Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Methods for estimating missing human skeletal element osteometric dimensions employed in the revised fully technique for estimating stature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136860
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2011 May;145(1):67-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Benjamin M Auerbach
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, The University of Tennessee-Knoxville, 37996, USA. auerbach@utk.edu
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2011 May;145(1):67-80
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Physical - methods
Anthropometry - methods
Body Height
Bone and Bones - anatomy & histology
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Regression Analysis
Sex Factors
Abstract
One of the greatest limitations to the application of the revised Fully anatomical stature estimation method is the inability to measure some of the skeletal elements required in its calculation. These element dimensions cannot be obtained due to taphonomic factors, incomplete excavation, or disease processes, and result in missing data. This study examines methods of imputing these missing dimensions using observable Fully measurements from the skeleton and the accuracy of incorporating these missing element estimations into anatomical stature reconstruction. These are further assessed against stature estimations obtained from mathematical regression formulae for the lower limb bones (femur and tibia). Two thousand seven hundred and seventeen North and South American indigenous skeletons were measured, and subsets of these with observable Fully dimensions were used to simulate missing elements and create estimation methods and equations. Comparisons were made directly between anatomically reconstructed statures and mathematically derived statures, as well as with anatomically derived statures with imputed missing dimensions. These analyses demonstrate that, while mathematical stature estimations are more accurate, anatomical statures incorporating missing dimensions are not appreciably less accurate and are more precise. The anatomical stature estimation method using imputed missing dimensions is supported. Missing element estimation, however, is limited to the vertebral column (only when lumbar vertebrae are present) and to talocalcaneal height (only when femora and tibiae are present). Crania, entire vertebral columns, and femoral or tibial lengths cannot be reliably estimated. Further discussion of the applicability of these methods is discussed.
PubMed ID
21337315 View in PubMed
Less detail

Stature estimation formulae for indigenous North American populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149767
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2010 Feb;141(2):190-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Benjamin M Auerbach
Christopher B Ruff
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, The University of Tennessee-Knoxville, 37996, USA. auerbach@utk.edu
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2010 Feb;141(2):190-207
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry - methods
Body Size - physiology
Female
Fossils
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Least-Squares Analysis
Leg Bones - anatomy & histology
Male
Models, Theoretical
North America
Sex Factors
Abstract
Stature estimation methods for adult indigenous humans from the Americas have generally relied on a limited number of regression equations. The available equations, however, are not broadly applicable to the diversity of the populations that lived in the New World prior to European colonization. Furthermore, some equations that have been used were originally derived from inappropriate reference samples, such as the "Mongoloid" group measured by Trotter and Gleser (Am J Phys Anthropol 16 [1958] 79-123). This study develops new stature estimation equations for long bones of the lower limb from a geographically diverse sample of North American archaeological sites. Statures were reconstructed from 967 skeletons from 75 archaeological sites using the revised Fully anatomical technique (Raxter et al., Am J Phys Anthropol 130 [2006] 374-384). Archaeological samples were grouped according to general body proportions, using relative tibia and femur length to stature as guides. On the basis of differences in these proportions, three broad groupings were identified: a high latitude "arctic" group, a general "temperate" group, and a Great Plains group. Sex-specific ordinary least squares regression formulae were developed based on femoral and tibial lengths for each of these groups. Comparisons of the new stature estimation equations with previously available equations were conducted using several archaeological test samples. In most cases, the new stature estimation equations are more precise than those previously available, and we recommend their use throughout most of North America. The equations developed by Genovés for Mesoamerican and US Southwest samples are a useful alternative for these regions. Applicability of the new equations to South American samples awaits further testing.
PubMed ID
19591213 View in PubMed
Less detail