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506 records – page 1 of 51.

A 15-month evaluation of the effects of repeated subgingival minocycline in chronic adult periodontitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201582
Source
J Periodontol. 1999 Jun;70(6):657-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
D. van Steenberghe
B. Rosling
P O Söder
R G Landry
U. van der Velden
M F Timmerman
E F McCarthy
G. Vandenhoven
C. Wouters
M. Wilson
J. Matthews
H N Newman
Author Affiliation
Catholic University, Leuven, Belgium.
Source
J Periodontol. 1999 Jun;70(6):657-67
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans - drug effects
Analysis of Variance
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Campylobacter - drug effects
Canada
Chronic Disease
Colony Count, Microbial
Dental Plaque Index
Dental Scaling
Double-Blind Method
Eikenella corrodens - drug effects
Europe
Female
Fusobacterium nucleatum - drug effects
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Minocycline - administration & dosage
Ointments
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - drug therapy - microbiology
Periodontitis - drug therapy - microbiology
Porphyromonas gingivalis - drug effects
Prevotella intermedia - drug effects
Statistics, nonparametric
Treatment Outcome
Treponema - drug effects
Abstract
A double-blind, randomized, parallel, comparative study was designed to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of subgingivally administered minocycline ointment versus a vehicle control.
One hundred four patients (104) with moderate to severe adult periodontitis (34 to 64 years of age; mean 46 years) were enrolled in the study. Following scaling and root planing, patients were randomized to receive either 2% minocycline ointment or a matched vehicle control. Study medication was administered directly into the periodontal pocket with a specially designed, graduated, disposable applicator at baseline; week 2; and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12. Scaling and root planing was repeated at months 6 and 12. Standard clinical variables (including probing depth and attachment level) were evaluated at baseline and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15. Microbiological sampling using DNA probes was done at baseline; at week 2; and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15.
Both treatment groups showed significant and clinically relevant reductions in the numbers of each of the 7 microorganisms measured during the entire 15-month study period. When differences were detected, sites treated with minocycline ointment always produced statistically significantly greater reductions than sites which received the vehicle control. For initial pockets > or =5 mm, a mean reduction in probing depth of 1.9 mm was seen in the test sites, versus 1.2 mm in the control sites. Sites with a baseline probing depth > or =7 mm and bleeding index >2 showed an average of 2.5 mm reduction with minocycline versus 1.5 mm with the vehicle. Gains in attachment (0.9 mm and 1.1 mm) were observed in minocycline-treated sites, with baseline probing depth > or =5 mm and > or =7 mm, respectively, compared with 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm gain at control sites. Subgingival administration of minocycline ointment was well tolerated.
Overall, the results demonstrate that repeated subgingival administration of minocycline ointment in the treatment of adult periodontitis is safe and leads to significant adjunctive improvement after subgingival instrumentation in both clinical and microbiologic variables over a 15-month period.
PubMed ID
10397521 View in PubMed
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Acrylic bone cements: clinical developments and current status: Scandinavia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177419
Source
Orthop Clin North Am. 2005 Jan;36(1):55-61, vi
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Lars Lidgren
Otto Robertson
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital, SE-221 85, Lund, Sweden. lars.lidgren@ort.lu.se
Source
Orthop Clin North Am. 2005 Jan;36(1):55-61, vi
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Arthroplasty, Replacement
Bone Cements - therapeutic use
Drug Delivery Systems
Humans
Joint Prosthesis - adverse effects
Polymethyl Methacrylate - therapeutic use
Prosthesis Failure
Prosthesis-Related Infections - prevention & control
Scandinavia
Abstract
This article focuses on bone cement, the cementing technique used, and their influence on aseptic loosening and infection of acrylic and joint implants--Scandinavian view.
PubMed ID
15542123 View in PubMed
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[Acute hematogenous osteomyelitis and purulent arthritis in childhood. A 10-year study from the county of Copenhagen with a follow-up]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13937
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Sep 2;164(36):4177-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2-2002
Author
Peter Christiansen
Birgitte Frederiksen
Miroslaw Jens Glazowski
Michael Scavenius
Finn Ursin Knudsen
Author Affiliation
Børneafdelingen, Amtssygehuset i Glostrup, DK-2600 Glostrup.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Sep 2;164(36):4177-81
Date
Sep-2-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Arthritis, Infectious - complications - epidemiology - microbiology - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Osteomyelitis - complications - epidemiology - microbiology - therapy
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The proper treatment of patients with acute haematogenous osteomyelitis and acute suppurative arthritis is still controversial. Based on a previous study, a treatment regimen was recommended. We now report on the clinical, bacteriological, and radiological aspects of the diseases, with special attention to possible changes in the natural history of the diseases and the long-term prognosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 69 children with acute haematogenous osteomyelitis and 48 with septic arthritis admitted in the period 1977-1987 were entered in a retrospective review. Epidemiological and bacteriological data were analysed and compared to those of an earlier study (1965-1974), confined to the same geographical area. Long-term outcome was assessed by a questionnaire and clinical-radiographic follow-up. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: A significant increase in the admission rate for both disorders was seen. The long-term outcome was favourable, with major sequelae found in only three patients (3%) and minor sequelae in two patients (2%). The benign long-term outcome may well be related to quick admittance to hospitals and long-lasting, appropriate antibiotic treatment.
PubMed ID
12362830 View in PubMed
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[Acute otitis media is not treated according to recommendations. Survey of treatment patterns in emergency centers and community health centers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30054
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Oct 7;101(41):3142-3, 3146
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-7-2004
Author
Anna Lundborg Ander
Robert Eggertsen
Author Affiliation
Lindome vårdcentral.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Oct 7;101(41):3142-3, 3146
Date
Oct-7-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Child, Preschool
Clinical Competence
Community Health Centers
Comparative Study
Emergency medical services
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Otitis Media - drug therapy
Penicillin V - administration & dosage
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines
Prescriptions, Drug
Sweden
Abstract
Usual recommended treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) is antibiotics or expectancy. Different parts of Europe have varying therapy with Holland as an example of more restrictive use of antibiotics. The purpose with this study was to see differences in treatment length, choice of antibiotics, and differences in handling on daytime and emergency hours. 432 case records of children, aged up to ten years were retrospectively investigated. The result shows that antibiotics were prescribed to all except five patients. First choice of antibiotic (70 per cent) was penicillin V that also was more used at emergency hours than daytime at the health centre. Treatment time varied from five to ten days in contrast to national recommendations of five-day therapy. Registrars preferred five-day therapy and specialists seven days. We conclude that penicillin V is first choice of treatment in AOM, that treatment time varies from five to ten days without any underlying reasons and that expectancy was used only in very few cases.
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2004 Nov 18;101(47):3824, 382715609540
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2004 Oct 28;101(44):3461; author reply 346115560664
PubMed ID
15517708 View in PubMed
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The adequacy of timely empiric antibiotic therapy for ventilator-associated pneumonia: an important determinant of outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129145
Source
J Crit Care. 2012 Jun;27(3):322.e7-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
John G Muscedere
Andrew F Shorr
Xuran Jiang
Andrew Day
Daren K Heyland
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. muscedej@kgh.kari.net
Source
J Crit Care. 2012 Jun;27(3):322.e7-14
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Ciprofloxacin - administration & dosage
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Humans
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario - epidemiology
Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated - drug therapy - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Thienamycins - administration & dosage
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The individual impact of timeliness vs adequacy of empiric antibiotic therapy for a clinical suspicion of ventilator-associated pneumonia (CSVAP) is unknown. Accordingly, in patients with CSVAP and timely initiation of empiric antibiotic therapy, we determined the impact of inadequate therapy (IT).
Analysis of a randomized trial of CSVAP treated empirically with meropenem or meropenem plus ciprofloxacin was done. Adequate therapy (AT) was considered present if all pathogens in the index culture were sensitive to the empiric antibiotics; IT was defined as the presence of pathogens resistant to the empiric antibiotics. A priori, for Pseudomonas sp, 2 antibiotics with activity against the organisms were required for AT to be considered present.
Of 739 patients with CSVAP, 350 had positive cultures: 313 (89.4%) had AT, and 37 (10.6%), IT. The IT group had higher intensive care unit (35.1% vs 11.8%, P = .0001) and hospital mortalities (48.7% vs 19.5%, P
PubMed ID
22137378 View in PubMed
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Adherence and barriers to H. pylori treatment in Arctic Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105338
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22791
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Megan Lefebvre
Hsiu-Ju Chang
Amy Morse
Sander Veldhuyzen van Zanten
Karen Jean Goodman
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22791
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Helicobacter Infections - drug therapy - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Proton Pump Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Sex Distribution
Young Adult
Abstract
Helicobacter pylori infection is an emerging health concern to some northern Canadian Aboriginal communities and their clinicians. Clinicians in the north perceive H. pylori infection to be a major clinical problem because they find H. pylori infection in many patients evaluated for common stomach complaints, leading to frequent demand for treatment, which often fails. Moreover, public health authorities identified the need for information to develop locally appropriate H. pylori control strategies. We described adherence and identified barriers to completing treatment among H. pylori-positive participants in a community-based project inspired by local concerns about H. pylori infection risks.
In 2008, 110 H. pylori-positive participants (diagnosed by a breath test, histopathology and/or culture) of the Aklavik H. pylori project were randomised to standard-of-care or sequential treatment. We ascertained adherence by interviewing participants using a structured questionnaire. We estimated adherence frequencies as the proportion of participants who reported taking either 100% of doses (perfect adherence) or =80% of doses (good adherence). To compare the proportion with perfect or good adherence in subgroups, we report proportion differences and 95% confidence intervals (CI).
Of 87 participants who were interviewed, 64% reported perfect adherence and 80% reported good adherence. We observed more frequent perfect adherence for: standard therapy (67%) versus sequential (62%); males (76%) versus females (52%); participants 40-77 years (79%) versus 17-39 (50%). Proportion differences were 5% (CI: -15, 25) for standard versus sequential therapy; 23% (CI: 4, 43) for male versus female; and 29% (CI: 10, 48) for 40-77 versus 15-39 years for perfect adherence. Of the 29 participants who reported poor adherence (
Notes
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Cites: Hypertension. 1980 Nov-Dec;2(6):757-647007235
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Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2005 Jul;19(7):412-416010302
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Nov 1;41(9):1261-816206100
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PubMed ID
24416723 View in PubMed
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Adherence to treatment guidelines for acute otitis media in children. The necessity of an effective strategy of guideline implementation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260250
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2014 Jul;78(7):1128-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Jimmy Célind
Liv Södermark
Ola Hjalmarson
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2014 Jul;78(7):1128-32
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Child, Preschool
Clinical Audit
Education, Medical
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Otitis Media - therapy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Watchful Waiting
Abstract
Acute otitis media is the single diagnosis responsible for most prescriptions of antibiotics in Sweden and the USA. The treatment of acute otitis media has significant impact on child health, healthcare costs, and the development of anti-microbial resistance. In the Swedish national guidelines from the year 2000, watchful waiting was recommended for most children over 2 years of age. The aims of the present study were to assess the degree of adherence to acute otitis media guidelines at a busy pediatric emergency department of a university hospital and to determine whether an information campaign changed the result.
Audit of 91 patient records before and 80 patient records after an information campaign consisting of an oral presentation, posting of flow charts, and sending of educational material to prescribing physicians. Four endpoints were studied: choosing to use antibiotics, choice of antibiotic, dosage of antibiotic, and duration of treatment.
Before the information campaign, adherence to guidelines was between 70% (dosage) and around 90% (duration). No significant change was seen after the information campaign. The endpoint choosing to use antibiotics showed a large divergence in adherence in children under 2 years (96%) compared to older children (39%).
Overall adherence to recommendations was 70-90% but adherence to watchful waiting was poor. Information did not improve adherence, suggesting insufficient educational power or the existence of barriers other than lack of knowledge. Specific barriers should be identified, and implementation and follow-up should be part of producing guidelines in order to achieve the desired results.
PubMed ID
24852449 View in PubMed
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Adjustment of antibiotic treatment according to the results of blood cultures leads to decreased antibiotic use and costs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171349
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2006 Feb;57(2):326-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Dag Berild
Atefeh Mohseni
Lien My Diep
Mogens Jensenius
Signe Holta Ringertz
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Aker University Hospital, N-0514 Oslo, Norway. dag.berild@medisin.uio.no
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2006 Feb;57(2):326-30
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - economics - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - blood - drug therapy - economics
Drug Costs
Escherichia coli - drug effects
Female
Gram-Negative Bacteria - drug effects
Gram-Positive Bacteria - drug effects
Guidelines as Topic
Hospitals, University - economics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To avoid the use of unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotics, empirical therapy of bacteraemia should be adjusted according to the results of blood cultures.
To investigate whether the results of blood cultures led to changes in antibiotic use and costs in a tertiary-care university hospital in Norway.
Medical records from all patients with positive blood cultures in 2001 were analysed retrospectively. Factors predisposing to infections, results of blood cultures, antibiotic use and outcome were recorded. The influence of blood culture results on antibiotic treatment and costs were analysed.
The antibiotic use in 226 episodes of bacteraemia in 214 patients was analysed. According to the guidelines empirical antibiotic treatment should be adjusted in 166 episodes. Antibiotic use was adjusted in 146 (88%) of these 166 episodes, which led to a narrowing of therapy in 118 (80%) episodes. Compared with empirical therapy there was a 22% reduction in the number of antibiotics. Adjustment of therapy was more often performed in Gram-negative bacteraemia and polymicrobial cultures than in Gram-positive bacteraemia. In bacteraemia caused by ampicillin-resistant Escherichia coli, ampicillin was mostly replaced by ciprofloxacin. The cost for 7 days adjusted therapy in 146 episodes was euro19,800 (23%) less than for 7 days of empirical therapy.
Adjustment of antibiotic therapy according to the results of blood cultures led to a reduction in the number of antibiotics and a narrowing of antibiotic therapy. The costs for antibiotics decreased.
PubMed ID
16387751 View in PubMed
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506 records – page 1 of 51.