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209 records – page 1 of 21.

A 3-month evaluation of the efficacy of nedocromil sodium in asthma: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of nedocromil sodium conducted by a Canadian multicenter study group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229565
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1990 Mar;85(3):612-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1990
Author
A S Rebuck
S. Kesten
L P Boulet
A. Cartier
D. Cockcroft
J. Gruber
F. Laberge
E. Lee-Chuy
M. Keshmiri
G F MacDonald
Author Affiliation
Edmonton General Hospital, Canada.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1990 Mar;85(3):612-7
Date
Mar-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - physiopathology
Canada
Chronic Disease
Double-Blind Method
Drug Therapy, Combination
Drug Tolerance
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Nedocromil
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate - drug effects - physiology
Quinolones - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Time Factors
Abstract
Nedocromil sodium is a pyranoquinoline dicarboxylic acid derivative, formulated in a metered-dose inhaler. Because nedocromil sodium has in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory properties, it was evaluated in a group of steroid-dependent patients with asthma to observe how well it might be tolerated and for evidence of any beneficial effects. In a double-blind, group-comparative study, 127 patients received nedocromil sodium and 61 received placebo, administered as two puffs of 2 mg, four times per day, for 12 weeks. Ten patients developed adverse reactions, seven receiving active drug and three patients receiving placebo. Two patients of each group withdrew because of worsening asthma. Despite selecting patients whose asthma was stable, when they were receiving established therapeutic regimens that included steroids and bronchodilators, it was found that diary-card symptom scores, morning and evening peak expiratory flow rate values, and inhaled beta-agonist usage all demonstrated slight but significant benefit with addition of nedocromil sodium. It is concluded that the inhaled, anti-inflammatory agent, nedocromil sodium, may be added to asthma-treatment regimens with the reasonable expectation of further modest symptomatic benefit.
PubMed ID
2155958 View in PubMed
Less detail

[About the hazards concerning over the counter prescription drugs].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212980
Source
Duodecim. 1996;112(9):775-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996

Acetaminophen, aspirin, and chronic renal failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47628
Source
N Engl J Med. 2001 Dec 20;345(25):1801-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-20-2001
Author
C M Fored
E. Ejerblad
P. Lindblad
J P Fryzek
P W Dickman
L B Signorello
L. Lipworth
C G Elinder
W J Blot
J K McLaughlin
M M Zack
O. Nyrén
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. michael.fored@mep.ki.se
Source
N Engl J Med. 2001 Dec 20;345(25):1801-8
Date
Dec-20-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - adverse effects
Analgesics, Non-Narcotic - adverse effects
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects
Aspirin - adverse effects
Bias (epidemiology)
Case-Control Studies
Diabetes Complications
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Therapy, Combination
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - chemically induced
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Several epidemiologic studies have demonstrated an association between heavy consumption of nonnarcotic analgesics and the occurrence of chronic renal failure, but it is unclear which is the cause and which is the effect METHODS: In a nationwide, population-based, case-control study of early-stage chronic renal failure in Sweden, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 926 patients with newly diagnosed renal failure and 998 control subjects, of whom 918 and 980, respectively, had complete data. We used logistic-regression models to estimate the relative risks of disease-specific types of chronic renal failure associated with the use of various analgesics RESULTS: Aspirin and acetaminophen were used regularly by 37 percent and 25 percent, respectively, of the patients with renal failure and by 19 percent and 12 percent, respectively, of the controls. Regular use of either drug in the absence of the other was associated with an increase by a factor of 2.5 in the risk of chronic renal failure from any cause. The relative risks rose with increasing cumulative lifetime doses, rose more consistently with acetaminophen use than with aspirin use, and were increased for most disease-specific types of chronic renal failure. When we disregarded the recent use of analgesics, which could have occurred in response to antecedents of renal disease, the associations were only slightly attenuated CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with the existence of exacerbating effects of acetaminophen and aspirin on chronic renal failure. However, we cannot rule out the possibility of bias due to the triggering of analgesic consumption by predisposing conditions.
Notes
Comment In: N Engl J Med. 2001 Dec 20;345(25):1844-611752364
Comment In: N Engl J Med. 2002 May 16;346(20):1588-9; author reply 1588-912015402
Comment In: N Engl J Med. 2002 May 16;346(20):1588-9; author reply 1588-912017163
PubMed ID
11752356 View in PubMed
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[A critical evaluation of side effect data on COX-2 inhibitors]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13970
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Feb 20;122(5):476-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-2002
Author
Erik Pomp
Author Affiliation
Regionalt Legemiddelinformasjonssenter Haukeland Sykehus 5021 Bergen. erik.pomp@haukeland.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Feb 20;122(5):476-80
Date
Feb-20-2002
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Comparative Study
Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors - adverse effects
English Abstract
Humans
Lactones - adverse effects
Osteoarthritis - drug therapy
Peptic Ulcer - chemically induced - prevention & control
Pyrazoles
Sulfonamides - adverse effects
Sulfones
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Celecoxib and rofecoxib have been used in Norway since 2000. These cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors (COX-2 inhibitors) have no better clinical efficacy than older non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis, but may possibly lead to a lower incidence of upper gastrointestinal ulcers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Published and unpublished clinical data on side effects were examined and interpreted. The aim was to evaluate the general safety of these new drugs compared with older NSAIDs. RESULTS: The incidence of side effects is addressed in two large published studies comparing COX-2 inhibitors with other NSAIDs. Only rofecoxib showed an unequivocal lower incidence of complicated upper gastrointestinal ulcers. However, the incidence of serious side effects was significantly higher in the rofecoxib group. In the other study there was a trend towards more serious side effects in the celecoxib group. INTERPRETATION: The available clinical data do not suggest that COX-2 inhibitors are safer drugs than other NSAIDs.
PubMed ID
11961974 View in PubMed
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[Acute flank pain syndrome: a common presentation of acute renal failure in young men in Iceland].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135735
Source
Laeknabladid. 2011 Apr;97(4):215-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Helga Margret Skuladottir
Margret Birna Andresdottir
Sverrir Hardarson
Margret Arnadottir
Author Affiliation
Lyflækningadeild, Karolinska háskólasjúkrahúsinu, Stokkhólmi, (áður lyflækningasviði Landspítala).
Source
Laeknabladid. 2011 Apr;97(4):215-21
Date
Apr-2011
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Acute Kidney Injury - epidemiology
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects
Flank Pain - epidemiology
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Syndrome
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to calculate the incidence of the acute flank pain syndrome in Iceland and to describe the case series.
The hospital records of those who fulfilled the following criteria were studied: age 18-41 years, acute renal failure, and a visit to Landspitali University Hospital in 1998-2007. The acute flank pain syndrome was defined as severe flank pain in combination with acute renal failure, unexplained except for the possible consumption of NSAIDs, ethanol or both. Information was collected about the sales of NSAIDs.
One hundred and six patients had acute renal failure. Of those, 21 had the acute flank pain syndrome (20%). The annual incidence of the acute flank pain syndrome increased threefold during the study period. The average incidence was 3.2/100.000/year (relative to the population of the Reykjavik area) and 2.0/100.000/year (relative to the population of Iceland). 18 patients were male and the median age was 26 (19-35) years. The symptoms regressed spontaneously during a few days or weeks. There was history of NSAID intake in 15, ethanol consumption in 15, either in 20, and both in nine patients. The sales figures of NSAIDs were high and they increased during the study period, especially those of the over-the-counter sales of ibuprofen.
The incidence of the acute flank pain syndrome was high. The paper describes the largest case series that has been published since the withdrawal of suprofen in 1987. Young people should be warned about consuming NSAIDs during or directly after binge drinking.
PubMed ID
21451200 View in PubMed
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Adverse drug reactions and debrisoquine/sparteine (P450IID6) polymorphism in patients with fibromyalgia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208558
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 1997 May;16(3):291-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
K J Skeith
M S Hussain
R T Coutts
C. Ramos-Remus
J A Avina-Zubieta
A S Russell
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Clin Rheumatol. 1997 May;16(3):291-5
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analgesics - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Analysis of Variance
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antirheumatic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - enzymology
Back Pain - drug therapy - enzymology
Canada
Cytochrome P-450 CYP2D6 - genetics - metabolism
Debrisoquin - analysis - metabolism
Female
Fibromyalgia - drug therapy - enzymology - genetics
Humans
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prevalence
Abstract
To assess the frequency of adverse drug reaction in patients with fibromyalgia in relation to medications prescribed for this condition. To evaluate the potential role of the P450IID6 phenotype in the pathogenesis of these adverse drug reactions.
Thirty-five patients with fibromyalgia were assessed using a structured questionnaire with demographic and clinical data and perceived adverse drug reactions. A sample of 60 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 62 patients with localized back pain served as controls. The P450IID6 phenotype was determined for each of the fibromyalgia patients.
Overall, 141 patients had used NSAID and 79 (56%) of them reported adverse effects. Antidepressant drugs were used by 68 patients and 35 (51%) patients had adverse effects. Muscle relaxant drugs were used by 48 patients and 15 (31%) of them reported side effects. Analgesics were used by 122 patients and 22 (18%) had experienced adverse effects. Statistical differences in the frequency of adverse effects were found with antidepressant drugs in the fibromyalgia group, compared with rheumatoid arthritis (p=0.01) and back pain (p=0.02). Four of the 35 patients (11.4%) had a metabolic ratio (M.R.) greater than 0.30 (log M.R.= -0.52) indicative of the poor metabolizers (PM) phenotype. M.R. varied from 0.005 (log M.R. = -2.30) to 4.99 (log M.R. = 0.70).
The problem of adverse drug reactions in fibromyalgia patients does not appear to correlate with the PM phenotype of the P450IID6 oxidative enzyme. It also is unlikely that altered xenobiotic detoxification attributable to this PM phenotype would have a significant role in the development of fibromyalgia.
PubMed ID
9184268 View in PubMed
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Agranulocytosis and other blood dyscrasias associated with dipyrone (metamizole).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189288
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2002 Jul;58(4):265-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Karin Hedenmalm
Olav Spigset
Author Affiliation
Drug Epidemiology Unit, Medical Products Agency, Box 26, 751 02 Uppsala, Sweden. karin.hedenmalm@mpa.se
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2002 Jul;58(4):265-74
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Agranulocytosis - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortality
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Dipyrone - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Hematologic Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Agranulocytosis is a potentially lethal adverse drug reaction of dipyrone (metamizole). According to case-control studies, the frequency is low, approximately one per million users. The aim of the study was to describe the pattern of blood dyscrasias associated with dipyrone, identify possible risk factors and calculate the incidence of agranulocytosis associated with dipyrone.
All spontaneous reports of serious blood dyscrasias associated with dipyrone in Sweden were reviewed. The reports were scrutinised for additional information, including bone marrow findings. The reported incidence of agranulocytosis was estimated from total prescription sales of dipyrone.
The reported incidence of agranulocytosis with dipyrone in Sweden was estimated to be at least 1:1439 (95% confidence interval 1:850, 1:4684) prescriptions. Ninety-two percent of the cases of blood dyscrasias occurred during the first 2 months of treatment. Additional risk factors were identified in 36% of the patients. In a total of five cases of which four were fatal, all three haematopoieses were affected according to bone marrow sample findings. Among the fatal cases, a higher proportion had bi- or tricytopenia than among the non-fatal cases ( P
PubMed ID
12136373 View in PubMed
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Ample use of physician-prescribed medications in Finnish elite athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169925
Source
Int J Sports Med. 2006 Nov;27(11):919-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
A. Alaranta
H. Alaranta
M. Heliövaara
M. Airaksinen
I. Helenius
Author Affiliation
Division of Social Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. antti.alaranta@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Sports Med. 2006 Nov;27(11):919-25
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Allergic Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Sex Distribution
Sports
Abstract
The present study aimed at determining the use of physician-prescribed medication in a large number of elite athletes compared with a representative control sample of the general population. Of all the athletes (N = 494) financially supported by the National Olympic Committee, 446 completed a structured questionnaire (response rate 90.3 %) in 2002. A control group (N = 1503, response rate 80.1 %) comprised an age-matched sample from the population-based study collected by the National Public Health Institute. Any prescribed medication was used by 34.5 % of the athletes and 24.9 % of the controls during the past seven days. The most frequently reported physician-prescribed medications among athletes during the previous seven days were anti-allergic medicines (12.6 % of the respondents), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs; 8.1 %), anti-asthmatic medicines (7.0 %), and oral antibiotics (2.7 %). The adjusted odds ratios (95 % CI) for the physician-prescribed medications used during the previous seven days was 2.42 (1.69 - 3.46), 3.63 (2.25 - 5.84), 3.42 (2.05 - 5.70), and 2.15 (1.03 - 4.45) for use of anti-allergic medication, NSAIDs, anti-asthmatic medication, and oral antibiotics, respectively, in the athletes compared with controls. Every fifth athlete reported some NSAID-related adverse effect. In conclusion, the athletes used NSAIDs, antibiotics, anti-asthmatic and anti-allergic medication significantly more often than a representative sample of age-matched controls. All these medicines have potential adverse effects that may have a deleterious impact on the maximum exercise performance of elite athletes. Adverse effects were commonly reported in connection with NSAID use.
PubMed ID
16586342 View in PubMed
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An economic model for determining the costs and consequences of using various treatment alternatives for the management of arthritis in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195175
Source
Pharmacoeconomics. 2001;19 Suppl 1:49-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
R A Zabinski
T A Burke
J. Johnson
F. Lavoie
C. Fitzsimon
R. Tretiak
J V Chancellor
Author Affiliation
Pharmacia Corporation, Global Health Outcomes, Skokie, Illinois, USA.
Source
Pharmacoeconomics. 2001;19 Suppl 1:49-58
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - adverse effects - economics - therapeutic use
Anti-Ulcer Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy - economics
Canada
Cost of Illness
Decision Trees
Drug Therapy, Combination
Duodenal Ulcer - chemically induced - drug therapy - economics
Economics, Pharmaceutical
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Models, Economic
Osteoarthritis - drug therapy - economics
Abstract
To construct a decision analytical model to compare the costs and clinical consequences of treating patients with celecoxib or various nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)/gastrointestinal (GI) co-therapy regimens for the management of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. The model quantified the number of patients expected to experience any GI complication commonly associated with NSAID therapy.
Resource use for the treatment of each GI complication in the model was estimated after consulting Canadian experts. Standard unit costs from Ontario were applied to resources to calculate the cost of each complication.
The model revealed that the NSAID-alone regimen was associated with the lowest cost [$262 Canadian dollars ($Can) per patient per 6 months] followed by the celecoxib regimen ($Can273), diclofenac/misoprostol ($Can365), NSAID + histamine H2 receptor antagonist ($Can413), NSAID + misoprostol ($Can421), and NSAID + proton pump inhibitor ($Can731). A break-even analysis showed that up to 80% of the study cohort could be treated with celecoxib instead of the NSAID-alone regimen without increasing the health system's overall budget. Celecoxib was associated with the fewest GI-related deaths, hospitalised events; symptomatic ulcers, and cases of anaemia. The celecoxib regimen was also associated with the fewest cases of upper GI distress. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the model was most sensitive to the distribution of GI risk in the population and to the ingredient costs of the treatment alternatives.
This model indicates that the use of celecoxib could lead to the avoidance of a significant number of NSAID-attributable GI adverse events, and the incremental cost of using celecoxib for arthritis patients > or = 65 years of age in place of current treatment alternatives would not impose an excessive incremental impact on a Canadian provincial healthcare budget.
PubMed ID
11280105 View in PubMed
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209 records – page 1 of 21.