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Anthropometric reference data for elderly Swedes and its disease-related pattern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273238
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 Sep;69(9):1066-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
N N Gavriilidou
M. Pihlsgård
S. Elmståhl
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 Sep;69(9):1066-75
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Anthropometry - methods
Body Composition
Body mass index
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - epidemiology
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Reference Values
Sex Distribution
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Anthropometric measurement is a noninvasive and cost-efficient method for nutritional assessment. The study aims to present age- and gender-specific anthropometric reference data for Swedish elderly in relation to common medical conditions, and also formulate prediction equations for such anthropometric measurements.
A cross-sectional study among random heterogeneous sample of 3360 subjects, aged 60-99 years, from a population study 'Good Aging in Scania. Means (±s.d.) and percentiles for height, weight, waist-, hip-, arm-, calf circumferences, triceps- (TST) and subscapular skinfold thickness (SST), body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR) and arm muscle circumference (AMC) were presented. The values were estimated based on the prevalence of myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac failure (CHF), stroke, cognitive impairment, dementia and dependence in daily living activities (ADL). Linear regression analysis was used to formulate the prediction equations.
Mean BMI was 27.5±5.8?kg/m(2) (men) and 27.2±8.1?kg/m(2) (women). WHR was higher among men (Men: 0.98±0.3, women: 0.87±0.2), except at age 85+ (women: 0.91±0.6). TST was 6.7±0.4?mm higher among women. Men with MI had BMI: 28.6±4.8?kg/m(2) and SST: 21±9.2?mm, whereas subjects with dementia had lower weight (by 9.5±2.9?kg) compared with the non-demented. ADL-dependent women had BMI= 29.0±3.9?kg/m(2), TST=19.2±1.3?mm.
New normative data on gender- and age-specific anthropometrics on the general elderly population are presented. Cardiovascular diseases are associated with subcutaneous and central adiposity opposed to fat loss with dementia. ADL dependence indicates inadequate physical activity. The prediction models could be used as possible indicators monitoring physical activity and adiposity among the general elderly population hence potential health indicators in health promotion.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25990690 View in PubMed
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[Cone-beam computed tomography in paleoanthropology].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262352
Source
Vestn Rentgenol Radiol. 2014 Sep-Oct;(5):49-53
Publication Type
Article
Author
A Iu Vasil'ev
A P Buzhilova
E A Egorova
D V Makarova
N Ia Berezina
I S Zorina
V I Khartanovich
Source
Vestn Rentgenol Radiol. 2014 Sep-Oct;(5):49-53
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Physical - methods
Anthropometry - methods
Cone-Beam Computed Tomography - methods
Fractures, Bone - history - radiography
History, 19th Century
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted - methods
Russia
Abstract
To study the capabilities of cone-bean computed tomography (CBCT) in estimating the bone structure when analyzing anthropological findings.
Twenty-four bone fragments (remains) of Napoléon Bonaparte Imperial Army soldiers who had died at a Königsberg military hospital during their retreat from Russia in the War of 1812 were examined by CBCT. A total of 28 tubular bones with different injury healing signs and a skull with maxillofacial trauma marks were investigated. Furthermore, an object from D.G. Rokhlin's paleopathological collection was used to analyze a complicated humeral infectious process. CBCT was performed by individually selecting the scanning foldings, physicotechnical conditions and regimens in relation to the anatomic location and size of fragments.
Processing of the obtained images reveled fractures of different bones in 19 (65.5%) cases. The signs of ununited fractures were visualized in 20.7% of the samples. Image post-processing showed intraarticular consolidated fractures in 13.8% of the anthropological findings. The CBCT examination of bone fragments exhibited the signs of their fusion. A wound pattern was established in 31% of the samples. The specific features of a bone amputation stump could be characterized in detail in 17.2% of the anthropological findings. 51.7% of the cases were found to have signs of sustained bone inflammatory diseases of various genesis, which in 41.4% of them were presented by linear, bulbar, and assimilated periostal reactions and significantly detectable on CBCT scans. Sequestral cavities were imaged in 31% of the fragments.
The CBCT images are characterized by high informative value (from 7.5 to 10.6 pixels/mm), optimal spatial resolution, definition, and hardness. The software of CBCT involves the parameters and possible postprocessing of images (building of panoramic and mulplanar reconstructions, assessment of the density characteristics of tissues), which allow an analysis of anthropological material, by needlessly destroying them.
PubMed ID
25775895 View in PubMed
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High degree of BMI misclassification of malnutrition among Swedish elderly population: Age-adjusted height estimation using knee height and demispan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270064
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 May;69(5):565-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
N N Gavriilidou
M. Pihlsgård
S. Elmståhl
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 May;69(5):565-71
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Anthropometry - methods
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Knee - anatomy & histology
Male
Malnutrition - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Reference Values
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The degree of misclassification of obesity and undernutrition among elders owing to inaccurate height measurements is investigated using height predicted by knee height (KH) and demispan equations.
Cross-sectional investigation was done among a random heterogeneous sample from five municipalities in Southern Sweden from a general population study 'Good Aging in Skåne' (GÅS). The sample comprised two groups: group 1 (KH) including 2839 GÅS baseline participants aged 60-93 years with a valid KH measurement and group 2 (demispan) including 2871 GÅS follow-up examination participants (1573 baseline; 1298 new), aged 60-99 years, with a valid demispan measurement. Participation rate was 80%. Height, weight, KH and demispan were measured. KH and demispan equations were formulated using linear regression analysis among participants aged 60-64 years as reference. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated in kg/m(2).
Undernutrition prevalences in men and women were 3.9 and 8.6% by KH, compared with 2.4 and 5.4% by standard BMI, and more pronounced for all women aged 85+ years (21% vs 11.3%). The corresponding value in women aged 85+ years by demispan was 16.5% vs 10% by standard BMI. Obesity prevalences in men and women were 17.5 and 14.6% by KH, compared with 19.0 and 20.03% by standard BMI. Values among women aged 85+ years were 3.7% vs 10.4% by KH and 6.5% vs 12.7% by demispan compared with the standard.
There is an age-related misclassification of undernutrition and obesity attributed to inaccurate height estimation among the elderly. This could affect the management of patients at true risk. We therefore propose using KH- and demispan-based formulae to address this issue.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25205322 View in PubMed
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[The features of the relationship of the indices of physical and sexual development of teenagers of the city of Chelyabinsk--the industrial center of South Ural].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263729
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Jul-Aug;(4):75-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
A N Uzunova
D A Lopatina
S Yu Petrunina
A R Sharapov
E Kh Kharrasova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Jul-Aug;(4):75-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development
Anthropometry - methods
Body mass index
Child
Child Development
Female
Humans
Male
Russia
Sexual Development
Student Health Services
Students - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - trends
Abstract
There was made a determination of the correlation relationships (CR) between indices of physical and sexual development (SD) of 1997 adolescents aged from 11 years 6 months to 17 years 5 months 29 days residing in the industrial center of the Southern Urals characterized by high levels of air pollution (API 7-13). Benzo(a)pyrene and formaldehyde contribute the greatest part to air pollution. The level of SD, time of appearance of secondary sexual characteristics was revealed to be interrelated with the pace of physical development of adolescents, regardless of the gender Children with an accelerated pace of physical development (macrosomatotype) are characterized by advancing sexual development and the earlier appearance of secondary sexual characteristics. Slow pace of physical development (microsomatotype) is characterized by SD retardation and the later appearance of secondary sexual characteristics. The degree of intensity of secondary sexual characteristics and such anthropometric indices as height, body mass are interrelated and have age and gender differences: the maximal CR for these indices is typical for boys aged from 13 to 16 years as for girls--of 13 and 14 years old.
PubMed ID
25842503 View in PubMed
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