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Growth patterns of Canadian Inuit children. A longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4886
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995 Apr;54(2):60-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
R J Shephard
A. Rode
Author Affiliation
School of Physical & Health Education, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1995 Apr;54(2):60-8
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Anthropometry - methods
Body Height
Body mass index
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Growth
Humans
Inuits
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Abstract
A longitudinal study has examined the growth of height, sitting height, body mass and triceps skinfolds in a sample of Inuit (281 boys and 266 girls) attending the Igloolik school between the years 1981 and 1989. Heights were around the 10th percentile of U.S. norms for 1970. A peak height velocity of 9.2 +/- 2.3 cm/year was reached by girls at 11.3 +/- 0.7 years, and in boys the peak rate of 8.6 +/- 3.7 cm/year was seen at 13.5 +/- 0.8 years. Sitting heights were also low relative to urban norms. Body mass approached the 50th percentile of U.S. norms, giving a large mass for height ratio at all ages. Triceps thicknesses for the girls were around the 10th percentile of urban norms, and in the boys began around the 25th percentile, but dropped steadily to the 5-10th percentile. No significant differences of growth patterns were seen between cohorts formed from students born in the years 1970/72, 1973/74 and 1975/76. However, comparison with earlier cross-sectional surveys in the same community showed a secular trend to greater stature and greater skinfold readings as the community had become acculturated to such features of modern living as mechanized transport and television. There were no systematic differences of growth rates between the summer and the winter seasons, and nutrition was good throughout. We thus conclude that the short stature has an inherited basis. Attention is drawn to the problem of interpreting curves of growth and weight for height in populations with an unusual body build.
PubMed ID
7639887 View in PubMed
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High serum total cholesterol is a long-term cause of osteoporotic fracture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141003
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1615-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
P. Trimpou
A. Odén
T. Simonsson
L. Wilhelmsen
K. Landin-Wilhelmsen
Author Affiliation
Section for Endocrinology, Institution of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, SE-413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden. pinelopi.trimpou@vgregion.se
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1615-20
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropometry - methods
Cholesterol - blood
Coffee - adverse effects
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Osteoporotic Fractures - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Recurrence
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Risk factors for osteoporotic fractures were evaluated in 1,396 men and women for a period of 20 years. Serum total cholesterol was found to be an independent osteoporotic fracture risk factor whose predictive power improves with time.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term risk factors for osteoporotic fracture.
A population random sample of men and women aged 25-64 years (the Gothenburg WHO MONICA project, N?=?1,396, 53% women) was studied prospectively. The 1985 baseline examination recorded physical activity at work and during leisure time, psychological stress, smoking habits, coffee consumption, BMI, waist/hip ratio, blood pressure, total, HDL and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and fibrinogen. Osteoporotic fractures over a period of 20 years were retrieved from the Gothenburg hospital registers. Poisson regression was used to analyze the predictive power for osteoporotic fracture of each risk factor.
A total number of 258 osteoporotic fractures occurred in 143 participants (10.2%). As expected, we found that previous fracture, smoking, coffee consumption, and lower BMI each increase the risk for osteoporotic fracture independently of age and sex. More unexpectedly, we found that the gradient of risk of serum total cholesterol to predict osteoporotic fracture significantly increases over time (p?=?0.0377).
Serum total cholesterol is an independent osteoporotic fracture risk factor whose predictive power improves with time. High serum total cholesterol is a long-term cause of osteoporotic fracture.
PubMed ID
20821192 View in PubMed
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Obesity, smoking and secular trends in cardiovascular risk factors in middle-aged women: data from population studies in Göteborg from 1980 to 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139163
Source
J Intern Med. 2010 Dec;268(6):594-603
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
S. Johansson
L. Wilhelmsen
C. Welin
H. Eriksson
L. Welin
A. Rosengren
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency and Cardiovascular Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra, Göteborg, Sweden. saga.johansson@astrazeneca.com
Source
J Intern Med. 2010 Dec;268(6):594-603
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry - methods
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology
Lipids - blood
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - trends
Stress, Psychological - complications - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To study the trends in cardiovascular risk factors in middle-aged city-dwelling Swedish women from 1980 to 2003.
Using cross-sectional population-based surveys, five random population samples of a total of 1915 women aged between 45 and 54 years, participating in the BEDA study in 1980, WHO MONICA studies in 1985, 1990 and 1995, and a study of 50-year-old women in 2003 were measured for the following parameters: anthropometry, serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels, smoking habits, blood pressure, physical activity and stress.
Over almost 25 years, middle-aged women gained on average 4.4 kg in weight, with a net increase in body mass index (BMI) from 24.7 to 25.6 kg m?². The proportion of participants classified as obese (=30 kg m?²) increased by 50% from 10.4% to 15.1%. Women who were smokers in 2003 did not have lower BMI values than nonsmokers. Mean serum cholesterol concentrations decreased markedly, whereas smoking habits did not significantly change. The prevalence of hypertension decreased by 8%, whereas that of diabetes remained stable at around 2%. Optimal risk factor status - no smoking, normotension and serum cholesterol
PubMed ID
21091809 View in PubMed
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[The features of the relationship of the indices of physical and sexual development of teenagers of the city of Chelyabinsk--the industrial center of South Ural].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263729
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Jul-Aug;(4):75-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
A N Uzunova
D A Lopatina
S Yu Petrunina
A R Sharapov
E Kh Kharrasova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Jul-Aug;(4):75-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development
Anthropometry - methods
Body mass index
Child
Child Development
Female
Humans
Male
Russia
Sexual Development
Student Health Services
Students - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - trends
Abstract
There was made a determination of the correlation relationships (CR) between indices of physical and sexual development (SD) of 1997 adolescents aged from 11 years 6 months to 17 years 5 months 29 days residing in the industrial center of the Southern Urals characterized by high levels of air pollution (API 7-13). Benzo(a)pyrene and formaldehyde contribute the greatest part to air pollution. The level of SD, time of appearance of secondary sexual characteristics was revealed to be interrelated with the pace of physical development of adolescents, regardless of the gender Children with an accelerated pace of physical development (macrosomatotype) are characterized by advancing sexual development and the earlier appearance of secondary sexual characteristics. Slow pace of physical development (microsomatotype) is characterized by SD retardation and the later appearance of secondary sexual characteristics. The degree of intensity of secondary sexual characteristics and such anthropometric indices as height, body mass are interrelated and have age and gender differences: the maximal CR for these indices is typical for boys aged from 13 to 16 years as for girls--of 13 and 14 years old.
PubMed ID
25842503 View in PubMed
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