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Antibacterial Susceptibilities of Escherichia coli from Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in the Faroe Islands, Associations with Antibacterial Sales, and Comparison with Iceland and Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294350
Source
Microb Drug Resist. 2018 Jan/Feb; 24(1):40-47
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Author
Marita Debess Magnussen
Hannes Gislason
Shahin Gaini
Karl G Kristinsson
Author Affiliation
1 Thetis, Food and Environmental Laboratory, Tórshavn , Faroe Islands .
Source
Microb Drug Resist. 2018 Jan/Feb; 24(1):40-47
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Ampicillin - economics - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Commerce - statistics & numerical data
Community-Acquired Infections
Denmark - epidemiology
Disk Diffusion Antimicrobial Tests
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Escherichia coli - drug effects - growth & development
Escherichia coli Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Sulfamethoxazole - economics - therapeutic use
Trimethoprim - economics - therapeutic use
Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination - economics - therapeutic use
Urinary Tract Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Currently, data on Escherichia coli antibacterial susceptibilities in the Faroe Islands are lacking. The aim was to investigate the antibacterial susceptibilities of E. coli from patients with community-acquired urinary tract infections in the Faroe Islands, correlate with antibacterial sales, and compare with Iceland and Denmark. From 2009 to 2010 and in 2012, 12 general practitioners from the Faroe Islands were recruited to provide urine samples from patients. Antibacterial susceptibilities were determined by disc diffusion testing according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methods and criteria. Logistic regression (quasibinomial) of the antibacterial resistance proportions versus mean sales during the period of 2008-2011 was used to determine association. Nonsusceptibility to at least 1 of the 14 antibacterial drugs investigated was found in 54% of the E. coli isolates and was most common to ampicillin (46%), followed by sulfamethoxazole (39%), trimethoprim (27%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (27%), and
PubMed ID
28537778 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic prescribing for Canadian preschool children: evidence of overprescribing for viral respiratory infections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201248
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 1999 Jul;29(1):155-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
E E Wang
T R Einarson
J D Kellner
J M Conly
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ewang@ca.pmc_vacc.com
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 1999 Jul;29(1):155-60
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Antiviral Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Canada
Child, Preschool
Drug Costs
Drug Prescriptions - economics - standards
Drug Utilization
Humans
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy - virology
Virus Diseases - drug therapy
Abstract
Antibiotic resistance is associated with prior receipt of antibiotics. An analysis of linked computerized databases for physician visits and antibiotic prescriptions was used to examine antibiotic prescribing for different respiratory infections in preschool children in Canada. In 1995, 64% of 61,165 children aged
PubMed ID
10433579 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic use in a Canadian Province, 1995-1998.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198835
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2000 Apr;34(4):459-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
A G Carrie
C J Metge
G G Zhanel
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. umcarri2@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2000 Apr;34(4):459-64
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Drug Prescriptions
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Drug Utilization Review
Humans
Manitoba
Abstract
Antibiotics are among the most commonly used classes of agents in community practice; yet, studies of antibiotic use in this setting are scarce. Data from developed countries suggest increasing use of newer broad-spectrum agents, which has implications for the development of antibiotic resistance as well as cost of therapy. In this study, we quantified changing patterns of antibiotic use in community practice in Manitoba, Canada, from 1995 to 1998.
A descriptive, population-based study of antibiotic use in Manitoba was facilitated by the Drug Programs Information Network (DPIN) of Manitoba Health; a data management system responsible for recording details of prescriptions dispensed for all Manitoba residents. Antibiotic use data, defined as numbers of prescriptions dispensed, were extracted from the DPIN from January 1, 1995, to March 31, 1998. Antibiotic use is reported as prescriptions per 1000 persons per year (Rx/1000/Yr) based on quarterly use.
Penicillins (48.3%), macrolides (16.0%), and sulfonamides (12.5%) accounted for 75% of total antibiotic use; total use decreased 19.1% between 1995 and 1998. Use of the four most commonly prescribed agents decreased over the study period (amoxicillin, -17.4%; erythromycin, -29.0%; trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, -18.7%; penicillins G and V, -19.2%). In contrast, use of newer and/or broad-spectrum agents increased (ciprofloxacin, 21.9%; cefuroxime, 30.7%; and azithromycin/clarithromycin, 29.5%). Use of second-line agents as a percentage of total antibiotic use increased from 14.4% to 19.3% between January 1995 and March 1998 (p
PubMed ID
10772430 View in PubMed
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Audit and feedback to reduce broad-spectrum antibiotic use among intensive care unit patients: a controlled interrupted time series analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126163
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2012 Apr;33(4):354-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Marion Elligsen
Sandra A N Walker
Ruxandra Pinto
Andrew Simor
Samira Mubareka
Anita Rachlis
Vanessa Allen
Nick Daneman
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacy, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2012 Apr;33(4):354-61
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Drug Costs
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Drug Utilization - standards - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization Review - methods
Feedback
Female
Humans
Intensive Care - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Abstract
We aimed to rigorously evaluate the impact of prospective audit and feedback on broad-spectrum antimicrobial use among critical care patients.
Prospective, controlled interrupted time series.
Single tertiary care center with 3 intensive care units.
A formal review of all critical care patients on their third or tenth day of broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy was conducted, and suggestions for antimicrobial optimization were communicated to the critical care team.
The primary outcome was broad-spectrum antibiotic use (days of therapy per 1000 patient-days; secondary outcomes included overall antibiotic use, gram-negative bacterial susceptibility, nosocomial Clostridium difficile infections, length of stay, and mortality.
The mean monthly broad-spectrum antibiotic use decreased from 644 days of therapy per 1,000 patient-days in the preintervention period to 503 days of therapy per 1,000 patient-days in the postintervention period (P
PubMed ID
22418630 View in PubMed
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Can pay-for-performance to primary care providers stimulate appropriate use of antibiotics?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299390
Source
Health Econ. 2018 01; 27(1):e39-e54
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2018
Author
Lina Maria Ellegård
Jens Dietrichson
Anders Anell
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Health Econ. 2018 01; 27(1):e39-e54
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Child
Drug Prescriptions
Female
Humans
Inappropriate Prescribing - prevention & control
Male
Physicians, Primary Care - economics
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Primary Health Care
Reimbursement, Incentive - economics
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy
Sweden
Abstract
Antibiotic resistance is a major threat to public health worldwide. As the healthcare sector's use of antibiotics is an important contributor to the development of resistance, it is crucial that physicians only prescribe antibiotics when needed and that they choose narrow-spectrum antibiotics, which act on fewer bacteria types, when possible. Inappropriate use of antibiotics is nonetheless widespread, not least for respiratory tract infections (RTI), a common reason for antibiotics prescriptions. We examine if pay-for-performance (P4P) presents a way to influence primary care physicians' choice of antibiotics. During 2006-2013, 8 Swedish healthcare authorities adopted P4P to make physicians select narrow-spectrum antibiotics more often in the treatment of children with RTI. Exploiting register data on all purchases of RTI antibiotics in a difference-in-differences analysis, we find that P4P significantly increased the share of narrow-spectrum antibiotics. There are no signs that physicians gamed the system by issuing more prescriptions overall.
PubMed ID
28685902 View in PubMed
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Confidential prescriber feedback and education to improve antibiotic use in primary care: a controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200935
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Aug 24;161(4):388-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-24-1999
Author
J E Hux
M P Melady
D. DeBoer
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ont. jan@ices.on.ca
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Aug 24;161(4):388-92
Date
Aug-24-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Anti-Bacterial Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Clinical Competence
Confidentiality
Drug Costs
Education, Medical, Continuing
Feedback
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Physician's Practice Patterns
Primary Health Care
Program Evaluation
Teaching Materials
Abstract
Antibiotics are a medication class for which inappropriate prescribing is frequently described. We sought to assess the effectiveness of a mailed intervention combining confidential prescribing feedback with targeted educational bulletins in increasing the use of less expensive, first-line antibiotics by practising physicians.
The participants were 251 randomly selected primary care physicians from southern Ontario who consented to participate (135 in the feedback group and 116 in the control group). Prescribing data were obtained from the claims database of the Ontario Drug Benefit program, which covers all Ontarians over age 65 years for drugs selected from a minimally restrictive formulary. Confidentially prepared profiles of antibiotic prescriptions coupled with guidelines-based educational bulletins were mailed to the intervention group every 2 months for 6 months. The control group received no intervention until after completion of the study. The main outcome measures were change from baseline in physician's median antibiotic cost and proportion of episodes of care in which a prespecified first-line antibiotic was used first.
The median prescription cost of about $11 remained constant in the feedback group but rose in the control group (change of $0.05 v. $3.37, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
10478162 View in PubMed
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Cost-analysis of management strategies for children with vesico-ureteric reflux.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33047
Source
Acta Paediatr Suppl. 1999 Nov;88(431):79-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
L. Nicklasson
S. Högård
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr Suppl. 1999 Nov;88(431):79-86
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Biocompatible Materials - economics - therapeutic use
Child
Collagen - economics - therapeutic use
Cost of Illness
Direct Service Costs - statistics & numerical data
Evaluation Studies
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Injections - economics
Length of Stay - economics
Models, Economic
Prosthesis Implantation - economics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Vesico-Ureteral Reflux - drug therapy - economics - surgery
Abstract
This study is an economic evaluation of three treatment strategies for vesico-ureteric reflux in children: neo-implantation; subureteric injection; and antibacterial prophylaxis. Cost-analysis was used to compare the strategies, implying that the differences in benefits between them were not measured. Direct and indirect costs are included, taking the analytical viewpoint of the community. For the surgical strategies, data from four different hospitals in Sweden were used, and for the prophylactic strategy, data was gathered through a survey of 31 hospitals. The treatment strategies were ranked in the following order (bilateral reflux in parentheses): (i) subureteric injection SEK 25,000-28,000 (26,000-36,000); (ii) antibacterial prophylaxis SEK 16,000-36,000; and (iii) neo-implantation SEK 65,000-90,000 (72,000-95,000).
PubMed ID
10588275 View in PubMed
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A cost-effectiveness analysis of identifying Fusobacterium necrophorum in throat swabs followed by antibiotic treatment to reduce the incidence of Lemierre's syndrome and peritonsillar abscesses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121693
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2013 Jan;32(1):71-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
S. Bank
K. Christensen
L H Kristensen
J. Prag
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Viborg Hospital, Heibergs Allé 4, 8800 Viborg, Denmark. stb@mb.au.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2013 Jan;32(1):71-8
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anti-Bacterial Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Bacteriological Techniques - economics - methods
Cost of Illness
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Denmark
Female
Fusobacterium Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy
Fusobacterium necrophorum - isolation & purification
Humans
Incidence
Lemierre Syndrome - economics - prevention & control
Male
Peritonsillar Abscess - economics - prevention & control
Pharynx - microbiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The main purpose of this paper was to estimate the cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) saved by identifying Fusobacterium necrophorum in throat swabs followed by proper antibiotic treatment, to reduce the incidence of Lemierre's syndrome and peritonsillar abscesses (PTA) originating from a pharyngitis. The second purpose was to estimate the population size required to indicate that antibiotic treatment has an effect. Data from publications and our laboratory were collected. Monte Carlo simulation and one-way sensitivity analysis were used to analyse cost-effectiveness. The cost-effectiveness analysis shows that examining throat swabs from 15- to 24-year-olds for F. necrophorum followed by antibiotic treatment will probably be less costly than most other life-saving medical interventions, with a median cost of US$8,795 per QALY saved. To indicate a reduced incidence of Lemierre's syndrome and PTA in Denmark, the intervention probably has to be followed for up to 5 years. Identifying F. necrophorum in throat swabs from 15- to 24-year-olds followed by proper antibiotic treatment only requires a reduction of 20-25 % in the incidence of Lemierre's syndrome and PTA to be cost-effective. This study warrants further examination of the effect of antibiotic treatment on the outcome of F. necrophorum acute and recurrent pharyngitis, as well as the effect on Lemierre's syndrome and PTA.
PubMed ID
22886057 View in PubMed
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The cost effectiveness of Helicobacter pylori eradication versus maintenance and episodic treatment in duodenal ulcer patients in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214115
Source
Pharmacoeconomics. 1995 Nov;8(5):410-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
P. Unge
B. Jönsson
N O Stålhammar
Author Affiliation
Sandviken Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Pharmacoeconomics. 1995 Nov;8(5):410-27
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Anti-Ulcer Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Decision Trees
Duodenal Ulcer - drug therapy - economics - microbiology
Helicobacter Infections - drug therapy - economics - microbiology
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Markov Chains
Omeprazole - economics - therapeutic use
Recurrence
Sweden
Abstract
This study compares the cost effectiveness of Helicobacter pylori eradication and conventional treatment in duodenal ulcer patients treated by a general practitioner. Using a Markov chain approach, Swedish cost data and a study period of 5 years, we conclude that H. pylori eradication with omeprazole and appropriate antibiotics is a cost-effective alternative compared with both maintenance and episodic treatment. Of the patients entering the eradication strategy, most are cured and will have no relapse during a 5-year period. H. pylori eradication results in higher initial costs but, because of a very low risk of recurrence after successful eradication, the expected future costs are reduced. The investment pays off within 1 year when compared with maintenance treatment, and within 3 years when compared with episodic treatment.
PubMed ID
10160075 View in PubMed
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42 records – page 1 of 5.