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[2 strategies in case of meningitis in Sweden]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12246
Source
Nord Med. 1990;105(10):261, 265
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Lindberg
Author Affiliation
Infektionskliniken, Länssjukhuset, Halmstad.
Source
Nord Med. 1990;105(10):261, 265
Date
1990
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Ampicillin - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy
Cephalosporins - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Chloramphenicol - therapeutic use
English Abstract
Humans
Infant
Meningitis - drug therapy - microbiology
Abstract
In contrast to the other Nordic countries Sweden has long had a favourable position as regards meningococcal disease. In the last 10 year period the annual incidence has been only about one case per 100,000 inhabitants. The treatment once the cause is confirmed is conventional and no different from that in the other Nordic countries but varies somewhat in the event of unknown etiology. Cortisone therapy also seems to be more frequent in treatment of meningitis. Two strategies for antibiotic prophylaxis are used in Sweden.
PubMed ID
2235471 View in PubMed
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5-y Follow-up study of patients with neuroborreliosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31443
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(6):421-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Johan Berglund
Louise Stjernberg
Katharina Ornstein
Katarina Tykesson-Joelsson
Hallstein Walter
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. johan.berglund@ltblekinge.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(6):421-5
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Lyme Neuroborreliosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The objective of this follow-up study was to determine the long-term outcome of strictly classified cases of neuroborreliosis treated with antibiotics. A 1-y prospective population-based survey of Lyme borreliosis was conducted in southern Sweden between 1992 and 1993. A total of 349 identified cases with suspected neuroborreliosis were followed up 5 y later. Medical records were reviewed and all participants filled in a questionnaire. Of those patients classified with definite neuroborreliosis, 114/130 completed the follow-up, of whom 111 had completed the initial antibiotic treatment. Of the 114 patients followed up, 86 (75%) had recovered completely and 70 (61%) had recovered within 6 months. Residual neurological symptoms, such as facial palsy, concentration disorder, paresthesia and/or neuropathy, were reported by 28/114 patients. No significant differences between different antibiotic treatments were observed in terms of the occurrence of sequelae. To conclude, we found that 25% (95% confidence interval 17-33%) of the patients suffered from residual neurological symptoms 5 y post-treatment. However, the clinical outcome of treated neuroborreliosis is favorable as only 14/114 (12%) patients had sequelae that influenced their daily activities post-treatment. Early diagnosis and treatment would seem to be of great importance in order to avoid such sequelae.
PubMed ID
12160168 View in PubMed
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A 10-year follow-up study of penicillin-non-susceptible S. pneumoniae during an intervention programme in Malmö, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80473
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2006;38(10):838-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Nilsson Percy
Laurell Martin H
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. percy.nilsson@pediatrik.mas.lu.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2006;38(10):838-44
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Utilization
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Penicillin resistance
Physician's Practice Patterns
Pneumococcal Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Practice Guidelines
Streptococcus pneumoniae - drug effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Changes in the proportion of penicillin-non-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae (PNSP) isolates during an intervention programme were evaluated by phenotypic analysis of all initial isolates with penicillin MIC > or =0.5 microg/ml (n=1248) collected 1995-2004. During the study period, the proportion of such isolates was fairly constant (12-19%), and there was no statistically significant variation in the proportion of total PNSP cases (MIC > or =0.12 microg/ml) or PNSP with MIC > or =0.5 microg/ml, with the exception of an increase in 2004. Analysis restricted to clinical cases revealed no statistically significant changes. 23 different serogroups were found, and serogroup 9 isolates accounted for almost half of the PNSP cases. Only minor changes in phenotypic characteristics occurred in the other serogroups, which indicates that the increase in PNSP in 2004 was not due to import of a new resistant clone. Antibiotic consumption is considered to be an important risk factor for penicillin resistance in S. pneumoniae. After initiation of the intervention programme in Malmö, overall prescribing of antibiotics decreased 28%, and the reduction was even greater among children (52%). In conclusion, the proportion of PNSP isolates in Malmö has remained stable, despite the intervention programme and decreased consumption of antibiotics.
PubMed ID
17008226 View in PubMed
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A 10-year survey of blood culture negative endocarditis in Sweden: aminoglycoside therapy is important for survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93395
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(4):279-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Werner Maria
Andersson Rune
Olaison Lars
Hogevik Harriet
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, South Alvsborg Hospital, Borås, Sweden. maria.werner@vgregion.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(4):279-85
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aminoglycosides - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Blood - microbiology
Culture Media
Echocardiography
Endocarditis, Bacterial - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We estimated the prevalence of blood culture negative endocarditis (CNE) and described and analysed data with special attention to antibiotic treatment from patients with infective endocarditis (IE) reported to the Swedish endocarditis registry during the 10-y period 1995-2004. All 29 departments of infectious diseases in Sweden reported data to the registry. During the 10-y period, 2509 IE episodes (78% Duke definite) were identified in 2410 patients. 304 CNE episodes (25% Duke definite) were found. The proportion of CNE was measured to be 12% of all IE episodes. Fatal outcome occurred in 10.7% of all IE patients and in 5% of the CNE patients. The risk of dying was significantly increased in female (9%) compared to male (2%) CNE patients (OR 5.1). Mortality was significantly decreased in patients treated with an aminoglycoside (3%) versus patients without aminoglycoside therapy (13%), OR 0.2. In conclusion, the prevalence of CNE was 12% in Swedish IE patients in a 10-y survey. The mortality in IE was low (10.7%) and 4.6% for CNE. Women have higher mortality rates than men in CNE. CNE patients who received aminoglycoside therapy survived more frequently than CNE patients without this therapy.
PubMed ID
18365919 View in PubMed
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A 10-year survey of clinically significant blood culture isolates and antibiotic susceptibilities from adult patients with hematological diseases at a major Swedish hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25350
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1990;22(4):381-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
H. Fredlund
M. Björeman
J. Kjellander
L. Sjöberg
L. Bjorne
A L Ohlin
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Orebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1990;22(4):381-91
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Quinolones
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteria, Aerobic - isolation & purification
Comparative Study
Drug Therapy, Combination - therapeutic use
Female
Hematologic Diseases - complications - drug therapy - microbiology
Humans
Leukemia - complications
Leukemia, Nonlymphocytic, Acute - complications
Lymphoma - complications
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Retrospective Studies
Septicemia - drug therapy - microbiology
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
In patients treated with cytotoxic drugs granulocytopenia and septicemia are commonly seen. In this 10-year survey 324 blood culture isolates from 184 patients with hematological diseases and septicemia were studied. The distribution of microbiological diagnoses in patients with hematological diseases as well as acute leukemia 1980-1986 was significantly different (p less than 0.01) from an unselected blood culture material from the same period. The differences are mainly seen between Enterobacteriaceae other than Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococci. The microbiological spectrum for patients with hematological disease 1987-1989 was also significantly different (p less than 0.05) from the spectrum of the same group of patients 1980-1986 due to higher frequencies of coagulase-negative staphylococci and alpha-streptococci and lower frequency of E. coli in the latter period. 40% of the isolates were gram-positive cocci during the first period and increased to 50% during the second period. The susceptibility testing indicates that trimethoprim/sulfonamide is not as good a choice as ciprofloxacin or norfloxacin for oral antibiotic prophylaxis. For intravenous therapy imipenem/cilastatin or the combinations of an aminoglycoside/piperacillin or aminoglycoside/third generation cephalosporin have advantages over aminoglycoside/trimethoprim/sulfa in combination. However, addition of isoxazolylpenicillin or vancomycin now seems necessary to cover the increasing part of gram-positive bacteria causing septicemia in patients with hematological disease.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Infect Dis. 1991;23(4):5151957139
PubMed ID
2218401 View in PubMed
Less detail

14-Year Survey in a Swedish County Reveals a Pronounced Increase in Bloodstream Infections (BSI). Comorbidity - An Independent Risk Factor for Both BSI and Mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283680
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(11):e0166527
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Martin Holmbom
Christian G Giske
Mats Fredrikson
Åse Östholm Balkhed
Carina Claesson
Lennart E Nilsson
Mikael Hoffmann
Håkan Hanberger
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(11):e0166527
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Candidiasis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Community-Acquired Infections
Comorbidity
Cross Infection - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Fungemia - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
we assessed the incidence, risk factors and outcome of BSI over a 14-year period (2000-2013) in a Swedish county.
retrospective cohort study on culture confirmed BSI among patients in the county of Östergötland, Sweden, with approximately 440,000 inhabitants. A BSI was defined as either community-onset BSI (CO-BSI) or hospital-acquired BSI (HA-BSI).
of a total of 11,480 BSIs, 67% were CO-BSI and 33% HA-BSI. The incidence of BSI increased by 64% from 945 to 1,546 per 100,000 hospital admissions per year during the study period. The most prominent increase, 83% was observed within the CO-BSI cohort whilst HA-BSI increased by 32%. Prescriptions of antibiotics in outpatient care decreased with 24% from 422 to 322 prescriptions dispensed/1,000 inhabitants/year, whereas antibiotics prescribed in hospital increased by 67% (from 424 to 709 DDD per 1,000 days of care). The overall 30-day mortality for HA-BSIs was 17.2%, compared to 10.6% for CO-BSIs, with an average yearly increase per 100,000 hospital admissions of 2 and 5% respectively. The proportion of patients with one or more comorbidities, increased from 20.8 to 55.3%. In multivariate analyses, risk factors for mortality within 30 days were: HA-BSI (2.22); two or more comorbidities (1.89); single comorbidity (1.56); CO-BSI (1.21); male (1.05); and high age (1.04).
this survey revealed an alarming increase in the incidence of BSI over the 14-year study period. Interventions to decrease BSI in general should be considered together with robust antibiotic stewardship programmes to avoid both over- and underuse of antibiotics.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27835663 View in PubMed
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75% success rate after open debridement, exchange of tibial insert, and antibiotics in knee prosthetic joint infections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267766
Source
Acta Orthop. 2015;86(4):457-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Anna Holmberg
Valdís Gudrún Thórhallsdóttir
Otto Robertsson
Annette W-Dahl
Anna Stefánsdóttir
Source
Acta Orthop. 2015;86(4):457-62
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - methods
Debridement - methods
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Knee Prosthesis - microbiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prosthesis-Related Infections - therapy
Registries
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Rifampin - therapeutic use
Staphylococcus aureus - isolation & purification
Sweden
Tibia - surgery
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Wound Healing
Abstract
Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a leading cause of early revision after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Open debridement with exchange of tibial insert allows treatment of infection with retention of fixed components. We investigated the success rate of this procedure in the treatment of knee PJIs in a nationwide material, and determined whether the results were affected by microbiology, antibiotic treatment, or timing of debridement.
145 primary TKAs revised for the first time, due to infection, with debridement and exchange of the tibial insert were identified in the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register (SKAR). Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen (37%) followed by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) (23%). Failure was defined as death before the end of antibiotic treatment, revision of major components due to infection, life-long antibiotic treatment, or chronic infection.
The overall healing rate was 75%. The type of infecting pathogen did not statistically significantly affect outcome. Staphylococcal infections treated without a combination of antibiotics including rifampin had a higher failure rate than those treated with rifampin (RR = 4, 95% CI: 2-10). In the 16 cases with more than 3 weeks of symptoms before treatment, the healing rate was 62%, as compared to 77% in the other cases (p = 0.2). The few patients with a revision model of prosthesis at primary operation had a high failure rate (5 of 8).
Good results can be achieved by open debridement with exchange of tibial insert. It is important to use an antibiotic combination including rifampin in staphylococcal infections.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25753311 View in PubMed
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[A case of trichomonas vulvovaginitis in the newborn]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61257
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1966 Sep-Oct;5:62-3
Publication Type
Article

[Accumulated microbiological data. Surveillance of infection/antibiotic policy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230457
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jul 24;151(30):1934-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-24-1989
Author
J K Møller
P. Bülow
O J Bergmann
J. Ellegaard
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jul 24;151(30):1934-7
Date
Jul-24-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Computers
Denmark
Drug Utilization
Hospital Departments
Humans
Registries
Abstract
Database reviews of the findings in bacteriological specimens from a period of six years from patients in a department of haematology are employed as a model of how cumulative data about the microorganisms isolated may be employed for surveillance of accumulated infections and in the organization of the antibiotic policy of a department. During the period of observation, the standard treatment with antibiotics for febrile episodes in granulocytopenic patients was altered to piperacillin and netilimicin on the basis of the frequent occurrence of Gram-negative rods including Pseudomonas aeruginosa in blood cultures. It is concluded that accumulated microbiological data is of value for a clinical department and that analysis of the data does not constitute an increased work-load provided that the microbiological reports are routinely registered in a database.
PubMed ID
2781653 View in PubMed
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1147 records – page 1 of 115.