23850305 View in PubMed
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Growth hormone (GH) activity is associated with increased serum oestradiol and reduced anti-Müllerian hormone in healthy male volunteers treated with GH and a GH antagonist.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112919
Source
Andrology. 2013 Jul;1(4):595-601
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
M. Andreassen
J. Frystyk
J. Faber
L Ø Kristensen
A. Juul
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Endocrine Unit, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark. andreassenmikkel@hotmail.com
Source
Andrology. 2013 Jul;1(4):595-601
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Mullerian Hormone - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Down-Regulation
Estradiol - blood
Follicle Stimulating Hormone, Human - blood
Hormone Antagonists - administration & dosage
Human Growth Hormone - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Humans
Inhibins - blood
Injections, Subcutaneous
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Receptors, Somatotropin - antagonists & inhibitors - metabolism
Recombinant Proteins - administration & dosage
Reproduction - drug effects
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Testosterone - blood
Time Factors
Up-Regulation
Abstract
Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptors are present on pituitary gonadotrophs and on testicular Leydig and Sertoli cells. Thus, the GH/IGF-I system may modulate the pituitary-gonadal axis in males. This is a randomized cross-over study. Eight healthy male volunteers (mean age 35, range 29-46 years) were treated with GH for 3 weeks (1st week 0.01, 2nd week 0.02, 3rd week 0.03 mg/day/kg) or a GH receptor antagonist (Pegvisomant) (1st week 10, last 2 weeks 15 mg/day), separated by 8 weeks of washout. Before and after the two treatment periods, concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone, testosterone, oestradiol, sex hormone-binding globulin, inhibin B and Anti-M?llerian Hormone (AMH) were measured. During GH treatment, IGF-I increased [(median (IQR)] 166 (162-235) vs. 702 (572-875) ?g/L, p
PubMed ID
23785020 View in PubMed
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Individual serum levels of anti-Müllerian hormone in healthy girls persist through childhood and adolescence: a longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128244
Source
Hum Reprod. 2012 Mar;27(3):861-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Casper P Hagen
Lise Aksglaede
Kaspar Sørensen
Annette Mouritsen
Anna-Maria Andersson
Jørgen Holm Petersen
Katharina M Main
Anders Juul
Author Affiliation
Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, Section 5064, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark. casper.hagen@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Hum Reprod. 2012 Mar;27(3):861-6
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Mullerian Hormone - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Ovary - physiology
Abstract
In adult women, the circulating level of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is a novel marker of ovarian function, as it reflects the number of remaining ovarian follicles. Therefore, AMH has gained widespread attention in fertility clinics, and a low AMH is believed to predict impaired fertility and imminent menopause. However, the natural course of circulating AMH levels during female childhood and adolescence is not known.
Serum levels of AMH and FSH were measured in girls participating in The COPENHAGEN Puberty Study. Longitudinal part: 85 healthy girls and adolescents were examined, and blood samples were drawn every 6 months for an average of 3 years: median (range) number of samples per girl was 6 (2-10), age at baseline was 9.2 (5.9-12.9) years. Cross-sectional part: 224 prepubertal girls (age 8.3, 5.6-11.7 years) were examined and each girl had one blood sample drawn.
The individual mean AMH levels in girls followed longitudinally ranged from 5 to 54 pmol/l (median 18 pmol/l). The mean intra-individual coefficient of variation of AMH was 22% (range 0-54%). Overall, each girl maintained her AMH level throughout childhood and adolescence although minor, but significant, changes occurred during pubertal transition. In prepubertal girls, AMH was negatively correlated with FSH (r = -0.31, P
PubMed ID
22215627 View in PubMed
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Infertile women below the age of 40 have similar anti-Müllerian hormone levels and antral follicle count compared with women of the same age with no history of infertility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279139
Source
Hum Reprod. 2016 May;31(5):1034-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
H W Hvidman
J G Bentzen
L L Thuesen
M P Lauritsen
J L Forman
A. Loft
A. Pinborg
A. Nyboe Andersen
Source
Hum Reprod. 2016 May;31(5):1034-45
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Anti-Mullerian Hormone - blood
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infertility, Female - epidemiology - metabolism
Ovarian Follicle - diagnostic imaging
Ovarian Reserve
Ovulation Induction
Abstract
Do infertile patients below the age of 40 years have a lower ovarian reserve, estimated by anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and total antral follicle count (AFC), than women of the same age with no history of infertility?
Serum AMH and AFC were not lower in infertile patients aged 20-39 years compared with a control group of the same age with no history of infertility. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY?: The management of patients with a low ovarian reserve and a poor response to controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) remains a challenge in assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Both AMH levels and AFC reflect the ovarian reserve and are valuable predictors of the ovarian response to exogenous gonadotrophins. However, there is a large inter-individual variation in the age-related depletion of the ovarian reserve and a broad variability in the levels of AMH and AFC compatible with conception. Women with an early depletion of the ovarian reserve may experience infertility as a consequence of postponement of childbearing. Thus, low ovarian reserve is considered to be overrepresented among infertile patients.
A prospective cohort study including 382 women with a male partner referred to fertility treatment at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark during 2011-2013 compared with a control group of 350 non-users of hormonal contraception with no history of infertility recruited during 2008-2010.
Included patients and controls were aged 20-39 years. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome were excluded. On Cycle Days 2-5, AFC and ovarian volume were measured by transvaginal sonography, and serum levels of AMH, FSH and LH were assessed.
Infertile patients had similar AMH levels (11%, 95% confidence interval (CI): -1;24%) and AFC (1%, 95% CI: -7;8%) compared with controls with no history of infertility in an age-adjusted linear regression analysis. The prevalence of very low AMH levels (
PubMed ID
26965431 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.