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151 records – page 1 of 16.

[According to the study antibiotics are not a risk factor for childhood bronchial asthma].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263395
Source
Praxis (Bern 1994). 2015 Mar 11;104(6):307
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-2015

Acetaminophen, some other drugs, some diseases and the risk of transitional cell carcinoma. A population-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15935
Source
Acta Oncol. 1995;34(6):741-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
G. Steineck
B E Wiholm
M. Gerhardsson de Verdier
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1995;34(6):741-8
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - adverse effects
Age Factors
Analgesics - adverse effects
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects
Anti-Infective Agents, Urinary - adverse effects
Aspirin - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Transitional Cell - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Disease
Female
Humans
Male
Nitrofurantoin - adverse effects
Pharmaceutical Preparations - adverse effects
Population Surveillance
Reproducibility of Results
Rheumatic Diseases - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tetracyclines
Urinary Tract Infections - epidemiology
Urologic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the risk of transitional cell carcinoma among subjects with an intake of acetaminophen, aspirin, some other drugs and with some intercurrent diseases. The source person-time ('study base') included subjects living in Stockholm in 1985-1987. The study included 325 subjects with a transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary tract and 393 controls randomly selected from the source person-time. Data were obtained by a postal questionnaire supplemented by a telephone interview. A relative risk (with a 95% confidence interval) of 1.6 (1.1-2.3) was obtained after an intake of acetaminophen, adjusted for age, aspirin, gender and smoking. Conversely, a 30% decrease in risk was obtained after an intake of aspirin. No details in the exposure substantiated the finding for acetaminophen. The inherent validity problems of observational studies, and the weak evidence in this and previous studies of the association between acetaminophen and transitional cell carcinoma, makes available epidemiological evidence insufficient to regulate the use of this commonly ingested analgesic. Increased risks were, in addition, found for tetracyclines, nitrofurantoin and a history of allergic asthma and a decreased risk found for rheumatic symptoms. The findings stress the nonepidemiological data concerning the potential carcinogenicity of acetaminophen and may be a foundation for future research of some other drugs and diseases.
PubMed ID
7576740 View in PubMed
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Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Program of the Ontario Medical Association: the first 3 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239566
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1985 Jan 1;132(1):19-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-1985
Author
C W Gowdey
M. Brennan
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1985 Jan 1;132(1):19-23
Date
Jan-1-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - adverse effects
Child
Contrast Media - adverse effects
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Edema - chemically induced
Female
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - chemically induced
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario
Abstract
This paper describes the Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Program developed and operated by the Committee on Drugs and Pharmaco-therapy of the Ontario Medical Association. Analyses were done to demonstrate some of the trends derived from the reports. Some of the clinical observations based on the reports, which are published quarterly and circulated to physicians and to pharmacy, nursing and hospital organizations, are also reviewed.
Notes
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Cites: JAMA. 1975 Dec 22;234(12):1236-411242749
Cites: JAMA. 1976 AUG 9;236(6):575-8947238
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1978 Dec 9;119(11):1315-6, 1319737607
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1979 Feb;90(2):257-61443660
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1979 May 19;120(10):1200-1445256
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1984 Aug 1;131(3):189-916744164
Cites: Clin Pharmacol Ther. 1981 Aug;30(2):239-457249508
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1982 Jan 23;284(6311):249-526799125
Cites: Folia Morphol (Praha). 1982;30(3):285-907141344
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Apr 15;128(8):921-56339023
Cites: JAMA. 1983 Apr 22-29;249(16):2224-56339764
Cites: JAMA. 1983 Apr 22-29;249(16):2226-286834622
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1981 Apr 4;282(6270):1131-26786470
PubMed ID
3871167 View in PubMed
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Adverse drug reactions reported for systemic antibacterials in Danish children over a decade.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139649
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2010 Nov;70(5):765-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Lise Aagaard
Ebba Holme Hansen
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2010 Nov;70(5):765-8
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - statistics & numerical data
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Bacterial Infections - drug therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Notes
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 1999 Oct;88(10):1131-610565462
Cites: Arch Dermatol. 2000 Jul;136(7):849-5410890986
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Aug 17;313(7054):387-918761224
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 1998 Feb;87(2):218-249512212
Cites: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1999 Apr;18(4):333-710223685
Cites: Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2010 Oct;70(4):481-9120840440
Cites: Pharm World Sci. 2008 Oct;30(5):563-7018350372
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2009 Aug;19(4):434-819349289
Cites: Drug Saf. 2010 Apr 1;33(4):327-3920297864
Cites: Sci Transl Med. 2010 Jan 13;2(14):14cm220371464
Cites: Ann Pharmacother. 2007 Apr;41(4):659-6617374628
PubMed ID
21039770 View in PubMed
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An increasing incidence of mastoiditis in children in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90902
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2009;41(2):95-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Finnbogadóttir Anna Freyja
Petersen Hannes
Laxdal Thröstur
Gudbrandsson Fridrik
Gudnason Thörolfur
Haraldsson Asgeir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2009;41(2):95-8
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Infant
Male
Mastoiditis - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Otitis Media - complications - drug therapy
Abstract
The incidence of mastoiditis, a known complication of otitis media, may reflect the incidence and treatment of otitis media. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of mastoiditis in Iceland, especially in children, and the possible correlation with antibiotic usage. Patients with mastoiditis during 1984-2002 were identified and information on antibiotic usage in children in the y 1989-2002 was obtained. 84 patients were diagnosed with mastoiditis during 1984-2002, 52 (62%) of whom were less than 18 y of age. 26 (50%) children were less than 3 y of age. During the y 1999-2002, 28 children were diagnosed with mastoiditis, of whom 15 (54%) were diagnosed with otitis media within a week prior to admission. 11 (73%) were treated with antibiotics and 4 (27%) were not. During 1989-2002 a correlation was detected between decreased antibiotic usage in children and increased incidence of mastoiditis (r=-0.68; p=0.007). Following changes in guidelines for antibiotic prescriptions for otitis media in Iceland during the 1990s, antibiotic usage decreased but the incidence of mastoiditis increased. It is uncertain if this is a causal relationship. It is important to treat otitis media correctly while being alert for complications, especially in young children.
PubMed ID
19065449 View in PubMed
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Source
Pol J Pathol. 1996;47(1):13-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
Y O Pospishil
T M Antonovich
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathological Anatomy, Medical University, Lviv, Ukraine.
Source
Pol J Pathol. 1996;47(1):13-7
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects
Biopsy
Humans
Kidney Diseases - chemically induced - pathology
Abstract
Renal biopsies of 43 patients who developed renal complications after treatment with antibiotics were studied. The treatment with antibiotics in these cases was used for many different reasons such as: bronchitis, bronchopneumonia, cystitis, tonsillitis, sepsis, peritonitis, gangrene of the foot and tuberculosis. The renal function of these patients, before the treatment with antibiotics was normal. The biopsies were studied by light, electron and immunofluorescence microscopy. In 43 cases treated with antibiotics renal changes were shown. Three types of morphologic changes were found: acute tubular necrosis (ATN) (13 cases), acute tubulo-interstitial diseases (ATID) (21 cases), focal glomerulonephritis with crescents (FGN) (9 cases). The renal pathologic changes were most commonly seen in patients treated with 2 groups of antibiotics: aminoglycosides (21 cases) and antibiotics of the penicillin group (15 cases). The most characteristic feature of aminoglycosides is their direct toxic effect leading to ATN. Antibiotics of the penicillin type more commonly caused an allergic reaction leading to ATID (secondary to cellular mechanisms) or FGN (secondary to a predominantly humoral mechanism). Renal changes in the use of other antibiotics were much less manifest and were usually due to a hypersensitivity reaction. Cephalosporins, if used in combination with other antibiotics can increase their nephrotoxicity.
PubMed ID
8705264 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic exposure and risk of Parkinson's disease in Finland: A nationwide case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature312111
Source
Mov Disord. 2020 03; 35(3):431-442
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2020
Author
Tuomas H Mertsalmi
Eero Pekkonen
Filip Scheperjans
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Helsinki University Hospital and Department of Clinical Neurosciences (Neurology), University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Mov Disord. 2020 03; 35(3):431-442
Date
03-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Humans
Parkinson Disease - drug therapy - epidemiology
Abstract
Gut microbiota alterations have been found in prodromal and established Parkinson's disease (PD). Antibiotic exposure can have long-term effects on the composition of human intestinal microbiota, but a potential connection between antibiotic exposure and risk of PD has not been studied previously.
To evaluate the impact of antibiotic exposure on the risk of PD in a nationwide, register-based, case-control study.
We identified all patients who were diagnosed with PD in Finland during the years 1998 to 2014. Information was obtained on individual purchases of orally administered antibiotics during the years 1993 to 2014. We assessed the association between prior antibiotic exposure and PD using conditional logistic regression.
The study population consisted of 13,976 PD cases and 40,697 controls. The strongest connection with PD risk was found for oral exposure to macrolides and lincosamides (adjusted odds ratio up to 1.416; 95% confidence interval, 1.053-1.904). After correction for multiple comparisons, exposure to antianaerobics and tetracyclines 10 to 15?years before the index date, sulfonamides and trimethoprim 1 to 5?years before the index date, and antifungal medications 1 to 5?years before the index date were positively associated with PD risk. In post hoc analyses, further positive associations were found for broad-spectrum antibiotics.
Exposure to certain types of oral antibiotics seems to be associated with an elevated risk of PD with a delay that is consistent with the proposed duration of a prodromal period. The pattern of associations supports the hypothesis that effects on gut microbiota could link antibiotics to PD, but further studies are needed to confirm this. © 2019 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
PubMed ID
31737957 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic exposure in infancy and risk of being overweight in the first 24 months of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263743
Source
Pediatrics. 2015 Apr;135(4):617-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Antti Saari
Lauri J Virta
Ulla Sankilampi
Leo Dunkel
Harri Saxen
Source
Pediatrics. 2015 Apr;135(4):617-26
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Body Height - drug effects
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Macrolides - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Overweight - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk
Sex Factors
Statistics as Topic
Weight Gain - drug effects
Abstract
Antibiotics have direct effects on the human intestinal microbiota, particularly in infancy. Antibacterial agents promote growth in farm animals by unknown mechanisms, but little is known about their effects on human weight gain. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of antibiotic exposure during infancy on weight and height in healthy Finnish children.
The population-based cohort comprised 6114 healthy boys and 5948 healthy girls having primary care weight and height measurements and drug purchase data from birth to 24 months. BMI and height, expressed as z-scores at the median age of 24 months (interquartile range 24 to 26 months), were compared between children exposed and unexposed to antibiotics using analysis of covariance with perinatal factors as covariates.
Exposed children were on average heavier than unexposed children (adjusted BMI-for-age z-score difference in boys 0.13 SD [95% confidence interval 0.07 to 0.19, P 1 exposure (boys 0.20 [0.10 to 0.30]; girls 0.13 [0.03 to 0.22]).
Antibiotic exposure before 6 months of age, or repeatedly during infancy, was associated with increased body mass in healthy children. Such effects may play a role in the worldwide childhood obesity epidemic and highlight the importance of judicious use of antibiotics during infancy, favoring narrow-spectrum antibiotics.
PubMed ID
25825533 View in PubMed
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151 records – page 1 of 16.