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[2 strategies in case of meningitis in Sweden]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12246
Source
Nord Med. 1990;105(10):261, 265
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Lindberg
Author Affiliation
Infektionskliniken, Länssjukhuset, Halmstad.
Source
Nord Med. 1990;105(10):261, 265
Date
1990
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Ampicillin - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy
Cephalosporins - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Chloramphenicol - therapeutic use
English Abstract
Humans
Infant
Meningitis - drug therapy - microbiology
Abstract
In contrast to the other Nordic countries Sweden has long had a favourable position as regards meningococcal disease. In the last 10 year period the annual incidence has been only about one case per 100,000 inhabitants. The treatment once the cause is confirmed is conventional and no different from that in the other Nordic countries but varies somewhat in the event of unknown etiology. Cortisone therapy also seems to be more frequent in treatment of meningitis. Two strategies for antibiotic prophylaxis are used in Sweden.
PubMed ID
2235471 View in PubMed
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5-y Follow-up study of patients with neuroborreliosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31443
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(6):421-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Johan Berglund
Louise Stjernberg
Katharina Ornstein
Katarina Tykesson-Joelsson
Hallstein Walter
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. johan.berglund@ltblekinge.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(6):421-5
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Lyme Neuroborreliosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The objective of this follow-up study was to determine the long-term outcome of strictly classified cases of neuroborreliosis treated with antibiotics. A 1-y prospective population-based survey of Lyme borreliosis was conducted in southern Sweden between 1992 and 1993. A total of 349 identified cases with suspected neuroborreliosis were followed up 5 y later. Medical records were reviewed and all participants filled in a questionnaire. Of those patients classified with definite neuroborreliosis, 114/130 completed the follow-up, of whom 111 had completed the initial antibiotic treatment. Of the 114 patients followed up, 86 (75%) had recovered completely and 70 (61%) had recovered within 6 months. Residual neurological symptoms, such as facial palsy, concentration disorder, paresthesia and/or neuropathy, were reported by 28/114 patients. No significant differences between different antibiotic treatments were observed in terms of the occurrence of sequelae. To conclude, we found that 25% (95% confidence interval 17-33%) of the patients suffered from residual neurological symptoms 5 y post-treatment. However, the clinical outcome of treated neuroborreliosis is favorable as only 14/114 (12%) patients had sequelae that influenced their daily activities post-treatment. Early diagnosis and treatment would seem to be of great importance in order to avoid such sequelae.
PubMed ID
12160168 View in PubMed
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A 10-year follow-up study of penicillin-non-susceptible S. pneumoniae during an intervention programme in Malmö, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80473
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2006;38(10):838-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Nilsson Percy
Laurell Martin H
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. percy.nilsson@pediatrik.mas.lu.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2006;38(10):838-44
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Utilization
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Penicillin resistance
Physician's Practice Patterns
Pneumococcal Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Practice Guidelines
Streptococcus pneumoniae - drug effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Changes in the proportion of penicillin-non-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae (PNSP) isolates during an intervention programme were evaluated by phenotypic analysis of all initial isolates with penicillin MIC > or =0.5 microg/ml (n=1248) collected 1995-2004. During the study period, the proportion of such isolates was fairly constant (12-19%), and there was no statistically significant variation in the proportion of total PNSP cases (MIC > or =0.12 microg/ml) or PNSP with MIC > or =0.5 microg/ml, with the exception of an increase in 2004. Analysis restricted to clinical cases revealed no statistically significant changes. 23 different serogroups were found, and serogroup 9 isolates accounted for almost half of the PNSP cases. Only minor changes in phenotypic characteristics occurred in the other serogroups, which indicates that the increase in PNSP in 2004 was not due to import of a new resistant clone. Antibiotic consumption is considered to be an important risk factor for penicillin resistance in S. pneumoniae. After initiation of the intervention programme in Malmö, overall prescribing of antibiotics decreased 28%, and the reduction was even greater among children (52%). In conclusion, the proportion of PNSP isolates in Malmö has remained stable, despite the intervention programme and decreased consumption of antibiotics.
PubMed ID
17008226 View in PubMed
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A 10-year survey of blood culture negative endocarditis in Sweden: aminoglycoside therapy is important for survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93395
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(4):279-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Werner Maria
Andersson Rune
Olaison Lars
Hogevik Harriet
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, South Alvsborg Hospital, Borås, Sweden. maria.werner@vgregion.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(4):279-85
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aminoglycosides - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Blood - microbiology
Culture Media
Echocardiography
Endocarditis, Bacterial - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We estimated the prevalence of blood culture negative endocarditis (CNE) and described and analysed data with special attention to antibiotic treatment from patients with infective endocarditis (IE) reported to the Swedish endocarditis registry during the 10-y period 1995-2004. All 29 departments of infectious diseases in Sweden reported data to the registry. During the 10-y period, 2509 IE episodes (78% Duke definite) were identified in 2410 patients. 304 CNE episodes (25% Duke definite) were found. The proportion of CNE was measured to be 12% of all IE episodes. Fatal outcome occurred in 10.7% of all IE patients and in 5% of the CNE patients. The risk of dying was significantly increased in female (9%) compared to male (2%) CNE patients (OR 5.1). Mortality was significantly decreased in patients treated with an aminoglycoside (3%) versus patients without aminoglycoside therapy (13%), OR 0.2. In conclusion, the prevalence of CNE was 12% in Swedish IE patients in a 10-y survey. The mortality in IE was low (10.7%) and 4.6% for CNE. Women have higher mortality rates than men in CNE. CNE patients who received aminoglycoside therapy survived more frequently than CNE patients without this therapy.
PubMed ID
18365919 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Accuracy of the Computed Tomography Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis: Does the Experience of the Radiologist Matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294920
Source
Scand J Surg. 2018 Mar; 107(1):43-47
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Mar-2018
Author
E Lietzén
P Salminen
I Rinta-Kiikka
H Paajanen
T Rautio
P Nordström
M Aarnio
T Rantanen
J Sand
J-P Mecklin
A Jartti
J Virtanen
P Ohtonen
N Ånäs
J M Grönroos
Author Affiliation
1 Division of Digestive Surgery and Urology, Department of Acute and Digestive Surgery, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
Scand J Surg. 2018 Mar; 107(1):43-47
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Appendectomy - methods
Appendicitis - diagnostic imaging - drug therapy - surgery
Clinical Competence
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Radiologists
Risk assessment
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the accuracy of computed tomography in diagnosing acute appendicitis with a special reference to radiologist experience.
Data were collected prospectively in our randomized controlled trial comparing surgery and antibiotic treatment for uncomplicated acute appendicitis (APPAC trial, NCT01022567). We evaluated 1065 patients who underwent computed tomography for suspected appendicitis. The on-call radiologist preoperatively analyzed these computed tomography images. In this study, the radiologists were divided into experienced (consultants) and inexperienced (residents) ones, and the comparison of interpretations was made between these two radiologist groups.
Out of the 1065 patients, 714 had acute appendicitis and 351 had other or no diagnosis on computed tomography. There were 700 true-positive, 327 true-negative, 14 false-positive, and 24 false-negative cases. The sensitivity and the specificity of computed tomography were 96.7% (95% confidence interval, 95.1-97.8) and 95.9% (95% confidence interval, 93.2-97.5), respectively. The rate of false computed tomography diagnosis was 4.2% for experienced consultant radiologists and 2.2% for inexperienced resident radiologists (p?=?0.071). Thus, the experience of the radiologist had no effect on the accuracy of computed tomography diagnosis.
The accuracy of computed tomography in diagnosing acute appendicitis was high. The experience of the radiologist did not improve the diagnostic accuracy. The results emphasize the role of computed tomography as an accurate modality in daily routine diagnostics for acute appendicitis in all clinical emergency settings.
PubMed ID
28929862 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Laryngol Otol. 1989 Dec;103(12):1158-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989
Author
H. Faye-Lund
Author Affiliation
ENT Department, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Laryngol Otol. 1989 Dec;103(12):1158-60
Date
Dec-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mastoid - surgery
Mastoiditis - drug therapy - epidemiology - surgery
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
The diagnosis 'acute' mastoiditis is not an unambiguous entity. It contains both 'classical' and 'latent' mastoiditis. 'Classical' mastoiditis was often seen before the antibiotic era, had serious complications and was cured by mastoidectomy. After the introduction of antibiotics, the number of cases of 'classical' mastoiditis decreased and was replaced by a more prolonged condition called 'latent' mastoiditis. Lately in Oslo, we have seen an increase in numbers of 'classical' mastoiditis and at the same time a decrease in the incidence of 'latent' mastoiditis. A four year study of patients with 'classical' mastoiditis is described.
PubMed ID
2614236 View in PubMed
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Acute bacterial meningitis in adults. A 12-year review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196174
Source
Medicine (Baltimore). 2000 Nov;79(6):360-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
A S Hussein
S D Shafran
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Medicine (Baltimore). 2000 Nov;79(6):360-8
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Community-Acquired Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Cross Infection - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Immunocompromised Host
Incidence
Male
Meningitis, Bacterial - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Splenectomy - adverse effects
Abstract
One hundred three episodes of acute bacterial meningitis in adults hospitalized in Edmonton's 2 largest hospitals from 1985 to 1996 were reviewed. Cases complicating neurosurgery were excluded. Most cases were community-acquired (87%). Twenty-three cases remained culture-negative, and there was no statistical relation between culture negativity and antibiotic pretreatment. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the predominant pathogen (52.5%), but Listeria monocytogenes was the second most common isolate, accounting for 12.5% of culture-positive cases. Compared to non-listerial meningitis, those with listeriosis were more likely to have negative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Gram stains (p = 0.07), CSF leukocyte counts
PubMed ID
11144034 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute diarrhoea in adults: aetiology, clinical appearance and therapeutic aspects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73988
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1988;20(3):303-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
B. Svanteson
A. Thorén
B. Castor
G. Barkenius
U. Bergdahl
B. Tufvesson
H B Hansson
R. Möllby
I. Juhlin
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Lund, General Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1988;20(3):303-14
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Campylobacter - isolation & purification
Diarrhea - complications - microbiology - therapy
Feces - microbiology
Female
Fever - etiology
Fluid Therapy
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Seasons
Sweden
Time Factors
Travel
Urban health
Vomiting - etiology
Abstract
A prospective study of acute diarrhoea was performed during 15 months 1981/1982 and included 731 patients and 240 controls. 43% had been infected abroad. A cluster of travellers with bacterial pathogens was diagnosed in July-August. The following pathogens were found: Campylobacter (18%), enterotoxigenic E. coli (6%), Salmonella spp. (5%), rotavirus (4%), Yersinia enterocolitica (3%), Giardia lamblia (3%), Shigella spp. (2%), Clostridium difficile (2%), enteroviruses (2%) and Entamoeba histolytica (less than 1%). More than 90% of the bacterial or parasitic enteropathogens were detected in the first stool sample. Only 10% of the patients needed hospital treatment and for 97% oral fluids were sufficient. The median duration of diarrhoea was 9 days. No fatal cases occurred and only 2 cases of chronic bowel disease were detected.
PubMed ID
3406670 View in PubMed
Less detail

332 records – page 1 of 34.