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21 records – page 1 of 3.

Architecture as animate landscape: circular shrines in the ancient Maya lowlands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123816
Source
Am Anthropol. 2012;114(1):64-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Eleanor Harrison-Buck
Author Affiliation
University of New Hampshire, Durham.
Source
Am Anthropol. 2012;114(1):64-80
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural - education - history
Archaeology - education - history
Architecture as Topic - education - history
Environment
History, Ancient
Housing - history
Humans
Indians, Central American - ethnology - history
Indians, North American - ethnology - history
Abstract
In this study, I develop a theory of landscape archaeology that incorporates the concept of “animism” as a cognitive approach. Current trends in anthropology are placing greater emphasis on indigenous perspectives, and in recent decades animism has seen a resurgence in anthropological theory. As a means of relating in (not to) one's world, animism is a mode of thought that has direct bearing on landscape archaeology. Yet, Americanist archaeologists have been slow to incorporate this concept as a component of landscape theory. I consider animism and Nurit Bird-David's (1999) theory of “relatedness” and how such perspectives might be expressed archaeologically in Mesoamerica. I examine the distribution of marine shells and cave formations that appear incorporated as architectural elements on ancient Maya circular shrine architecture. More than just “symbols” of sacred geography, I suggest these materials represent living entities that animate shrines through their ongoing relationships with human and other-than-human agents in the world.
PubMed ID
22662354 View in PubMed
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Changing subsistence practices at the Dorset Paleoeskimo site of Phillip's Garden, Newfoundland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187202
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(1):106-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Lisa M Hodgetts
M A P Renouf
Maribeth S Murray
Darlene McCuaig-Balkwill
Lesley Howse
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(1):106-20
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anthropology, Cultural - education - history
Arctic regions - ethnology
Climate Change - history
Diet - economics - ethnology - history
Fisheries - history
Food Supply - history
Gardening - education - history
History, 15th Century
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Humans
Newfoundland and Labrador - ethnology
Plants
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history
Seals, Earless
Abstract
A comparison of identified faunal assemblages from the Dorset site of Phillip's Garden indicates that harp seal hunting was the main focus of activity throughout the site's occupation. Despite the highly specialized nature of site use, it appears that reliance on harp seal decreased over time while fish and birds became increasingly important. These changes may reflect longer seasonal occupations at the site in later centuries, and/or a decrease in the local availability of harp seal. The observed shift coincides with the onset of a local climatic warming trend, which might have affected harp seal movements in the area. Dorset subsistence and settlement patterns in Newfoundland are still poorly understood due to a lack of preserved faunal assemblages in the region. The temporal trend illustrated here indicates that we cannot assume that these patterns were static throughout the Dorset occupation of the island.
PubMed ID
21755642 View in PubMed
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Cugtun Alngautat: the history and development of a picture text among the Nuniwarmiut Eskimo, Nunivak Island, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146398
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):32-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Dennis G Griffin
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):32-41
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Anthropology, Cultural - education - history
Archaeology - education - history
Folklore
History, 20th Century
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Inuits - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Language - history
Narration - history
Writing - history
Abstract
Native Americans have long relied on the oral transmission of their ideas rather than developing an alphabet and a reliance on written records. While the use of pictures to communicate basic concepts is found throughout Alaska during the historic contact period, the development of an alphabet or pictorial text among Natives in Alaska is extremely limited with examples found only in the Kuskokwim Delta (ca. 1901) and Seward Peninsula (ca. 1914). The later appearance of a pictorial text on Nunivak Island (ca. 1940) is believed to have derived from the Seward Peninsula style. Each of these texts is believed to have originated from the influence of missionaries. This paper traces the appearance and development of a picture text among the Nuniwarmiut Eskimo on Nunivak Island and its current status in the Mekoryuk community.
PubMed ID
21495281 View in PubMed
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Cultural remains in local and regional context on the central Alaska Peninsula: housepits, language, and cultural affinities at Marraatuq after 1000 B.P.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101947
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):97-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Patricia L McClenahan
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):97-103
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Anthropology, Cultural - education - history
Archaeology - education - history
Continental Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Family - ethnology - history - psychology
Family Health - ethnology
History, 15th Century
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Housing - history
Humans
Language - history
Residence Characteristics - history
Abstract
Professor Dumond's research on the Alaska Peninsula provided information that prior to 1,000 years ago people of both sides of the Alaska Peninsula shared material culture and exhibited subsistence interests that persisted into historic times, During the Late Precontact Era (ca. 1100 A.D. to mid-1700s) these Alutiiq societies shared cultural traits including language, house styles, and material culture with their relatives and neighbors on Kodiak Island. Until recently, few data were available regarding potential variability in house construction techniques, or styles and functions of Alutiiq semi-subterranean houses of this era found on the Alaska Peninsula, This paper provides examples of a few known prehistoric and historic Alaska Peninsula and Kodiak Alutiiq houses and presents previously unreported data from archaeological tests at Marraatuq on the Central Alaska Peninsula, Taken together with Dumond's 1998-1999 field work at Leader Creek and archaeological research on Kodiak Island, the work provides further evidence that interregional interaction was strong during the Late Precontact Era. However, large population centers and ranked political hierarchies probably were not hallmarks of central Alaska Peninsula communities during the Late Precontact Era and historic times as they were on the Kodiak and Aleutian islands.
PubMed ID
21495284 View in PubMed
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The distribution of alcohol among the natives of Russian America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101948
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):69-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Andrei V Grinëv
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):69-79
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - history - psychology
Alcoholic Beverages - history
Alcoholic Intoxication - ethnology - history
Alcoholism - ethnology - history
Anthropology, Cultural - education - history
Colonialism - history
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Public Health - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Russia - ethnology
Abstract
The study of archival materials and published historical and ethnographic sources shows that alcohol played an insignificant role in contacts with the aboriginal population during the Russian colonization of Alaska. The Russian-American Company (RAC) tried to fight alcoholism and limited access of spirits to the natives of the Russian colonies partially for moral and partially for economic reasons. The only Alaskan natives to whom agents of the RAC supplied rum in large quantities were the Tlingit and Kaigani Haida in 1830–1842, and among them excessive drinking became a widespread problem. The chief suppliers of alcohol for these Native Americans were the British and American traders at the end of the eighteenth century. In the mid-nineteenth century traders and whalers began to supply it to the Bering Sea Eskimos as well. Russian colonization was marked by efforts to limit drunkenness in the native populations. In that sense, Russian colonization was favorable in comparison with subsequent American colonization of Alaska.
PubMed ID
21495282 View in PubMed
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Diving down: ritual healing in the tale of The Blind Man and the Loon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187196
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):49-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Craig Mishler
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2003;40(2):49-55
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural - education - history
Arctic regions - ethnology
Faith Healing - education - history
Folklore
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Medicine, Traditional - history
Mental Healing - history - psychology
Narration - history
North America - ethnology
Population Groups - education - ethnology - history
Abstract
Some stories enjoy a very widespread distribution in the North. Anthropologists and folklorists have long collected and analyzed these stories, and scrutinized their regional variants. Craig Mishler taps into this longstanding scholarly tradition as he looks at the widespread story of “The Blind Man and the Loon.” However, he goes beyond analyzing the form of this tale to explore what gives it healing properties. He wants to know why this story has become part of virtually every Native storyteller’s repertoire throughout the Arctic and Subarctic. One answer is that the main character and events of the story evoke the undeserved suffering that shapes the human condition everywhere. Much of the story’s power stems from its depiction of a ritual for healing the handicapped, thereby becoming a medicinal oral text. Additional power comes from the wide range of local and regional forms that adapt it to local sensibilities.
PubMed ID
21774143 View in PubMed
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The economics of sheep and goat husbandry in Norse Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176798
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2005;42(1):103-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Ingrid Mainland
Paul Halstead
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2005;42(1):103-20
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry - economics - education - history
Animals
Anthropology, Cultural - education - history
Arctic regions - ethnology
Dairy Products - history
Diet - ethnology - history
Economics - history
Food Supply - economics - history
Goats
Greenland - ethnology
History, Medieval
Humans
Meat Products - history
Population Groups - ethnology - history
Sheep
Abstract
Insight into the relative importance of sheep and goat herding and of the economic significance of each species (i.e., milk vs. meat vs. wool) in Medieval Greenland is obtained through the application of Halstead et al.'s (2002) criteria for the identification of adult ovicaprine mandibles to faunal assemblages from three Norse farmsteads: Sandnes, V52a, and Ø71S. The economic strategies identified are broadly comparable between the two species and the Eastern and Western Settlement sites examined, and are suggestive of the subsistence production of meat and milk. Comparison with farmsteads elsewhere in Greenland indicates that socio-economic status and/or farmstead size interacted with geographical location in determining the economic strategies employed by the Norse farmers. A broader use of resources and a more varied diet are evident at larger farmsteads in Greenland and this paper suggests that such sites would have been better able than their smaller counterparts to withstand environmental deterioration during the early Middle Ages. These analyses have also confirmed that goats were relatively more common in Norse sites in Greenland than in Norse sites in Iceland, Orkney, or Shetland.
PubMed ID
21774148 View in PubMed
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The end of the Kachemak tradition on the Kenai Peninsula, southcentral Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146397
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):90-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
William B Workman
Karen Wood Workman
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):90-6
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Anthropology, Cultural - education - history
Continental Population Groups - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Diet - ethnology - history
Extinction, Biological
Food - history
History, 15th Century
History, 16th Century
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Humans
Inuits - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Mortality - ethnology - history
Population Dynamics - history
Social Change - history
Social Conditions - history
Abstract
The Kachemak tradition was established by ca. 3000 B.P. in Kachemak Bay. Probably somewhat later a variant termed Riverine Kachemak, with a population adapted to salmon and terrestrial resources, appeared on the northern Kenai Peninsula. The Kachemak tradition people seem to have abandoned Kachemak Bay by ca. 1400 B.P. Seven of 12 available Kachemak tradition dates predate 1400 B.P. even at two sigma. Scattered younger dates are thus suspect outliers. The end of Riverine Kachemak tradition has been placed at ca. 1000 B.P., at which time the population was supposedly replaced by in-migrating groups ancestral to the Dena'ina Athapaskans. Close examination of the numerous available radiocarbon dates shows that most Riverine Kachemak dates cluster in the early centuries of the First Millennium A.D. and most Dena'ina dates substantially postdate 1000 A.D. Probably the Riverine Kachemak and Dena'ina peoples never met on the Kenai River. However, the correspondence in date ranges between Kachemak Bay and Riverine Kachemak is striking, suggesting their fates were linked. Both traditions collapsed by 1400-1500 B.P. The causes are probably multiple but do not include cultural replacement.
PubMed ID
21495283 View in PubMed
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Holocene radiocarbon-dated sites in northeastern Siberia: issues of temporal frequency, reservoir age, and human-nature interaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101946
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):104-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Yaroslav V Kuzmin
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2010;47(2):104-15
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural - education - history
Civilization - history
Climate Change - history
Food Supply - history
History, Ancient
History, Medieval
Housing - history
Humans
Oceans and Seas - ethnology
Population Dynamics - history
Radiometric Dating - history
Residence Characteristics - history
Siberia - ethnology
Abstract
The existing corpus of data on radiocarbon dates for Holocene sites in Northeastern Siberia was used as proxy to reconstruct the chronology of human occupation of the region. The problem of reservoir age correction in the Bering Sea region complicated this task and this issue needs to be solved in order to obtain more reliable age determinations for coastal archaeological sites. Using a chronology built after excluding the questionable dates from the database, the major patterns of human population dynamics and their possible correlation with climatic fluctuations were examined. No direct relationship appears to exist between these two processes. Additional archaeological and paleo environmental work needs to be carried out in this region of the North.
PubMed ID
21495285 View in PubMed
Less detail

21 records – page 1 of 3.