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Anatomical risk factors in primary angle-closure glaucoma. A ten year follow up survey based on limbal and axial anterior chamber depths in a high risk population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5400
Source
Int Ophthalmol. 1992 Sep;16(4-5):265-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992
Author
P H Alsbirk
Author Affiliation
Eye Department, Central Hospital, Hillerød, Denmark.
Source
Int Ophthalmol. 1992 Sep;16(4-5):265-72
Date
Sep-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anterior Chamber - pathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glaucoma, Angle-Closure - ethnology - pathology
Gonioscopy
Greenland - ethnology
Humans
Inuits
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
A population of 539 persons was examined in 1979, using LCD and ACD estimations acc. to van Herick et al. and by Haag Streit pachymetry, respectively. ACD had been measured already in 1969, due to a remarkable occurrence of primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) in the survey population of Greenland Eskimos (District of Uummannaq). The present follow up study in 1989 aimed at persons presently above age 40, who had shown either an LCD value graded as 0 (contact) or 1 (
PubMed ID
1428555 View in PubMed
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Anterior chamber depth and primary angle-closure glaucoma. I. An epidemiologic study in Greenland Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5464
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1975 Mar;53(1):89-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1975

Anterior chamber depth, intraocular lens position, and refractive outcomes after cataract surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116465
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2013 Apr;39(4):572-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Anna-Lotta Engren
Anders Behndig
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences/Ophthalmology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2013 Apr;39(4):572-7
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anterior Chamber - pathology
Biometry - methods
Diagnostic Techniques, Ophthalmological
Female
Humans
Interferometry - methods
Lens Implantation, Intraocular
Lenses, Intraocular
Light
Male
Middle Aged
Phacoemulsification
Photography - methods
Prospective Studies
Pseudophakia - physiopathology
Refraction, Ocular - physiology
Reproducibility of Results
Visual Acuity - physiology
Abstract
To assess postoperative intraocular lens (IOL) position in relation to the cornea and iris, compare 2 devices for anterior chamber depth (ACD) measurement, and assess the impact of these factors on postoperative refraction in phacoemulsification.
Department of Clinical Sciences/Ophthalmology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
Evaluation of diagnostic test or technology.
Biometry and measurement of the anterior segment were performed preoperatively and postoperatively with the partial coherence interferometry (PCI)-based IOLMaster and the Pentacam HR Scheimpflug device. Predicted refraction was calculated with ACD estimations according to the Haigis formula and was compared with the actual postoperative refraction. Changes in ACD and the distance between the cornea-iris and the iris-lens/IOL were assessed from Scheimpflug images. The theoretical refractive impact of differences in ACD was calculated.
The mean preoperative ACD and refractive prediction error, respectively, was 3.22 mm ± 0.37 (SD) and 0.41 ± 0.43 diopters (D) for the PCI device and 3.21 ± 0.35 mm and 0.41 ± 0.41 D for the Scheimpflug device; the difference was not statistically significant. The mean ACD, cornea-iris distance, and iris-lens/IOL distance changes were 1.62 ± 0.38 mm, 0.78 ± 0.29 mm, and 0.85 ± 0.27 mm, respectively. The mean predicted refractive outcome from a 1.0 mm difference in ACD was 0.32 D.
No difference was found between the measurement devices. Although the exact postoperative IOL position is difficult to predict, its impact on postoperative refraction was comparatively small compared with the impact of minor corneal curvature or axial length measurement errors.
PubMed ID
23395354 View in PubMed
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Calibration of axial length measurements with the Zeiss IOLMaster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29527
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2005 Jul;31(7):1345-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Thomas Olsen
Martin Thorwest
Author Affiliation
University Eye Clinic, Aarhus Kommunehospital, Aarhus, Denmark. tkolson@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2005 Jul;31(7):1345-50
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anterior Chamber - pathology - ultrasonography
Calibration
Child
Diagnostic Techniques, Ophthalmological
Eye - pathology - ultrasonography
Female
Humans
Interferometry - methods
Lasers - diagnostic use
Lens Implantation, Intraocular
Lenses, Intraocular
Male
Middle Aged
Optics
Preoperative Care
Pseudophakia - pathology - ultrasonography
Refraction, Ocular
Abstract
PURPOSE: To study the conditions for consistent axial length measurements with partial coherence interferometry (PCI) performed with the Zeiss IOLMaster. SETTING: University Eye Clinic, Aarhus, Denmark. METHODS: A consecutive, unselected series of 1289 cataractous eyes were measured with the optical technique of PCI according to the IOLMaster as well as with conventional (contact) A-scan ultrasound (US) for the measurement of axial length. For each PCI reading, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was recorded and used for comparison with the US measurement. All patients had routine phacoemulsification with implantation of an intraocular lens (IOL). In 284 cases, the patients were reexamined 2 to 3 months after surgery and the axial length was again measured using PCI. The readings of the IOLMaster, which had been calibrated against immersion US from the manufacturer, were recalculated to represent the true optical length and used in the analysis of the consistency of the measurements. RESULTS: Not all readings obtainable with the IOLMaster were of good quality, and large differences with conventional US were found. The error between US and PCI decreased significantly with increasing SNR, showing a minimum error at an SNR value above 2.1. The SNR correlated significantly with the visual acuity with considerable scatter, however. Excluding readings with a poor quality (SNR
PubMed ID
16105605 View in PubMed
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Can we prevent angle-closure glaucoma?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50532
Source
Eye. 2005 Oct;19(10):1119-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
G J Johnson
P J Foster
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and International Eye Health, Institute of Ophthalmology, UCL, Summertown, Oxford OX2 7QB, UK. g.j.johnson@btopenworld.com
Source
Eye. 2005 Oct;19(10):1119-24
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anterior Chamber - pathology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Biometry
Glaucoma, Angle-Closure - diagnosis - ethnology - prevention & control
Humans
Inuits
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
PURPOSE: Glaucoma is the second cause, after cataract, of world blindness. Approximately half is thought to be primary angle-closure glaucoma (ACG). This review asks whether ACG can be prevented on a population basis. METHODS AND POPULATIONS: Review of published information from the Inuit of Greenland, Canada and Alaska, and descriptions of recent studies in Asian populations in Mongolia, China and South-East Asia. RESULTS: The Greenland Inuit have the shallowest anterior chamber depths (ACDs) so far recorded. The proportion of blindness due to ACG was reduced from 64% to 9% over 37 years by systematic optical measurement of central ACD and the van Herick test in the older Inuit, followed by gonioscopy and prophylactic iridectomy or laser iridotomy when indicated. In Mongolia, ultrasound measurement of central ACD had good sensitivity and specificity as a screening test. A randomized controlled trial of screening and prophylactic laser is being completed. In China and South-East Asia, the mechanism of angle closure appears to be more varied and complex and its detection may require more elaborate imaging. CONCLUSIONS: The mechanism of angle closure and potential for prevention by screening are likely to have to be determined specifically for each population at risk.
PubMed ID
16304593 View in PubMed
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Chronic open-angle glaucoma and associated ophthalmic findings in monozygotic twins and their spouses in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50939
Source
J Glaucoma. 1999 Apr;8(2):134-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
M S Gottfredsdottir
T. Sverrisson
D C Musch
E. Stefansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, W. K. Kellogg Eye Center, Ann Arbor, USA.
Source
J Glaucoma. 1999 Apr;8(2):134-9
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anterior Chamber - pathology
Chronic Disease
Disease Transmission, Vertical
Diseases in Twins
Exfoliation Syndrome - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Glaucoma, Open-Angle - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Intraocular Pressure
Male
Middle Aged
Optic Disk - pathology
Prospective Studies
Refractive Errors - epidemiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twins, Monozygotic
Visual acuity
Abstract
PURPOSE: To determine the concordance of glaucoma and ocular parameters in monozygotic twins and their spouses. METHODS: This was a prospective study that included 50 twin pairs 55 years of age or older and 47 of their spouses. Zygosity was determined by genetic laboratory testing. RESULTS: The concordance of open-angle glaucoma in monozygotic twin pairs was 98.0%, which significantly exceeded that of twin/spouse pairs (70.2%). There was a significant association in mean intraocular pressure (IOP), mean axial length, anterior chamber depth, and refractive error in the twin pairs. However, there was no association between the twins and their spouses for these ocular parameters. Eight twin pairs were found to have pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PXFS), five of which were concordant. There was no association between glaucoma and mean axial length or glaucoma and refractive error in the twin pairs studied. CONCLUSION: The statistically significant higher concordance of glaucoma--and the high correlation of mean IOP, mean axial length, anterior chamber depth, and refractive error--in twin pairs and the lack of association of these factors in twin/spouse pairs strongly suggests the importance of genetic factors for these ocular parameters.
PubMed ID
10209731 View in PubMed
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Corneal perforation and delayed anterior chamber collapse from a devil's club thorn.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92348
Source
Cornea. 2008 Sep;27(8):961-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Mader Thomas H
Werner Robert P
Chamberlain David G
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. thmader@anmc.org
Source
Cornea. 2008 Sep;27(8):961-2
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anterior Chamber - pathology - surgery
Child
Cornea - injuries - surgery
Corneal Diseases - etiology - surgery
Eye Injuries, Penetrating - etiology - surgery
Female
Humans
Nylons
Oplopanax
Plant Stems
Rupture
Suture Techniques
Sutures
Abstract
PURPOSE: To report the corneal perforation and delayed collapse of the anterior chamber caused by the thorn from a devil's club plant. METHODS: An 8-year-old Alaska Native girl was struck in the eye with the stalk and leaves of a devil's club plant. Although 3 thorns from the plant were found to be lodged superficially in the corneal stroma, 1 was deeply embedded to the level of Descemet's membrane. The thorn was surrounded by a stromal infiltrate. Four days after the injury, the patient suffered a sudden collapse of the anterior chamber after the deeply embedded thorn became dislodged. RESULTS: The corneal wound was sutured, and the patient had an uneventful postoperative course. CONCLUSIONS: Our experience suggests that devil's club corneal injuries should be examined daily after the initial injury. The anterior chamber may suddenly collapse after a deeply embedded thorn becomes dislodged.
PubMed ID
18724165 View in PubMed
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Early detection of primary angle-closure glaucoma. Limbal and axial chamber depth screening in a high risk population (Greenland Eskimos).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5421
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1988 Oct;66(5):556-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1988
Author
P H Alsbirk
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1988 Oct;66(5):556-64
Date
Oct-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Anterior Chamber - pathology
Blindness - prevention & control
Female
Glaucoma - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Gonioscopy
Greenland
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Visual acuity
Abstract
In an unselected population of 541 Greenland Eskimos, a survey was performed aiming at early primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) detection. Of the men 162/274 and women 182/267 were above the age of 40. The ophthalmological examination included slit-lamp grading of limbal chamber depth (LCD), axial Haag Streit pachymetric chamber depth (ACD) measurement and direct gonioscopy in all shallow chamber cases. Dark room prone position provocative tests were extensively used in suspects. In 3 men and 5 women PACG was diagnosed, giving, above age 40, a prevalence of 2% in men (3/162) and increasing the PACG prevalence to 10% in women (18/182) as 13 were known a priori. PACG suspects, needing prophylactical iridectomy or pilocarpine, constituted 1 man and 6 women. Furthermore, narrow angles were found in 14 men and 27 women above age 40, and so far untreated. On the present background of highly effective surgical and YAG-laser iridectomy facilities in early PACG, local, other arctic and global prevention of blindness aspects are briefly discussed, with a special outlook to SE-Asia.
PubMed ID
3218480 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.