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2D:4D finger length ratio and reproductive indices in a Chuvashian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108304
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2013 Sep-Oct;25(5):617-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
Leonid Kalichman
Valery Batsevich
Eugene Kobyliansky
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, Recanati School for Community Health Professions, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2013 Sep-Oct;25(5):617-21
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry - methods
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fingers - anatomy & histology - radiography
Humans
Male
Menarche
Menopause
Metacarpal Bones - anatomy & histology - radiography
Middle Aged
Reproduction
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Young Adult
Abstract
to evaluate the association between 2D:4D finger length ratios (representing the prenatal environment, i.e., early androgen exposure) and reproductive indices, such as age at menarche, menopausal age, and length of reproductive period.
Retrospective data on age at menarche and menopausal age as well as x-rays of both hands were obtained from 674 Chuvashian women aged 18-70 years (mean 46.32?±?15.42). Finger and metacarpal length ratios as well as visual classification of finger ratio types, were estimated from the x-rays.
We found that a low 2D:4D ratio (radiologically evaluated), a masculine 2D:4D ratio type (visually evaluated), and a putative bioassay for prenatal androgen exposure, were associated with a later menarche and a shorter reproductive period. No association was found with menopausal age.
PubMed ID
23907730 View in PubMed
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A 26 year physiological description of a National Hockey League team.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156070
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2008 Aug;33(4):753-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
H A Quinney
Randy Dewart
Alex Game
Gary Snydmiller
Darren Warburton
Gordon Bell
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2008 Aug;33(4):753-60
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry - methods
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weights and Measures - methods - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Hand Strength - physiology
Hockey - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Endurance - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Skinfold thickness
Time
Young Adult
Abstract
The primary purpose of this investigation was to examine the physiological profile of a National Hockey League (NHL) team over a period of 26 years. All measurements were made at a similar time of year (pre-season) in 703 male (mean age +/- SD = 24 +/- 4 y) hockey players. The data were analyzed across years, between positions (defensemen, forwards, and goaltenders), and between what were deemed successful and non-successful years using a combination of points acquired during the season and play-off success. Most anthropometric (height, mass, and BMI) and physiological parameters (absolute and relative VO2 peak, relative peak 5 s power output, abdominal endurance, and combined grip strength) showed a gradual increase over the 26 year period. Defensemen were taller and heavier, had higher absolute VO2 peak, and had greater combined grip strength than forwards and goaltenders. Forwards were younger and had higher values for relative VO2 peak. Goaltenders were shorter, had less body mass, a higher sum of skinfolds, lower VO2 peak, and better flexibility. The overall pre-season fitness profile was not related to team success. In conclusion, this study revealed that the fitness profile for a professional NHL ice-hockey team exhibited increases in player size and anaerobic and aerobic fitness parameters over a 26 year period that differed by position. However, this evolution of physiological profile did not necessarily translate into team success in this particular NHL franchise.
PubMed ID
18641719 View in PubMed
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Acoustic rhinometry in epidemiological studies--nasal reactions in Swedish schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195583
Source
Rhinol Suppl. 2000 Dec;16:59-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
R. Wålinder
D. Norbäck
G. Wieslander
G. Smedje
C. Erwall
P. Venge
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences/Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of Uppsala, Sweden. robert.walinder@medsci.uu.se
Source
Rhinol Suppl. 2000 Dec;16:59-64
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustics
Air pollution, indoor
Anthropometry - methods
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nasal Cavity - pathology
Nasal Obstruction - epidemiology - pathology
Schools
Sweden
Abstract
A cross-sectional study was performed on the relationships between hygienic measurements and nasal investigations in 234 personnel in 12 primary schools in mid-Sweden. Hygienic data included building characteristics, measurements of indoor air pollutants, air change rate, temperature and humidity. Clinical examinations included symptom reports, acoustic rhinometry and nasal lavage, with the determination of biomarker levels for eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), lysozyme, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and albumin. Subjective nasal obstruction was increased in schools with mechanical ventilation (adjusted prevalence OR = 2.0; 95 CI 1.1-3.7) and subjects reporting nasal obstruction had higher levels of dust in the classroom, compared to those not reporting this symptom (p = 0.008 by Mann-Whitney U-test). Congruently, a decreased nasal patency measured by acoustic rhinometric minimum cross-sectional areas (MCA1 and MCA2) was related to the use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.008 and p = 0.02 respectively, by Mann-Whitney U-test), dust levels (p = 0.03 and p
PubMed ID
11225291 View in PubMed
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[Age, sex and local characteristics of subcutaneous fat deposition in the shoulder and forearm according to rentgenological and anatomical data].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253105
Source
Arkh Anat Gistol Embriol. 1974 Oct;67(10):5-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1974

Air displacement plethysmography for fat-mass measurement in healthy young women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133936
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2011;72(2):85-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Heather L Edwards
Janis A Randall Simpson
Andrea C Buchholz
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2011;72(2):85-7
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology
Adult
Anthropometry - methods
Body Fat Distribution
Canada
Female
Humans
Plethysmography, Whole Body
Young Adult
Abstract
Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and air displacement plethysmography (ADP) are commonly used to assess body composition. Accurate body fat measures are valuable in a variety of populations. Because DXA, the reference standard, is expensive and labour-intensive, determining whether these two methods are interchangeable is important.
Forty-five female undergraduate students aged 21 to 33 with body mass indexes of 18.3 to 28.6 kg/m² were recruited from the University of Guelph. Each participant underwent one full-body DXA scan and one ADP assessment, to determine total percent fat mass (%FM).
The Pearson's correlation between %FM(DXA) (27.1 ± 4.8) and %FM(ADP) (26.1 ± 5.5) indicated good association (r=0.88, p
PubMed ID
21645430 View in PubMed
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Analysis of an early hominid ulna from the Omo Basin, Ethiopia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251291
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1976 Mar;44(2):295-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1976
Author
H M McHenry
S. Corruccini
F C Howell
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1976 Mar;44(2):295-304
Date
Mar-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Continental Ancestry Group
Animals
Anthropometry - methods
Ethiopia
Female
Fossils
Haplorhini - anatomy & histology
Hominidae - anatomy & histology
Humans
Inuits
Male
Primates - anatomy & histology
Ulna - anatomy & histology
Abstract
The discovery (in 1971) of a nearly complete right ulna from the Shungura Formation of the Omo basin provides the opportunity to abalyze the forelimb structure of the Australopithecus boisei form of early hominid. Results from multivariate morphometric analyses show that this bone is unique in shape among the extant hominoids although it is most similar to Pan and Homo. Despite its long slender shaft and large distal articular surface the bone's overall morphology is quite unlike Pongo.
PubMed ID
816207 View in PubMed
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Analysis of quantitative methods for rib seriation using the Spitalfields documented skeletal collection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177778
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2005 Jun;127(2):210-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Sonya K Owers
Robert F Pastor
Author Affiliation
Department of Archaeological Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford, West Yorkshire BD7 1DP, UK.
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 2005 Jun;127(2):210-8
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Anthropometry - methods
Female
Forensic Anthropology - methods
Humans
Male
Ontario
Ribs - anatomy & histology
Sex Characteristics
Abstract
Accurate rib seriation is essential in forensic anthropology and bioarchaeology for determination of minimum numbers of individuals, sequencing trauma patterns to the chest, and identification of central ribs for use in age estimation. We investigate quantitative methods for rib seriation based on three metric variables: superior (anterior) costo-transverse crest height (SCTCH), articular facet of the tubercle-to-angle length (AFTAL), and head-to-articular facet length (HAFL). The sample consists of complete but unseriated sets of ribs from 133 individuals from the documented (known age and sex) and undocumented skeletal collections of Christ Church Spitalfields, London. This research confirms the results of an earlier study (Hoppa and Saunders [1998] J. Forensic. Sci. 43:174-177) and extends it with the application of two new metric traits and further analyses of sex differences. Analyses of variance showed that SCTCH and AFTAL are significantly associated (P
PubMed ID
15503341 View in PubMed
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Anthropometric measurements in Canadian children: a scoping review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106379
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 Sep-Oct;104(5):e369-74
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ian T Patton
Amy C McPherson
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto. ian.patton@utoronto.ca.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 Sep-Oct;104(5):e369-74
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry - methods
Body mass index
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Abstract
The objective of the current study was to identify what forms of anthropometric measurement are currently being utilized with Canadian children and youth and what are the gaps in the literature on this topic.
The current study utilized a scoping review methodology in order to achieve the study objectives. Online databases Medline and PubMed and CINAHL were used to search articles from the last decade (2002-2012) that addressed Canadian children aged 2-18 years.
50 studies were included in this review. A variety of anthropometric measurements were identified, including body mass index, waist circumference, hip-to-waist ratio, among others. Six of the included studies (12%) utilized nationally representative data from large-scale studies. BMI was the most reported form of measurement with 88% of studies collecting it. Waist circumference was a distant second with 20% of studies reporting it. Several gaps in the literature exist with regards to First Nations (FN) research; many of the measurement methods were not used. Additionally, FN accounted for only 2.5% of the study's sample. The majority of studies took place in Quebec (29%) and Ontario (27%).
Body mass index is the most reported method of anthropometric measurement used for children. Efforts should be taken by health care practitioners and researchers to collect other forms of measurement in order to assist in understanding the validity of other measures and their value when used with children. Furthermore, attention needs to be focused on utilizing and studying various forms of anthropometric measurement across all Canadian regions and populations.
PubMed ID
24183177 View in PubMed
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Anthropometric measures as fitness indicators in primary school children: The Health Oriented Pedagogical Project (HOPP).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291818
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 May; 46(21_suppl):48-53
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2018
Author
Asgeir Mamen
Per Morten Fredriksen
Author Affiliation
Kristiania University College, Department of Health Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 May; 46(21_suppl):48-53
Date
May-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Anthropometry - methods
Body mass index
Child
Feasibility Studies
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Physical Fitness
Schools
Waist Circumference
Waist-Height Ratio
Abstract
As children's fitness continues to decline, frequent and systematic monitoring of fitness is important. Easy-to-use and low-cost methods with acceptable accuracy are essential in screening situations. This study aimed to investigate how the measurements of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) relate to selected measurements of fitness in children.
A total of 1731 children from grades 1 to 6 were selected who had a complete set of height, body mass, running performance, handgrip strength and muscle mass measurements. A composite fitness score was established from the sum of sex- and age-specific z-scores for the variables running performance, handgrip strength and muscle mass. This fitness z-score was compared to z-scores and quartiles of BMI, WC and WHtR using analysis of variance, linear regression and receiver operator characteristic analysis.
The regression analysis showed that z-scores for BMI, WC and WHtR all were linearly related to the composite fitness score, with WHtR having the highest R2 at 0.80. The correct classification of fit and unfit was relatively high for all three measurements. WHtR had the best prediction of fitness of the three with an area under the curve of 0.92 ( p
PubMed ID
29754574 View in PubMed
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Anthropometric reference data for elderly Swedes and its disease-related pattern.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273238
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 Sep;69(9):1066-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
N N Gavriilidou
M. Pihlsgård
S. Elmståhl
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 Sep;69(9):1066-75
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Anthropometry - methods
Body Composition
Body mass index
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - epidemiology
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Reference Values
Sex Distribution
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Anthropometric measurement is a noninvasive and cost-efficient method for nutritional assessment. The study aims to present age- and gender-specific anthropometric reference data for Swedish elderly in relation to common medical conditions, and also formulate prediction equations for such anthropometric measurements.
A cross-sectional study among random heterogeneous sample of 3360 subjects, aged 60-99 years, from a population study 'Good Aging in Scania. Means (±s.d.) and percentiles for height, weight, waist-, hip-, arm-, calf circumferences, triceps- (TST) and subscapular skinfold thickness (SST), body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio (WHR) and arm muscle circumference (AMC) were presented. The values were estimated based on the prevalence of myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac failure (CHF), stroke, cognitive impairment, dementia and dependence in daily living activities (ADL). Linear regression analysis was used to formulate the prediction equations.
Mean BMI was 27.5±5.8?kg/m(2) (men) and 27.2±8.1?kg/m(2) (women). WHR was higher among men (Men: 0.98±0.3, women: 0.87±0.2), except at age 85+ (women: 0.91±0.6). TST was 6.7±0.4?mm higher among women. Men with MI had BMI: 28.6±4.8?kg/m(2) and SST: 21±9.2?mm, whereas subjects with dementia had lower weight (by 9.5±2.9?kg) compared with the non-demented. ADL-dependent women had BMI= 29.0±3.9?kg/m(2), TST=19.2±1.3?mm.
New normative data on gender- and age-specific anthropometrics on the general elderly population are presented. Cardiovascular diseases are associated with subcutaneous and central adiposity opposed to fat loss with dementia. ADL dependence indicates inadequate physical activity. The prediction models could be used as possible indicators monitoring physical activity and adiposity among the general elderly population hence potential health indicators in health promotion.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25990690 View in PubMed
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106 records – page 1 of 11.