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[15-year experience of moxifloxacin in the treatment of patients with bacterial rhinosinusitis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266614
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 2015;80(3):75-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
A Y Ovchinnikov
M A Edzhe
N A Miroshnichenko
E M Hon
S A Korostelev
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 2015;80(3):75-9
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - physiopathology
Fluoroquinolones - pharmacology
Humans
Rhinitis - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - physiopathology
Russia
Sinusitis - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology - physiopathology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The article summarizes 15 years of experience of the use of moxifloxacin (Avelox) in Russia in patients with acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Emphasize its high bactericidal activity against a broad spectrum of microorganisms- from basic agents to the atypical and anaerobic microflora. The results of these studies suggest the continued effectiveness of the dosage of 400 mg a short course (7 days) over 15 years of practical use of the drug, which in its clinical efficacy is superior to amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefuroxime axetil and levofloxacin. The safety profile of moxifloxacin, studied at the population level is not associated with an increased risk of adverse effects in compliance with the dosing regimen, taking into account the indications and contraindications.
PubMed ID
26331163 View in PubMed
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[A comparative analysis of the Salmonella typhi strains isolated from patients and bacterial carriers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70360
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1989 Dec;(12):8-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989
Author
L E Riabchenko
L A Riapis
L M Sladkova
E I Vostrova
Iu V Kravtsov
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1989 Dec;(12):8-11
Date
Dec-1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Bacteriophage Typing
Carrier State - microbiology
Comparative Study
Drug Resistance, Microbial
English Abstract
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Molecular Weight
Plasmids - genetics
Salmonella typhi - classification - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Typhoid Fever - microbiology
Ukraine
Virulence
Abstract
The comparative analysis of 133 S. typhi clinical strains isolated from patients and carriers in Dnepropetrovsk Province in 1978-1987 was carried out. As shown by this analysis, 10 Vi phage types were represented in the set of strains under study, phage types A and F1 being the most numerous ones. Phage type F1 occurred less frequently among the strains isolated from carriers. 31.1% of the strains were found to contain plasmids with different molecular weight ranging from 96 to 0.5 MD. The occurrence of plasmid-containing strains remained at the same level during the whole period under study. Low-molecular plasmids occurred more frequently in the strains isolated from carriers. The minimal suppressive concentrations of a number of antibiotics, such as penicillin, ampicillin, monomycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, rifampicin and streptomycin, were determined. 7% of the strains were resistant to penicillin, 9% to monomycin, 15%--to tetracycline and 2.6% to chloramphenicol. The correlation between penicillin and monomycin resistance of the strains and the presence of the plasmid with a molecular weight of 60 MD in these strains was established. All strains were shown to be highly variable in the degree of their virulence: from 10(2) to 10(8). The strains isolated from patients possessed greater virulence.
PubMed ID
2629429 View in PubMed
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Acquired macrolide resistance genes in pathogenic Neisseria spp. isolated between 1940 and 1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182672
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2003 Dec;47(12):3877-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Sydney Cousin
William L H Whittington
Marilyn C Roberts
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2003 Dec;47(12):3877-80
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Conjugation, Genetic
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Genes, Bacterial - genetics
Genotype
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
In Situ Hybridization
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Methyltransferases - genetics
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - drug effects - genetics
Neisseria meningitidis - drug effects - genetics
Promoter Regions, Genetic - genetics
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Time Factors
Abstract
Seventy-six Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates, isolated between 1940 and 1987, and seven Neisseria meningitidis isolates, isolated between 1963 and 1987, were screened for the presence of acquired mef(A), erm(B), erm(C), and erm(F) genes by using DNA-DNA hybridization, PCR analysis, and sequencing. The mef(A), erm(B), and erm(F) genes were all identified in a 1955 N. gonorrhoeae isolate, while the erm(C) gene was identified in a 1963 N. gonorrhoeae isolate. Similarly, both the mef(A) and erm(F) genes were identified in a 1963 N. meningitidis isolate. All four acquired genes were found in later isolates of both species. The mef(A) gene from a 1975 N. gonorrhoeae isolate was sequenced and had 100% DNA and amino acid identity with the mef(A) gene from a 1990s Streptococcus pneumoniae isolate. Selected early isolates were able to transfer their acquired genes to an Enterococcus faecalis recipient, suggesting that these genes are associated with conjugative transposons. These isolates are the oldest of any species to carry the mef(A) gene and among the oldest to carry these erm genes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
14638497 View in PubMed
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Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus aphrophilus in systemic and nonoral infections in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183693
Source
APMIS. 2003 Jun;111(6):653-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Susanna Paju
Petteri Carlson
Hannele Jousimies-Somer
Sirkka Asikainen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
APMIS. 2003 Jun;111(6):653-7
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actinobacillus Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology
Adult
Aged
Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans - drug effects - isolation & purification
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Female
Finland
Haemophilus - drug effects - isolation & purification
Haemophilus Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - microbiology
Humans
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Abstract
The oral cavity is the ecological niche for Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Haemophilus aphrophilus, but occasionally they cause severe nonoral infections. In this study we present 20 systemic or nonoral infections due to A. actinomycetemcomitans and H. aphrophilus, comprising all isolates of these species forwarded to and stored in Finnish reference laboratories during the years 1988-2000. The time from specimen collection to correct species identification was 9.3 days for A. actinomycetemcomitans and 10.7 days for H. aphrophilus. A. actinomycetemcomitans strains represented serotypes a, b, c, and d. Arbitrarily primed PCR distinguished four A. actinomycetemcomitans and six H. aphrophilus genotypes. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing with benzylpenicillin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, metronidazole, azithromycin, and trovafloxacin showed generally good activities against the present strains, and the susceptibility patterns closely resembled those of oral strains. The prolonged time to recover and identify A. actinomycetemcomitans and H. aphrophilus from systemic and nonoral infections may delay the correct diagnosis of the patient, but the good antimicrobial efficacies of antimicrobial agents against these pathogens give a good prognosis for the patients and advance the treatment of severe infections caused by these fastidious organisms of oral origin.
PubMed ID
12969021 View in PubMed
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Activity of telithromycin and comparators against isolates of Legionella pneumophila collected from patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infections: PROTEKT Years 1-5.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78204
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2007 Jul;13(7):743-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Dunbar L M
Farrell D J
Author Affiliation
LSU Health Science Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. ldunba@lsuhsc.edu
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2007 Jul;13(7):743-6
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Humans
Ketolides - pharmacology
Legionella pneumophila - drug effects - isolation & purification
Legionnaires' Disease - epidemiology - microbiology
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
World Health
Abstract
The in-vitro activity of telithromycin and comparator antibacterial agents was determined against clinical isolates of Legionella pneumophila collected in the PROTEKT surveillance study. In total, 133 isolates were collected between 1999 and 2004 from 13 countries (Australia, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the USA). MICs were determined by broth microdilution. Telithromycin maintained activity between Year 1 (MIC(90) 0.015 mg/L) and Year 5 (MIC(90) 0.03 mg/L), as did the comparator antibacterial agents. Telithromycin appears to be a candidate for coverage of legionellosis in the empirical treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infection.
PubMed ID
17403130 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 2011;56(3-4):35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
K P Gruver
V B Beloborodov
T N Kuz'menko
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 2011;56(3-4):35-40
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetamides - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Carbapenems - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Cephalosporins - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Enterobacteriaceae - drug effects - isolation & purification
Female
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections - blood - complications - microbiology
Gram-Positive Bacteria - drug effects - isolation & purification
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - blood - complications - microbiology
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Oxazolidinones - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Sepsis - drug therapy - etiology
Vancomycin - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
Cases of sepsis with bacteriemia detected in the S. P. Botkin State Clinical Hospital within 2000-2007 were analysed. The sources of the bacteriemia, the etiological pattern of the pathogens and their susceptibility to antibacterials were estimated. The study enrolled 256 patients with sepsis. The antibiotic susceptibility of 227 isolates from the blood samples was tested. More than a half of the infection sources was detected in the organs of the respiratory tract and abdominal cavity. All the grampositive pathogens were susceptible to vancomycin and linesolid. The overwhelming majority of the enterococcal isolates proved to be susceptible to carbapenem and cefepim.
PubMed ID
21913407 View in PubMed
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[Adaptation of Sonne and Flexner dysentery bacteria to antibiotics and some biological properties of adapted subcultures]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13592
Source
Mikrobiol Zh. 1967 May-Jun;29(3):250-5
Publication Type
Article

Adult cystic fibrosis exacerbations and new strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182440
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2004 Apr 1;169(7):811-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2004
Author
Shawn D Aaron
Karam Ramotar
Wendy Ferris
Katherine Vandemheen
Raphael Saginur
Elizabeth Tullis
David Haase
Dan Kottachchi
Melissa St Denis
Francis Chan
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Peditrics Univeristy of Ottawa; Otawa, Ontario, Canada. saaron@ottawahospital.on.ca
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2004 Apr 1;169(7):811-5
Date
Apr-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Cystic Fibrosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Humans
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Molecular Epidemiology
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Prospective Studies
Pseudomonas Infections - microbiology
Pseudomonas aeruginosa - drug effects - genetics
Abstract
We hypothesized that in adults with cystic fibrosis, the acquisition of a new strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa may be associated with a pulmonary exacerbation. Eighty-four patients who were chronically infected with P. aeruginosa were prospectively followed from eight centers over a 26-month period. Patients had sputum cultures performed every 3 months while clinically stable and at the time of an exacerbation. Forty patients (48%) had an exacerbation requiring intravenous antibiotics during the study period, and in 36 of these patients, their P. aeruginosa isolates were genetically typeable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. In 34 of the 36 patients (94%), P. aeruginosa recovered during clinical stability and at exacerbation were of the same genotype. In only two patients (6%; 95% confidence interval, 0-18%) was a new P. aeruginosa clone cultured during an exacerbation that had not been cultured during clinical stability. There were no significant differences in antibiotic susceptibilities, measured as mean minimal inhibitory concentrations, for isolates retrieved during clinically stable periods compared with isolates retrieved during exacerbations. We conclude that for the majority of adult patients with cystic fibrosis a new pulmonary exacerbation is not caused by the acquisition of a new strain of P. aeruginosa.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2004 Apr 1;169(7):781-215044219
PubMed ID
14670805 View in PubMed
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Adverse health events associated with antimicrobial drug resistance in Campylobacter species: a registry-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58186
Source
J Infect Dis. 2005 Apr 1;191(7):1050-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2005
Author
Morten Helms
Jacob Simonsen
Katharina E P Olsen
Kare Mølbak
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Infect Dis. 2005 Apr 1;191(7):1050-5
Date
Apr-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Campylobacter - drug effects - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Campylobacter Infections - complications - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Erythromycin - pharmacology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Quinolones - pharmacology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Risk factors
Virulence
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Resistance to clinically important antimicrobial agents, particularly fluoroquinolones and macrolides, is increasing among Campylobacter isolates, but few studies have explored the human health consequences of such resistance. METHODS: In a registry-based cohort study, we determined the risk of invasive illness and death associated with infection with quinolone- and erythromycin-resistant Campylobacter strains, while adjusting for comorbidity. We linked data from the Danish Surveillance Registry for Enteric Pathogens with data from the Civil Registration System and National Health Registries. RESULTS: Of 3471 patients with Campylobacter infection, 22 (0.63%) had an adverse event, defined as invasive illness or death, within 90 days of the date of receipt of samples. Patients infected with quinolone-resistant Campylobacter strains had a 6-fold increased risk of an adverse event within 30 days of the date of receipt of samples, compared with patients infected with quinolone- and erythromycin-susceptible Campylobacter strains (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 6.17 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.62-23.47]). However, infection with erythromycin-resistant strains was associated with a >5-fold risk of an adverse event within 90 days of the date of receipt of samples (AOR, 5.51 [95% CI, 1.19-25.50]). CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides evidence of the human health consequences of resistance to clinically important agents among Campylobacter infections and the need for increased efforts to mitigate such resistance.
Notes
Comment In: J Infect Dis. 2005 Apr 1;191(7):1029-3115747234
Comment In: J Infect Dis. 2005 Dec 1;192(11):2027-8; author reply 2028-916267777
Erratum In: J Infect Dis. 2005 May 1;191(9):1570
PubMed ID
15747238 View in PubMed
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675 records – page 1 of 68.