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Management of respiratory tract infections in primary care in Poland--results of the happy audit 2 project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104127
Source
Przegl Epidemiol. 2014;68(1):33-8, 121-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Julia Strumilo
Slawomir Chlabicz
Ingvar Ovhed
Andrzej Zielinski
Barbara Pytel-Krolczuk
Buczkowski Krzysztof
Maciek Godycki-Cwirko
Ewelina Gowin
Zbigniew Gugnowski
Lech Panasiuk
Malgorzata Makowiec-Dyrda
Artur Mierzecki
Janusz Sieberto
Agata Slawin
Elzbieta Tomiak
Source
Przegl Epidemiol. 2014;68(1):33-8, 121-5
Date
2014
Language
English
Polish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Audit - organization & administration
Female
General practitioners
Humans
Infant
Latvia
Lithuania
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Poland
Primary Health Care - methods
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy
Russia
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The Polish results of the international Happy Audit 2 project are reported which objective was to present therapeutic decisions made by general practitioners (especially antibiotics prescribed) and diagnostic methods applied to patients with respiratory tract infections (RTI).
Following each visit of patient with respiratory tract infection, general practitioners participating in the study completed the questionnaire. The questionnaire included patient's data (age, gender), the duration of disease, clinical symptoms, diagnosis, prescribed antibiotics, additional testing as well as the influence of various factors on therapeutic decision.
Having considered the results of HappyAudit in Poland, a total of 5,137 office visits of patients reporting symptoms of RTIs were analyzed. The average duration of symptoms before visiting GP was 4.8 days (compared to average 4.4 in other countries). Worth noting is that additional testing in diagnosis of RTIs was performed less frequently in Poland: rapid streptococcal test was conducted in 0.4% of cases (European average: 4.45%), CRP--in 2.2% of patients (average from other countries: 14.2%) and chest X-ray in 2.3% of cases compared to 14% in other project's participants. In Poland, the most frequently applied antibiotic was amoxicillin, which was used in 28.9% of cases ended with antibiotic prescribing (amoxicillin/pivampicillin were also predominant in other countries, excluding Sweden). In Poland, macrolides (22.4% of all prescriptions for antibiotic) and cephalosporins (12.1%) were frequently used. The results indicate that narrow-spectrum antibiotics are prescribed in Poland less frequently, with the example being penicillin V which was prescribed in 6.7% of patients with RTIs who were given antibiotic.
Comparing the results of Happy Audit 2 in Poland and other project's participants, the major differences consist in rare use of phenoxymethylpenicillin in favour of amoxicillin and macrolides as well as infrequent use of additional testing in diagnosis of RTIs in Poland.
PubMed ID
25004629 View in PubMed
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