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Bone material strength is associated with areal BMD but not with prevalent fractures in older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278153
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 Apr;27(4):1585-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
R. Rudäng
M. Zoulakis
D. Sundh
H. Brisby
A. Diez-Perez
L. Johansson
D. Mellström
A. Darelid
M. Lorentzon
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 Apr;27(4):1585-92
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon - methods
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry - methods
Bone Density - physiology
Bone Diseases, Metabolic - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hip Joint - physiopathology
Humans
Lumbar Vertebrae - physiopathology
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - physiopathology
Osteoporotic Fractures - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Spinal Fractures - epidemiology - physiopathology
Stress, mechanical
Sweden - epidemiology
Tibia - physiology - physiopathology
Abstract
Reference point indentation is a novel method to assess bone material strength index (BMSi) in vivo. We found that BMSi at the mid-tibia was weakly associated with spine and hip areal bone mineral density but not with prevalent fracture in a population-based cohort of 211 older women.
Reference point indentation is a novel method to assess BMSi in vivo. Lower BMSi has been observed in patients with prior fracture than in controls, but no association between BMSi and areal bone mineral density (aBMD) has been found. Population-based association studies and prospective studies with BMSi and fractures are lacking. We hypothesized that BMSi would be associated with prevalent fractures in older Swedish women. The aim was to investigate the associations between BMSi, aBMD, and prevalent fracture in older women.
Two hundred eleven women, mean age 78.3?±?1.1 years, were included in this cross-sectional, population-based study. BMSi was assessed using the OsteoProbe device at the mid-tibia. Areal BMD of the hip, spine, and non-dominant radius was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Fracture history was retrieved using questionnaires, and vertebral fractures were identified using vertebral fracture assessment (VFA) by DXA.
One hundred ninety-eight previous fractures in 109 subjects were reported. A total of 106 women had a vertebral fracture, of which 58 women had moderate or severe fractures. An inverse correlation between BMSi and weight (r?=?-0.14, p?=?0.04) was seen, and BMSi differed according to operator (ANOVA p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
26630975 View in PubMed
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[The features of the relationship of the indices of physical and sexual development of teenagers of the city of Chelyabinsk--the industrial center of South Ural].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263729
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Jul-Aug;(4):75-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
A N Uzunova
D A Lopatina
S Yu Petrunina
A R Sharapov
E Kh Kharrasova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2014 Jul-Aug;(4):75-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Development
Anthropometry - methods
Body mass index
Child
Child Development
Female
Humans
Male
Russia
Sexual Development
Student Health Services
Students - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - trends
Abstract
There was made a determination of the correlation relationships (CR) between indices of physical and sexual development (SD) of 1997 adolescents aged from 11 years 6 months to 17 years 5 months 29 days residing in the industrial center of the Southern Urals characterized by high levels of air pollution (API 7-13). Benzo(a)pyrene and formaldehyde contribute the greatest part to air pollution. The level of SD, time of appearance of secondary sexual characteristics was revealed to be interrelated with the pace of physical development of adolescents, regardless of the gender Children with an accelerated pace of physical development (macrosomatotype) are characterized by advancing sexual development and the earlier appearance of secondary sexual characteristics. Slow pace of physical development (microsomatotype) is characterized by SD retardation and the later appearance of secondary sexual characteristics. The degree of intensity of secondary sexual characteristics and such anthropometric indices as height, body mass are interrelated and have age and gender differences: the maximal CR for these indices is typical for boys aged from 13 to 16 years as for girls--of 13 and 14 years old.
PubMed ID
25842503 View in PubMed
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Value of standardized gestational age charts for fetuses of first-generation Oriental immigrants to Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215468
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 1995 Apr;46(2):111-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1995
Author
A M Arenson
P L Chan
C. Withers
C. Leonhardt
J. Kan
A. Luong
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiological Sciences, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, North York, ON.
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 1995 Apr;46(2):111-3
Date
Apr-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry - methods
Asia - ethnology
Canada
Female
Fetus - anatomy & histology
Gestational Age
Humans
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Abstract
to ascertain if standard gestational age charts can be used to accurately predict the gestational age of fetuses of first-generation Oriental immigrants to Canada.
Over a 3-year period, all patients presenting for obstetric ultrasound examinations were invited to participate in the study. The authors recorded biparietal diameter, head circumference, femur length and abdominal circumference for 139 fetuses in the second and third trimesters. A study performed in the first trimester was used as the baseline for gestational age. The data for 126 of the fetuses were complete, and these data were used for the analysis.
For 77 of the fetuses, both parents were Oriental, and for 49, one or both parents were not Oriental; the latter constituted the control group. A total of 1008 individual measurements were obtained, and of these, all but 14 fell within two standard deviations of the norm, according to standard gestational age charts. Of the abnormal measurements, seven were obtained from five fetuses with Oriental parents, and seven were obtained from six fetuses in the control group. The difference between the two groups in the proportion of measurements falling either above or below two standard deviations from the norm was not statistically significant (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.41694).
The authors conclude that standard gestational age charts can be used to determine gestational age in first-generation Oriental immigrants to Canada.
PubMed ID
7704672 View in PubMed
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