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Aboriginal women caregivers of the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160837
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2007 Oct-Dec;7(4):796
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kay E Crosato
Catherine Ward-Griffin
Beverly Leipert
Author Affiliation
The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. Kay.Crosato@halton.ca
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2007 Oct-Dec;7(4):796
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthropology, Cultural - methods
Caregivers
Community-Institutional Relations
Culture
Empathy
Female
Geriatric Nursing
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Middle Aged
Ontario
Qualitative Research
Rural Population
Social Values
Abstract
The purpose of this qualitative study was to develop a comprehensive understanding of Aboriginal women's experiences and perceptions of providing care to the elderly in geographically isolated communities (GIC). Research with Aboriginal women caregivers is essential as the population of Aboriginal elders is increasing, and Aboriginal women represent the majority of caregivers in their communities.
This study was guided by focused ethnography, which seeks an understanding of a sub-group within a cultural group by uncovering the less obvious expressions and behaviours of the sub-group members. Using one-on-one open-ended interviews and participant observation, 13 women from a number of Aboriginal communities in northern and southern Ontario participated in this study. Data analysis was conducted by reviewing transcripts of interviews to identify codes and themes.
Study findings revealed that four concentric circles represent the caring experiences of the Aboriginal women participants: the healers, the family, the Aboriginal community, and the non-Aboriginal community. Cultural values greatly informed participants' perceptions about caring for elderly persons in GIC. These values are represented in five themes: passing on traditions, being chosen to care, supporting the circle of healers, (re)establishing the circles of care, and accepting/refusing external resources.
The findings from this study have significant implications for healthcare practice and future research.
PubMed ID
17935459 View in PubMed
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Access to primary care from the perspective of Aboriginal patients at an urban emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139323
Source
Qual Health Res. 2011 Mar;21(3):333-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Annette J Browne
Victoria L Smye
Patricia Rodney
Sannie Y Tang
Bill Mussell
John O'Neil
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. annette.browne@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Qual Health Res. 2011 Mar;21(3):333-48
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
British Columbia
Canada
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Triage
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
In this article, we discuss findings from an ethnographic study in which we explored experiences of access to primary care services from the perspective of Aboriginal people seeking care at an emergency department (ED) located in a large Canadian city. Data were collected over 20 months of immersion in the ED, and included participant observation and in-depth interviews with 44 patients triaged as stable and nonurgent, most of whom were living in poverty and residing in the inner city. Three themes in the findings are discussed: (a) anticipating providers' assumptions; (b) seeking help for chronic pain; and (c) use of the ED as a reflection of social suffering. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to the role of the ED as well as the broader primary care sector in responding to the needs of patients affected by poverty, racialization, and other forms of disadvantage.
PubMed ID
21075979 View in PubMed
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Accountability of anthropologists, indigenous healers and their governments: a plea for reasonable medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233938
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1988;27(12):1461-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988

Achieving equilibrium within a culture of stability? Cultural knowing in nursing care on psychiatric intensive care units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136673
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2011;32(4):255-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Martin Salzmann-Erikson
Kim L Tz N
Ann-Britt Ivarsson
Henrik Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Dalarna University School of Health and Sciences, Falun, Sweden; Orebro University, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Orebro, Sweden. mse@du.se
Source
Issues Ment Health Nurs. 2011;32(4):255-65
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Clinical Nursing Research
Crisis Intervention
Culture
Emergency Services, Psychiatric
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interview, Psychological
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing, Team
Psychiatric Nursing
Psychotic Disorders - ethnology - nursing
Research Design
Security Measures
Social Environment
Social Values
Sweden
Therapeutic Community
Abstract
This article presents intensive psychiatric nurses' work and nursing care. The aim of the study was to describe expressions of cultural knowing in nursing care in psychiatric intensive care units (PICU). Spradley's ethnographic methodology was applied. Six themes emerged as frames for nursing care in psychiatric intensive care: providing surveillance, soothing, being present, trading information, maintaining security and reducing. These themes are used to strike a balance between turbulence and stability and to achieve equilibrium. As the nursing care intervenes when turbulence emerges, the PICU becomes a sanctuary that offers tranquility, peace and rest.
PubMed ID
21355761 View in PubMed
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Advancing beyond the system: telemedicine nurses' clinical reasoning using a computerised decision support system for patients with COPD - an ethnographic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294693
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2017 12 28; 17(1):181
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-28-2017
Author
Tina Lien Barken
Elin Thygesen
Ulrika Söderhamn
Author Affiliation
Centre for eHealth, Centre for Care Research, Southern Norway, Department of Health and Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Post box 422, 4604, Kristiansand, Norway. tina.l.barken@uia.no.
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2017 12 28; 17(1):181
Date
12-28-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
Clinical Decision-Making - methods
Decision Support Systems, Clinical
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Nursing - methods
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - therapy
Qualitative Research
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
Telemedicine is changing traditional nursing care, and entails nurses performing advanced and complex care within a new clinical environment, and monitoring patients at a distance. Telemedicine practice requires complex disease management, advocating that the nurses' reasoning and decision-making processes are supported. Computerised decision support systems are being used increasingly to assist reasoning and decision-making in different situations. However, little research has focused on the clinical reasoning of nurses using a computerised decision support system in a telemedicine setting. Therefore, the objective of the study is to explore the process of telemedicine nurses' clinical reasoning when using a computerised decision support system for the management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The factors influencing the reasoning and decision-making processes were investigated.
In this ethnographic study, a combination of data collection methods, including participatory observations, the think-aloud technique, and a focus group interview was employed. Collected data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.
When telemedicine nurses used a computerised decision support system for the management of patients with complex, unstable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, two categories emerged: "the process of telemedicine nurses' reasoning to assess health change" and "the influence of the telemedicine setting on nurses' reasoning and decision-making processes". An overall theme, termed "advancing beyond the system", represented the connection between the reasoning processes and the telemedicine work and setting, where being familiar with the patient functioned as a foundation for the nurses' clinical reasoning process.
In the telemedicine setting, when supported by a computerised decision support system, nurses' reasoning was enabled by the continuous flow of digital clinical data, regular video-mediated contact and shared decision-making with the patient. These factors fostered an in-depth knowledge of the patients and acted as a foundation for the nurses' reasoning process. Nurses' reasoning frequently advanced beyond the computerised decision support system recommendations. Future studies are warranted to develop more accurate algorithms, increase system maturity, and improve the integration of the digital clinical information with clinical experiences, to support telemedicine nurses' reasoning process.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29282068 View in PubMed
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After Beslan: childhood, complexity and risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155265
Source
Br J Sociol. 2008 Sep;59(3):501-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Chris Jenks
John A Smith
Author Affiliation
Vice-Chancellor's Office, Brunel University. chris.jenks@brunel.ac.uk
Source
Br J Sociol. 2008 Sep;59(3):501-18
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
Child
Ecology
Humans
Islam
Prisoners - psychology
Risk
Russia
Schools
Social Behavior
Terrorism - psychology
Abstract
This paper addresses the events at Beslan as a crisis point at which the postmodern celebration of difference spills into unbearable chaos. However this chaos turns out to show specific, dynamic or complex, self-organizing structures. Such dynamics, instead of obeying 'normal' ranges exhibit widely different scales of magnitude and intensity. Central to these interactions is the formation, however loose or opportunistic, of identities that also produce others: the formation of micro-ethnicities that state how the 'other' or out-group can be treated, mistreated or 'deconstructed'. At Beslan, this reaches a point of crisis which is both localized and universally challenging: it poses the problem of intolerability to a notion of democratic community and an epistemology premised on, and promising, pluralistic tolerance. The outcome is a realignment of sociology and the sociology of childhood along the axes of a model of human ecology.
PubMed ID
18782152 View in PubMed
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Alexander F. Chamberlain: a life's work.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163175
Source
Integr Physiol Behav Sci. 2005 Oct-Dec;40(4):205-17
Publication Type
Article
Author
Julia M Berkman
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA.
Source
Integr Physiol Behav Sci. 2005 Oct-Dec;40(4):205-17
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural - history
Canada
Child
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Folklore
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Indians, North American - history
United States
Abstract
This article examines the life and work of Alexander Francis Chamberlain. Though he has received little attention since the early 1900s, the importance of this scholar should not be underestimated. Chamberlain made notable contributions to the body of knowledge in anthropology-a discipline that, at the time, was a combination of anthropological and psychological inquiry. His early work began with investigations into the cultures and languages of two Indian tribes indigenous to Canada and the northern United States and, within a few decades, positioned Chamberlain as the leading scholar in this domain. Beyond his ethnographic insights, Chamberlain queried the development of the child and wrote on the subject of childhood in world folklore. He concerned himself with a scope of worthwhile subjects ranging from linguistics to women's suffrage. No topic was out of range as all forms of human study addressed the need for seeing each group as a contributing force to humanity at large. Chamberlain emphasized that no single racial, ethnic, or religious group should be singled out as inherently superior to another, a belief far ahead of his time. This article is an attempt at drawing a picture of a man whose scholarly achievements and strength of character are captured in the depth and breadth of his writing.
PubMed ID
17549937 View in PubMed
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An activity-theoretical method for studying user participation in IS design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183365
Source
Methods Inf Med. 2003;42(4):398-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
S. Hyysalo
J. Lehenkari
Author Affiliation
Center for Activity Theory and Developmental Work Research, Department of Education, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 47 FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. sampsa.hyysalo@helsinki.fi
Source
Methods Inf Med. 2003;42(4):398-404
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Consumer Participation
Databases as Topic - organization & administration
Diabetes Mellitus - therapy
Disease Management
Finland
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Models, Theoretical
Software Design
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
This paper aims to present an activity-theoretical method for studying the effects of user participation in IS development.
This method is developed through a case study of the process of designing a diabetes database.
The method consists of a historical analysis of the design process, an ethnographical study of the use of the database, and researcher-driven interventions into the on-going user-producer interaction. In the historical analysis, we study particularly which user groups of the database have influenced the design work and which perspectives need to be incorporated into the design in the near future. An analytical model consisting of perspectives on local design, particular technology, and societal domain is introduced as a conceptual tool for this analysis. We also introduce the possibility of employing the historical analysis in guiding an ethnographical study of the user sites and researcher-driven interventions, which provide the participants with tools for improving their design process.
PubMed ID
14534640 View in PubMed
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Analyzing participant produced photographs from an ethnographic study of fatherhood and smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159100
Source
Res Nurs Health. 2008 Oct;31(5):529-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
J L Oliffe
J L Bottorff
M. Kelly
M. Halpin
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Res Nurs Health. 2008 Oct;31(5):529-39
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude to Health
British Columbia
Data Collection - methods
Fathers - psychology
Freedom
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Knowledge
Male
Narration
Nursing Methodology Research
Paternal Behavior
Philosophy, Nursing
Photography - methods
Postmodernism
Power (Psychology)
Psychological Theory
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Research Design
Smoking - psychology
Software
Abstract
As part of an ongoing ethnographic study, we examined the photographs and narratives that new fathers produced to ascertain how they created social, psychological, and relational space for continued smoking. A four-part process for analyzing the photographs consisting of preview, review, cross-photo comparison, and theorizing revealed how visual data analyses can be used to develop insights into men's health behaviors and beliefs. There is ongoing epistemological debate and methodological uncertainty about how photographic data should be treated in health sciences research. By conducting formal layered analyses, researchers can expand and extend both what is said about, and interpreted through, photographs.
PubMed ID
18228606 View in PubMed
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An anthropological perspective on the evolution and lateralization of the brain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60775
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1977 Sep 30;299:424-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1977
Author
J L Dawson
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1977 Sep 30;299:424-47
Date
Sep-30-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Anthropology, Cultural
Anthropology, Physical
Brain - physiology
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Dominance, Cerebral - physiology
Estrogens - blood
Evolution
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Laterality - physiology
Male
Perception - physiology
Phenotype
Rats
Speech - physiology
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to review the anthropological evidence relating to the cultural determinants of the right-hand first postaulted by Hertz in his classic study. Also a genetic/cultural conformity model of handedness is presented that postulates that the incidence of handedness in a society is held to result both from the genetic expression of handedness interacting with cultural pressures towards conformity. The evolutionary basis for the hemispheric functional organization into cognitive and perceptual hemispheric functions is discussed in terms of "right-handed dominant homozygotes, DD," "heterozygotes, DR," mixed-handers, and "left-handed recessive homozygotes, RR." The cross-cultural distribution of handedness provides support for this model since the more conforming agriculturalists as measured by the Asch Test have a significantly lower incidence of left-handedness (0.59%, 1.5% and 3.4%), while the more permissively socialized Eskimo and Arunta hunters, who are seen to be more independent on the Asch Test, have 11.3% and 10.5% left-handers, respectively. Also, due to the greater pressures for females to conform in agricultural societies, the incidence of female left-handedness in agricultural societies is 0% out of 330 female Ss, with 3.8%, 0.79%, and 2.5% in agricultural males, as contrasted with the Eskimo hunters who have 12.5% left-handed males and 10.3% left-handed females, showing no significant sex difference. A further Hong Kong-English study also supports the genetic/cultural conformity model with a significantly lower incidence of Hong Kong Chinese left-handers (RR: male = 2.7%, and female = 4.2%). The next section, concerned with the neonatal sex-hormone differentiation and lateralization processes, provides a neuropsychologic theory relating to spatial and linguistic skills that is relevant to the following section, which deals with relationships between laterality and cognitive style. The results are also presented for the Alaskan Eskimo in relation to hand, eye, auditory dominance and cognitive style. The analysis of Eskimo fixed-versus mixed-laterality data also confirms, as predicted, that both within and across a modality (e.g., right hand/right eye/right ear) fixed right-dominance Eskimo Ss are more field-independent than mixed-dominance Ss, while the fixed left-dominance Ss are the most field-dependent and have lower spatial skills. The discussion section reviews the papers relating to the genetic/conformity model of handedness, as well as laterality and cognitive style. The evolutionary adaptive significance of sex differences in gonadal differentiation and lateralization of the brain on spatial and linguistic skills are also reviewed. The conclusions are concerned with the implications for biosocial theory and the rapidly changing incidence of left-handedness due to accompanying changes in cultural pressures both within and across cultures.
PubMed ID
280219 View in PubMed
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307 records – page 1 of 31.