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Anthropological methods in ethnopharmacology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221488
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1993 Mar;38(2-3):93-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
N L Etkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu 96822.
Source
J Ethnopharmacol. 1993 Mar;38(2-3):93-104
Date
Mar-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Pharmacology
Abstract
This paper reviews anthropological methods in ethnopharmacology to advance a critical and biobehavioral perspective for the construction of primary data in the light of indigenous paradigms of health and therapeutics. The unique contributions of anthropology are the conceptual and practical tools that allow one to develop the ethnography of plant use in sufficient depth to correlate with laboratory and clinical investigations of plant constituents and activities. This serves an ethnopharmacology that links bioscientific research to traditional empirical knowledge. Specific methods discussed include: key respondents, participant observation, focus groups, structured and unstructured interviews, survey instruments and questionnaires, lexical and semantic studies, and discourse and content analysis. The accommodation of rapid ethnographic techniques for ethnopharmacologic research is described, and several problem orientations based on assessments of efficacy are offered.
PubMed ID
8510473 View in PubMed
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Gone the bull of winter? Grappling with the cultural implications of and anthropology's role(s) in global climate change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95437
Source
Curr Anthropol. 2008 Aug;49(4):569-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Crate Susan A
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Science and Policy at George Mason University, David King Hall, MS 5F2 4400, University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030-4400, USA. scrate1@gmu.edu
Source
Curr Anthropol. 2008 Aug;49(4):569-95
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Cold Climate
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Siberia
Abstract
Because global climate change is intimately linked to culture, anthropologists are strategically well-placed to interpret it, communicate information about it, and act in response to it both in the field and at home. Fieldworkers are increasingly encountering reports of the local effects of climate change from their research partners, and it is becoming apparent that indigenous peoples' recognized capacity for adaptation to change may not be sufficient to cope with these effects. Fieldwork among Viliui Sakha of northeastern Siberia suggests an action-oriented approach to anthropological climate change research that begins by developing cultural models of the local effects of global climate change, goes on to fill in the gaps with Western scientific knowledge, and ends with the dissemination of that information and its use for the development of adaptive strategies, policy recommendations, and advocacy.
PubMed ID
19230265 View in PubMed
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End of life in an Icelandic nursing home: an ethnographic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272411
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2011 Aug;17(8):405-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Anný Lára Emilsdóttir
Margrét Gústafsdóttir
Source
Int J Palliat Nurs. 2011 Aug;17(8):405-11
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Empathy
Humans
Iceland
Nursing Homes
Palliative Care
Abstract
To examine care of the dying elderly in a nursing home in Iceland.
An ethnographic study design was adopted. The study sample comprised all of the nursing home residents, their relatives, and all of the staff working in the nursing home, but with a particular focus on the 11 registered nurses (RNs) on the site. Data was collected through participant observation, semi-structured group interviews with the RNs, and an examination of the nursing home's official records. Underlying themes were discovered using interpretative phenomenology.
Two main themes emerged: that palliative care is the most important element of care in the home, and that RNs are the pillars of caring for the dying elderly in the nursing home.
The findings suggest that RNs' professional knowledge can greatly contribute to the care of dying elderly residents in nursing homes. There seem to be many parallels between the condition and wellbeing of very frail nursing home residents and patients in specialized palliative care units for the elderly. Public awareness of palliative care of the elderly in Icelandic nursing homes should be encouraged.
PubMed ID
22067681 View in PubMed
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The establishing of Chinese medical concepts in Norwegian acupuncture schools: the cultural translation of jingluo ('circulation tracts').

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138652
Source
Anthropol Med. 2010 Dec;17(3):315-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Gry Sagli
Author Affiliation
Section for Medical Anthropology and Medical History, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, NO-0318 Oslo, Norway. gry.sagli@medisin.uio.no
Source
Anthropol Med. 2010 Dec;17(3):315-26
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture - education
Acupuncture Therapy
Anthropology, Cultural
Cultural Competency
Humans
Meridians
Norway
Abstract
Acupuncture and other forms of so-called alternative treatments, originating outside the West, have increasingly become an integrated part of the repertoire of medical practices widely used in health care remote from their places of origin. The main aim of this paper is to elucidate the cultural translation of Chinese medical concepts in a Western, acupuncture setting located far from China. Drawing on material from ethnographic fieldwork in acupuncture schools in Norway, this study discusses how concepts used in Chinese acupuncture are taught and interpreted for biomedically oriented students. The paper concentrates on the concept of jingluo ('circulation tracts', 'meridians') which the schools considered to be vital in order to conduct acupuncture. Similar to several other Chinese medical concepts, jingluo presents claims about the body that significantly differ from biomedical assumptions. The paper adds novel resources and insights to the research concerning medical conceptions, in that it applies the perspective of 'finitism' as developed in the field of sociology of knowledge by Barnes, Bloor and Henry (1996) in its analysis. It presents an analysis of five empirical examples demonstrating how a variety of interpretations of jingluo--many of them from different fields and some of them contradictory--were involved in establishing jingluo. Finally, by examining examples of Chinese concepts of the body, the paper seeks to contribute to the wider field of the anthropology of the body as well as to add to our understanding of the ways in which medical pluralism and globalisation of acupuncture unfolds.
PubMed ID
21153965 View in PubMed
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The view from the Hogan: cultural epidemiology and the return to ethnography.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169453
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2006 Mar;43(1):72-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
James B Waldram
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. waldram@duke.usask.ca
Source
Transcult Psychiatry. 2006 Mar;43(1):72-85
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural - methods
Canada
Culture
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Abstract
Alexander Leighton's seminal work has clearly demonstrated how ethnographic experience provides the rich cultural context in which epidemiological data are best interpreted. This article reviews recent trends in cultural epidemiology, and especially the emergence of the EMIC (Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue) as a quantitatively oriented tool designed to assess culture. It is suggested that such efforts do not reflect more recent trends in culture theory, and tend to view 'cultures' as easily bounded and largely homogenous units to facilitate the generation of quantitative data. It is argued that cultural epidemiologists should take a step back and ask, 'what is the culture in question here?' and 'how do I know if it is appropriate to place any given member of my sample into a specific cultural category?' before proceeding with any 'culturally appropriate' instrument. The answer to these questions begins with a return to ethnography as a means to elucidate and describe culture within the context in which it is being presented and studied.
PubMed ID
16671393 View in PubMed
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Sources of practice knowledge among nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175786
Source
Qual Health Res. 2005 Apr;15(4):460-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Carole A Estabrooks
William Rutakumwa
Katherine A O'Leary
Joanne Profetto-McGrath
Margaret Milner
Merry Jo Levers
Shannon Scott-Findlay
Author Affiliation
Knowledge Utilization Studies Program, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2005 Apr;15(4):460-76
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Anthropology, Cultural
Humans
Knowledge
Nurses
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Abstract
Several studies have been published listing sources of practice knowledge used by nurses. However, the authors located no studies that asked clinicians to describe comprehensively and categorize the kinds of knowledge needed to practice or in which the researchers attempted to understand how clinicians privilege various knowledge sources. In this article, the authors report findings from two large ethnographic case studies in which sources of practice knowledge was a subsidiary theme. They draw on data from individual and card sort interviews, as well as participant observations, to identify nurses' sources of practice knowledge. Their findings demonstrate that nurses categorize their sources of practice knowledge into four broad groupings: social interactions, experiential knowledge, documents, and a priori knowledge. The insights gained add new understanding about sources of knowledge used by nurses and challenge the disproportionate weight that proponents of the evidence-based movement ascribe to research knowledge.
Notes
Comment In: Nurs Res. 2007 Jul-Aug;56(4 Suppl):S53-917625475
PubMed ID
15761093 View in PubMed
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How different can you be and still survive? Homogeneity and difference in clinical nursing education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169528
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2004;1:Article2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Barbara L Paterson
Margaret Osborne
David Gregory
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia. bpaterso@unb.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2004;1:Article2
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Canada
Cultural Diversity
Education, Nursing
Humans
Social Conditions
Students, Nursing
Abstract
The article focuses on a component of a three-year institutional ethnography regarding the construction of cultural diversity in clinical education. Students in two Canadian schools of nursing described being a nursing student as bounded by unwritten and largely invisible expectations of homogeneity in the context of a predominant discourse of equality and cultural sensitivity. At the same time, they witnessed many incidents, both personally and those directed toward other individuals of the same culture, of clinical teachers problematizing difference and centering on difference as less than the expected norm. This complex and often contradictory experience of difference and homogeneity contributed to their construction of cultural diversity as a problem. The authors provide examples of how the perception of being different affected some students' learning in the clinical setting and their interactions with clinical teachers. They will illustrate that this occurred in the context of macro influences that shaped how both teachers and students experienced and perceived cultural diversity. The article concludes with a challenge to nurse educators to deconstruct their beliefs and assumptions about inclusivity in nursing education.
PubMed ID
16646885 View in PubMed
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Canadian ethnographic study of sources and definitions of theological reflection in pastoral care and counseling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156544
Source
J Pastoral Care Counsel. 2008 Spring-Summer;62(1-2):113-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
Thomas St James O'Connor
Elizabeth Meakes
Author Affiliation
Waterloo Lutheran Seminary, Waterloo, ON., Canada N2L 3C5.
Source
J Pastoral Care Counsel. 2008 Spring-Summer;62(1-2):113-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Canada
Christianity
Counseling
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Pastoral Care
Theology
Abstract
What are the sources and definitions of theological reflection developed by Canadian practitioners of pastoral care and counseling? This study is part of a larger qualitative research project on theological reflection. This research reviews the literature, describes the ethnographic method, and presents the findings with a sample of 75. Main sources are sacred texts, personal experience, experiences of clients, and traditions of faith group. Definitions are meaning making, discovering the divine and discipleship with recommendations for future research listed.
PubMed ID
18572545 View in PubMed
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Medical anthropology and development: a theoretical perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245310
Source
Soc Sci Med Med Anthropol. 1980 Nov;14B(4):197-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980
Author
R. Frankenberg
Source
Soc Sci Med Med Anthropol. 1980 Nov;14B(4):197-207
Date
Nov-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Developing Countries
Humans
Medicine
Medicine, Traditional
Philosophy, Medical
Sociology, Medical
PubMed ID
7209591 View in PubMed
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Medical pluralism in world perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245311
Source
Soc Sci Med Med Anthropol. 1980 Nov;14B(4):191-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1980
Author
C. Leslie
Source
Soc Sci Med Med Anthropol. 1980 Nov;14B(4):191-5
Date
Nov-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Developing Countries
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Medicine, Traditional
Sociology, Medical
PubMed ID
7209590 View in PubMed
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307 records – page 1 of 31.