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Are young adults with asthma treated sufficiently with inhaled steroids? A population-based study of prescription data from 1991 and 1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15857
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1996 Apr;41(4):285-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
D. Gaist
J. Hallas
N C Hansen
L F Gram
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Odense University, Denmark.
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1996 Apr;41(4):285-9
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Drug Information Services
Female
Humans
Male
Pharmacoepidemiology
Abstract
1. We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study of asthma therapy among young adults to assess to what extent the current guidelines for asthma therapy have been implemented. In particular, we examined the use of inhaled corticosteroids in heavy users of inhaled beta-adrenoceptor agonists. 2. Data were retrieved from a population-based prescription database. For each of the years 1991 and 1994, all 20 to 44-year-olds who redeemed anti-asthma medication in the Odense area (210,000 inhabitants) were studied. 3. We identified the number of users and total sales volume for specific anti-asthma medications in defined daily doses (DDD) as well as the number of users and median annual doses of common regimens. Combined use of inhaled corticosteroids and inhaled beta-adrenoceptor agonists was also described. 4. The annual sales volume of anti-asthma drugs increased by 23% to 927,636 DDD from 1991 to 1994. Inhaled corticosteroids were mainly responsible for this with a 52% increase in number of users and an 88% increase in DDD. Inhaled beta-adrenoceptor agonists used in monotherapy remained the most popular regimen in 1994 (1685 users = 39%). Inhaled corticosteroids in combination with inhaled beta-adrenoceptor agonist were the second most popular regimen in 1994 (1308 users = 30%), increasing by 64% as compared with 1991. However, among patients with an annual use of inhaled beta-adrenoceptor agonist of 200 DDD (1600 "puffs') or more the percent of patients not receiving inhaled corticosteroids at all only fell from 37 to 33%. Though the number of patients being treated with inhaled corticosteroids has increased, there is still evidence of a substantial underuse.
PubMed ID
8730973 View in PubMed
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Asthma, ear problems, and dental anxiety among 6- to 8-yr-olds in Denmark: a population-based cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15217
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2003 Dec;111(6):472-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Pia Wogelius
Sven Poulsen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Oral Health and Pediatric Dentistry, Dental School, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2003 Dec;111(6):472-6
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dental Anxiety - epidemiology - psychology
Dental Care for Children - psychology
Dental Health Surveys
Humans
Otitis - epidemiology
Personality Tests
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Statistics
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the association between asthma, ear problems, and dental anxiety in children in a population-based cross-sectional study. The population included four municipalities in the County of North Jutland, Denmark, in 2001. A total of 1235 children aged 6-8 yr, and their parents, were identified. Data were obtained from a prescription database, from parental-answered questionnaires, and from dental records. Children with asthma were defined as children that had received prescriptions for both inhaled beta2-agonists and corticosteroids during the past year. Data on ear problems and dental anxiety were obtained from the questionnaires. Dental anxiety was measured using the Children's Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS). Use of asthma-drugs was associated with dental anxiety (odds ratio = 1.70; 95% confidence interval 0.90-3.22). A history of often ear problems was also associated with dental anxiety (odds ratio = 1.83; 95% confidence interval 1.20-2.80). It is concluded that asthma and ear problems may be risk factors for dental anxiety in children.
PubMed ID
14632682 View in PubMed
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Asthma in Canada: missing the treatment targets.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157872
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Apr 8;178(8):1027-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-8-2008
Author
Kenneth R Chapman
Author Affiliation
Asthma and Airway Centre, University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. kchapman@ca.inter.net
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Apr 8;178(8):1027-8
Date
Apr-8-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - epidemiology
Canada
Data Collection
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Quality of Health Care
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 1999 Nov 30;161(11 Suppl):S1-6110906907
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 Apr 8;178(8):1013-2118390944
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2000 Nov;16(5):802-711153575
Cites: Can Respir J. 2001 Mar-Apr;8 Suppl A:35A-40A11360046
Cites: Can Respir J. 2001 Nov-Dec;8(6):416-2011753454
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2002 Oct;110(4):576-8112373264
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004 Jul;114(1):40-715241342
Cites: Can Respir J. 2004 May-Jun;11 Suppl A:9A-18A15254605
Cites: J Asthma. 2004 Aug;41(5):559-6515360065
Cites: CMAJ. 1987 Oct 1;137(7):620-43651927
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1992 Feb 20;326(8):501-61346340
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Mar 15;154(6):821-318634960
Cites: Can Respir J. 2006 Jul-Aug;13(5):253-916896426
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2008 Feb;31(2):320-517959642
Comment On: CMAJ. 2008 Apr 8;178(8):1013-2118390944
PubMed ID
18390947 View in PubMed
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Attenuation of the September epidemic of asthma exacerbations in children: a randomized, controlled trial of montelukast added to usual therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161582
Source
Pediatrics. 2007 Sep;120(3):e702-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Neil W Johnston
Piush J Mandhane
Jennifer Dai
Joanne M Duncan
Justina M Greene
Kim Lambert
Malcolm R Sears
Author Affiliation
Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health, St Joseph's Healthcare, 50 Charlton Ave E, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 4A6. njohnsto@mcmaster.ca
Source
Pediatrics. 2007 Sep;120(3):e702-12
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetates - therapeutic use
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Age Factors
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Common Cold - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Double-Blind Method
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Office visits - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Quinolines - therapeutic use
Schools
Seasons
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Abstract
A recurring epidemic of asthma exacerbations in children occurs annually in September in North America when school resumes after summer vacation.
Our goal was to determine whether montelukast, added to usual asthma therapy, would reduce days with worse asthma symptoms and unscheduled physician visits of children during the September epidemic.
A total of 194 asthmatic children aged 2 to 14 years, stratified according to age group (2-5, 6-9, and 10-14 years) and gender, participated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the addition of montelukast to usual asthma therapy between September 1 and October 15, 2005.
Children randomly assigned to receive montelukast experienced a 53% reduction in days with worse asthma symptoms compared with placebo (3.9% vs 8.3%) and a 78% reduction in unscheduled physician visits for asthma (4 [montelukast] vs 18 [placebo] visits). The benefit of montelukast was seen both in those using and not using regular inhaled corticosteroids and among those reporting and not reporting colds during the trial. There were differences in efficacy according to age and gender. Boys aged 2 to 5 years showed greater benefit from montelukast (0.4% vs 8.8% days with worse asthma symptoms) than did older boys, whereas among girls the treatment effect was most evident in 10- to 14-year-olds (4.6% [montelukast] vs 17.0% [placebo]), with nonsignificant effects in younger girls.
Montelukast added to usual treatment reduced the risk of worsened asthma symptoms and unscheduled physician visits during the predictable annual September asthma epidemic. Treatment-effect differences observed between age and gender groups require additional investigation.
Notes
Comment In: Pediatrics. 2008 Jun;121(6):1289; author reply 1289-9018519503
PubMed ID
17766511 View in PubMed
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Comparison of the efficacy of salmeterol/fluticasone propionate combination in Japanese and Caucasian asthmatics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94002
Source
Respir Med. 2007 Dec;101(12):2488-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Kawai M.
Kempsford R.
Pullerits T.
Takaori S.
Hashimoto K.
Takemoto Y.
Lötvall J.
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Disease, Kawai Chest Clinic, 43 Koyamakitaohno-cho, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8161, Japan.
Source
Respir Med. 2007 Dec;101(12):2488-94
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Airway Resistance
Albuterol - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Analysis of Variance
Androstadienes - therapeutic use
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Asthma - drug therapy - ethnology - physiopathology
Body Height
Cross-Over Studies
Double-Blind Method
Drug Therapy, Combination
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Japan
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Respiratory Function Tests
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The effect of ethnicity on the efficacy of salmeterol (S)+fluticasone propionate (FP) has not been examined in Japanese and Caucasian asthmatics. In this study, the efficacy of combination treatment with S and FP from a single inhaler (SFC) was compared with concurrent treatment with S and FP administration from separate inhalers (S+FP) in Japanese and Caucasian asthmatics. METHODS: This was a randomised, double-blind, crossover study in male and female Japanese (n=18) and Caucasian (n=17) asthmatics (50-100% predicted FEV(1); >35% reversibility in sGaw). Subjects received SFC (S 50 mcg/FP 250 mcg b.i.d.) and S+FP (S 50 mcg b.i.d.+FP 250 mcg b.i.d.) for 14 days. sGaw and FEV(1) were determined 0-12h after the first and last doses. RESULTS: Treatment with both SFC and S+FP produced marked bronchodilation, which was maintained 0-12h after the first dose. Baseline sGaw and FEV(1) increased up to 51% and 180 mL, respectively, in Japanese subjects over 2 weeks of treatment, with similar improvements in Caucasian subjects. On Day 14 the 0-12h S+FP:SFC treatment ratios (90% CI) for sGaw AUC and peak were 1.05 (0.98, 1.12) and 1.05 (0.97, 1.14), respectively, in Japanese subjects, and 0.99 (0.92, 1.07) and 0.98 (0.89, 1.07), respectively, in Caucasian subjects, with no difference between the two ethnic groups. CONCLUSIONS: The finding of a similar significant bronchodilator response in Japanese and Caucasian asthmatics following concurrent and combination treatment with salmeterol and FP suggests that the therapeutic response to these agents is comparable and independent of ethnicity in Japanese and Caucasian asthma patients.
PubMed ID
17900887 View in PubMed
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Examining asthma quality of care using a population-based approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157873
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Apr 8;178(8):1013-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-8-2008
Author
Helena Klomp
Joshua A Lawson
Donald W Cockcroft
Benjamin T Chan
Paul Cascagnette
Laurie Gander
Derek Jorgenson
Author Affiliation
Health Quality Council, Saskatoon, Sask. hklomp@hqc.sk.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Apr 8;178(8):1013-21
Date
Apr-8-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Age Distribution
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases, Factual
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Quality of Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Asthma accounts for considerable burden on health care, but in most cases, asthma can be controlled. Quality-of-care indicators would aid in monitoring asthma management. We describe the quality of asthma care using a set of proposed quality indicators.
We performed a retrospective cross-sectional study using health databases in Saskatchewan, a Canadian province with a population of about 1 million people. We assessed 6 quality-of-care indicators among people with asthma: admission to hospital because of asthma; poor asthma control (high use of short-acting beta-agonists, admission to hospital because of asthma or death due to asthma); no inhaled corticosteroid use among patients with poor control; at least moderate inhaled corticosteroid use among patients with poor control; high inhaled corticosteroid use and use of another preventer medication among patients with poor control; and any main preventer use among patients with poor control. We calculated crude and adjusted rates with 95% confidence intervals. We tested for differences using the chi2 test for proportions and generalized linear modelling techniques.
In 2002/03, there were 24 616 people aged 5-54 years with asthma in Saskatchewan, representing a prevalence of 3.8%. Poor symptom control was observed in 18% of patients with asthma. Among those with poor control, 37% were not dispensed any inhaled corticosteroids, and 40% received potentially inadequate doses. Among those with poor control who were dispensed high doses of inhaled corticosteroids, 26% also used another preventer medication. Hospital admissions because of asthma were highest among those aged 6-9 years and females aged 20-44 years. Males and those in adult age groups (predominantly 20-44 years) had worse quality of care for 4 indicators examined.
Suboptimal asthma management would be improved through increased use of inhaled corticosteroids and preventer medications, and reduced reliance on short-acting beta-agonist medications as recommended by consensus guidelines.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Apr 3;164(7):995-100111314453
Cites: MMWR Surveill Summ. 2007 Oct 19;56(8):1-5417947969
Cites: Can Respir J. 2001 Mar-Apr;8 Suppl A:5A-27A11360044
Cites: J Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Jun;41(6):668-7611402636
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Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2007 Apr;53(4):672-717872718
Comment In: CMAJ. 2008 Apr 8;178(8):1027-818390947
PubMed ID
18390944 View in PubMed
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Management of asthma in adults: do the patients get what they need--and want?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77249
Source
Allergy Asthma Proc. 2007 May-Jun;28(3):375-81
Publication Type
Article
Author
Backer Vibeke
Ulrik Charlotte S
Harving Henrik
Lange Peter
Søes-Petersen Ulrik
Plaschke Peter P
Author Affiliation
Respiratory and Allergy Research Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen NV, Denmark. backer@dadlnet.dk
Source
Allergy Asthma Proc. 2007 May-Jun;28(3):375-81
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - therapy
Denmark
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Patient Education - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Self Care - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Suboptimal asthma control may be caused by a combination of factors, such as nonadherence to guidelines, lack of compliance, and poor asthma education. The aim was to assess patients' knowledge of asthma and different management strategies, including patients' attitudes toward involvement in treatment decisions. The participants (n=509) were recruited from all parts of Denmark through a web-based panel (Zapera Danmarkspanel). A questionnaire concerning asthma knowledge, compliance, and treatment was fulfilled through the Internet. Among the participating adult asthmatic patients, signs of uncontrolled disease with night asthma (16%), daily symptoms (18%), or exercise-induced asthma (11%) were found. Of 285 participants with persistent asthma, 70% used inhaled corticosteroids. Lung function was measured within the preceding 6 months in 24% of patients, whereas 7% had never had their lung function measured and peak flow monitoring was reported by 5%. Written action plans were provided for 12% of patients and 50% had had their inhaler technique checked. Although 59% of patients were instructed to adjust their controller therapy if needed, only 23% reported that they had done so. In conclusion, this study of adult asthmatic patients revealed an important deficit in patient education, little use of lung function measurements, and poor compliance with guidelines for asthma management. Furthermore, asthmatic patients want more education, although they do not use it when provided by their doctor, indicating that change in educational strategy is needed.
PubMed ID
17619570 View in PubMed
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Quality of life and measures of asthma control in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84725
Source
J Asthma. 2007 Nov;44(9):747-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Lisspers Karin
Ställberg Björn
Hasselgren Mikael
Johansson Gunnar
Svärdsudd Kurt
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. karin.lisspers@ltdalarna.se
Source
J Asthma. 2007 Nov;44(9):747-51
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenal Cortex Hormones - therapeutic use
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Least-Squares Analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
AIM: To study quality of life and asthma control in primary care. A total of 1,477 patients 15 to 45 years of age received questionnaires regarding asthma control (77% responded) and quality of life, Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (MiniAQLQ), (74% responded). Patients using short-acting beta-agonists more than twice in the last week had clinically significant lower MiniAQLQ scores (5.17 versus 5.91). This finding was consistent for night awakenings during the previous week (4.42 versus 5.86), courses of oral corticosteroids (4.82 versus 5.69), and reported emergency consultations during the last 6 months (4.85 versus 5.71). Good asthma control is associated with better quality of life in asthma patients in primary care.
PubMed ID
17994405 View in PubMed
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Recognition of asthma in adolescents and young adults: which objective measure is best?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9117
Source
J Asthma. 2005 Sep;42(7):549-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Charlotte Suppli Ulrik
Dirkje S Postma
Vibeke Backer
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Diseases, Hvidovre Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. csulrik@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Asthma. 2005 Sep;42(7):549-54
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Albuterol - therapeutic use
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Antigens - diagnostic use
Asthma - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Bronchodilator Agents - therapeutic use
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Histamine - diagnostic use
Humans
Intradermal Tests
Lung Volume Measurements
Male
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Predictive value of tests
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Vital Capacity
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Objective assessment of airway function is important in epidemiologic studies of asthma to facilitate comparison between studies. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), peak expiratory flow (PEF) variability, and bronchodilator reversibility (BR) are widely used as markers of airway lability in such studies. Data from a survey of a population sample of adolescents and young adults (n = 609; 288 males), aged 13-23 years, were analyzed to investigate whether AHR, PEF variability, and BR can be used interchangeably as markers of asthma in an epidemiological setting. METHODS: Case history, including self-reported and doctor-diagnosed asthma, smoking habits, and use of asthma medication, was obtained by interview and questionnaire. Lung function, airway responsiveness (positive test: PC20 FEV1 20%), BR (positive test: deltaFEV1 [(FEV1max - FEV1min)/FEV1max) 100] > 10%), blood eosinophil count, and skin prick test reactivity were measured by using standard techniques. RESULTS: The prevalence of a positive test was AHR 16.4%, PEFpos 13.3%, and BRpos 7.2%, respectively; 73.5% of the sample had three negative tests. Among the 74 participants with current self-reported asthma (12.2%), 34 subjects (46%) had more than one positive test. Using AHR as the only objective marker of asthma identified 93% of the participants with current asthma, whereas PEF and BR identified 45% and 10%, respectively. Confining the analysis to participants with only one positive test revealed that 61% of the subjects with isolated AHR had current asthma, whereas none of the subjects with isolated BRpos had asthma, and only one participant with isolated PEFpos had current asthma. Degree of histamine responsiveness was closer associated with other asthma-related factors, including self-reported asthma, use of asthma medication, and level of lung function, than PEF variability and bronchodilator responsiveness. CONCLUSIONS: Airway responsiveness to histamine, diurnal peak-flow variability, and bronchodilator reversibility cannot be used interchangeably as objective markers of asthma in epidemiologic studies. On the basis of the present findings, airway hyperresponsiveness to a nonspecific bronchoconstrictor is recommended as the objective marker of asthma-related airway lability.
PubMed ID
16169787 View in PubMed
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Relationships between duration of asthma and asthma severity among children in the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202937
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1999 Mar;103(3 Pt 1):376-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
R S Zeiger
C. Dawson
S. Weiss
Author Affiliation
Department of Allergy, Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, University of California, San Diego, USA.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1999 Mar;103(3 Pt 1):376-87
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-2 Receptor Agonists
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Albuterol - therapeutic use
Allergens - analysis
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Antigens, Dermatophagoides
Asthma - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - epidemiology
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Bronchodilator Agents - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Glycoproteins - analysis
Housing
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology
Linear Models
Male
Methacholine Chloride - diagnostic use
Multivariate Analysis
Severity of Illness Index
Skin Tests
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
United States - epidemiology
Vital Capacity
Abstract
Many factors, including heredity, atopic status, and environment, have been implicated in the determination of asthma severity. Relatively little is known about the degree to which asthma duration influences asthma severity.
The Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP), consisting of 1041 children (age 8. 9 +/- 2.1 years at enrollment) with mild-to-moderate asthma, offers an opportunity to examine the relationship between asthma duration and asthma severity.
By using the extensive CAMP baseline cross-sectional data on asthma duration, spirometry, bronchial responsiveness, symptomatology, and markers of atopy, univariate and multivariate regression models were used to evaluate whether asthma duration is associated with asthma severity.
Duration of asthma in the study cohort from time of diagnosis until randomization into CAMP ranged from 0.3 to 12.1 years (mean, 5.0; SD, 2.7; median, 4.8). Asthma duration is associated in univariate analyses both with lower levels of several lung functions (P
Notes
Comment In: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1999 Mar;103(3 Pt 1):371-310069867
Comment In: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1999 Nov;104(5):1115-610550765
PubMed ID
10069869 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.