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20 records – page 1 of 2.

Ascorbic acid plasma levels and gingival health in personnel wintering over in Antarctica.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293822
Source
Journal of Dental Research. 40(4):789-799.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1961
Author
Perlitsh, M.J.
Nielsen, A.G.
Stanmeyer, W.R.
Author Affiliation
Dental Branch, U.S. Naval Medical Research Laboratory, U.S.N. Submarine Base, New London, Connecticut
Source
Journal of Dental Research. 40(4):789-799.
Date
1961
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ascorbic acid plasma
Dental health
Antarctica
Gingival health
Male
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The assessment of bone mineral density, calcium, and vitamin D intake and exposure in British Antarctic Survey personnel

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256653
Source
Pages 330-331 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
continent of Antarctica in the winter months, and compare the subsequent BMD loss incurred against a healthy UK based control group. Vitamin D deficiency as a result of a lack of sun exposure has never been studied in British Antarctic Survey (BAS) personnel before. The possible health implications for
  1 document  
Author
Boon D
Grant I
Gawn L
Cross S/
Knapp K
Vivian G
Moniz C
Rees G
Marquis P
Author Affiliation
The British Antarctic Survey & SCAR Expert Group
Source
Pages 330-331 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Antarctica
Bone Mineral Density
Calcium
Vitamin D
Sun exposure
Exercise
UVB radiation
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Biological dosimetry of solar UV radiation in Antarctica using spores of Bacillus subtilis

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102199
Source
Pages 410-412 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
= Arctic Medical Research vol. 53: Suppl. 2, pp. 410-412, 1994 Biological Dosimetry of Solar UV-Radiation in Antarctica, Using Spores of Bacillus subtilis Monika PuskeppeleitI, Lothar Quintem2, Saad El Naggar3, Jobst Ulrich Schott, Ute Eschweiler, Gerda Honeck, and Horst Biicker4
  1 document  
Author
Puskeppeleit, M
Quintern, L
El Naggar, S
Schott, JU
Eschweiler, U
Honeck, G
Bücker, H
Bucker, H
Author Affiliation
German Society for Polar Medicine, Bremerhaven, FR Germany
German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR-PT-USF), Bonn, FR Germany
Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar Marine Research, Bremerhaven, FR Germany
German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR), Institute for Aerospace Medicine, Köln, Germany
Source
Pages 410-412 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Antarctica
Biological dosimetry
Bacillus subtilis
Concentrations
Exposure
Measurements
Ozone depletion
Seasonal trend
Solar light
UV radiation
Abstract
The main objective of our pilot study was to assess the influence of the seasonal stratospheric ozone depletion on the Antarctic UV climate by using bacterial spores. Using a biosystem as integrating UV detector, the wavelength is weighted by their cytotoxic effects without difficult setup of instruments necessary for physical dosimetry.
Documents
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Contrasting climate change in the two polar regions

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276021
Source
Polar Research 2009 Jul;28(2):146-164
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Turner, J
Overland, J
Author Affiliation
British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK
Source
Polar Research 2009 Jul;28(2):146-164
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antarctica
Arctic
Ice-albedo feedback
Sea ice
Southern Ocean
Warming
Abstract
The two polar regions have experienced remarkably different climatic changes in recent decades. The Arctic has seen a marked reduction in sea-ice extent throughout the year, with a peak during the autumn. A new record minimum extent occurred in 2007, which was 40% below the long-term climatological mean. In contrast, the extent of Antarctic sea ice has increased, with the greatest growth being in the autumn. There has been a large-scale warming across much of the Arctic, with a resultant loss of permafrost and a reduction in snow cover. The bulk of the Antarctic has experienced little change in surface temperature over the last 50 years, although a slight cooling has been evident around the coast of East Antarctica since about 1980, and recent research has pointed to a warming across West Antarctica. The exception is the Antarctic Peninsula, where there has been a winter (summer) season warming on the western (eastern) side. Many of the different changes observed between the two polar regions can be attributed to topographic factors and land/sea distribution. The location of the Arctic Ocean at high latitude, with the consequently high level of solar radiation received in summer, allows the ice-albedo feedback mechanism to operate effectively. The Antarctic ozone hole has had a profound effect on the circulations of the high latitude ocean and atmosphere, isolating the continent and increasing the westerly winds over the Southern Ocean, especially during the summer and winter.
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Cutaneous immune responses in Antarctica. A reflection of immune status?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76749
Source
Pages 249-251 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Arctic Medical Research, Vol. 47: Suppl. 1, pp. 249-251, 1988 CUTANEOUS IMMUNE RESPONSES IN ANTARCTICA A reflection of immune status? H. K. Muller, D. J. Lugg and D. L. Williams Department of Pathology, University of Tasmania and Department of Science, Antarctic Division, Hobart, Tasmania
  1 document  
Author
Muller, H.K.
Lugg, D.J.
Williams, D.L.
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Tasmania
Department of Science, Arctic Division, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Source
Pages 249-251 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Antarctica
Cell mediated immunity (CMI)
Cutaneous immune responses
Immunosuppression
Isolation
Macquarie Island
Mawson
Documents
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The development of telemedicine systems using remote Antarctic sites as a space analogue

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102100
Source
Pages 98-101 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
this project, simulated medical consultations were set up at I) an Antarctic base and 2) deep field sites in Antarctica to test the efficacy of a medical assessment questionnaire to report with speed and accuracy on the condition of the patient. Possible medical scenarios were selected "blind" from
  1 document  
Author
Maclean, J.R
Author Affiliation
RGIT. Survival Centre, Aberdeen, UK
Source
Pages 98-101 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Antarctica
Communication skills
Practitioner skills
Telemedicine
Abstract
The RGIT Survival Centre Ltd. is currently responsible for providing medical care for workers in 3 remote areas: the Antarctic, the North Sea, and desert areas of the Middle East. These systems are based on simple telemedical methods in that the remote practitioner who may be first aider, paramedic, or doctor relies on specialist advice from distant base. The speed and quality of this advice is dependent on the quality of clinical information received by the base. The European Space Agency has commissioned the British Antarctic Survey Medical Unit to evaluate the methods currently used, to highlight shortcomings, and to recommend and test improvements. As a part of this project, simulated medical consultations were set up at (1) an Antarctic base and (2) deep field sites in Antarctica to test the efficacy of a medical assessment questionnaire to report with speed and accuracy on the condition of the patient. Possible medical scenarios were selected ?blind? from a list of 30 likely cases with a script for the patient. The experiments have demonstrated that the skilled first aider may be a very effective remote practitioner but that training of the remote practitioner, particularly in examination skills, and of the base doctor in communication skills must be improved to make optimal use of the telemedicine system.
Documents
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Earth's ice: Sea level, climate, and our future commitment

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276025
Source
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. 2011 Jan;67(1):28-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Scambos, T
Source
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. 2011 Jan;67(1):28-40
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antarctica
Arctic
Climate change
Cryosphere
Global warming
Greenhouse gases
Greenland
Sea ice
Sea level rise
Abstract
The world's icy and snowy regions--the cryosphere--are where the most profound changes will occur as the globe continues warming. In many areas, the levels of cryospheric change today are surpassing any seen in the past hundreds to thousands of years. This amplified response has a simple explanation: Most of the cryosphere is, on average, near the freezing point. Small shifts in temperature push large regions to a different physical state. However, while the processes leading to the loss of ice are quickly started, they do not quickly stop. We are on the verge of committing ourselves to sizable increases in sea level. The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report estimated sea level rise in this century at just 20 to 60 centimeters, but that total did not include contributions from the break-up and flow of ice sheets. The melting of mountain glaciers and ice in Greenland and Antarctica could add an additional meter of sea level rise. An equally important effect may be the feedback that changes in ice--especially the ice-covered ocean--have on climate in both the polar and the temperate regions of the world. The author describes the processes that are rapidly eroding polar ice.
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The effect of a year in the Antarctic on human thermal and metabolic responses to an acute standardized cold stress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298753
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-9. 21 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
March 1961
  1 document  
Author
Milan, Frederick A.
Elsner, Robert W.
Rodahl, Kaare
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-60-9. 21 p.
Date
March 1961
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3549732
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Antarctica
Humans
Metabolism
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Body temperature
Physiological adaptation
Abstract
The metabolic rate and thermal responses of eight healthy subjects exposed nude for 2 hours to a standard cold stress (17° +/- 1. 0° C air temperature) were examined in the fall, winter, and spring at Little America V in the Antarctic. Mean body, average skin and foot temperatures increased significantly (P
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.60-9
Documents
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Human interaction with the Antarctic environment: Studies in immunology, photobiology and epidemiology

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102198
Source
Pages 407-409 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
, photobiology and epidemiology carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) over the past decade are described. Although subjects generally spend from one to two years continuously in Antarctica many return a number of times. In order to assess the long term effects of the
  1 document  
Author
Lugg, D
Author Affiliation
Australian Antarctic Division, Kingston, Tasmania, Australia
Source
Pages 407-409 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Antarctica
Environment
Epidemiology
Health effects
Immunology
Latitudes
Ozone depletion
Photobiology
UV exposure
Abstract
Interrelated studies on immunology, photobiology, and epidemiology carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) over the past decade are described. Although subjects generally spend from one to two years continuously in Antarctica, many return a number of times. In order to assess the long-term effects of the environment and UV exposure and whether the outdoor clothing gives protection in Antarctica, proposed studies are outlined. In assessing the health effects of ozone depletion it is important to review the incidences of UV -related disease in different latitudes as well as to compare latitudes in different hemispheres. Comparisons between North and South polar regions may be valuable for future management.
Documents
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IPCC Workshop on Sea Level Rise and Ice Sheet Instabilities

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275990
Source
Workshop report, IPCC meeting held June 21-24, 2010, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Oct-2010
  1 website  
Author
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
Source
Workshop report, IPCC meeting held June 21-24, 2010, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Antarctica
Glaciers
Greenland
Ice caps
Ice sheets
Observations
Projections
Sea level
Abstract
Sea level rise is one of the major long-term consequences of human-induced climate change. Future projections of sea level changes and their regional expression are of crucial importance for the sustainability of coastal settlements around the world. The Fourth Assessment Report of IPCC (AR4) had comprehensively assessed key processes contributing to past, present and future sea level changes. However, process understanding was limited and thus both size and uncertainties associated with some of these contributions remained still largely unknown. This also hampered the overall projections of global mean sea level rise in AR4. The future dynamical behaviour of the large polar ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland in a changing climate was identified as the primary origin of the large uncertainty in the AR4 projections of sea level rise for the 21st century. IPCC Working Group I (WGI) has acknowledged the relevance of this specific topic and thus (1) proposed a chapter on 'Sea Level Change' in its contribution to the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) and (2) organized a targeted IPCC Workshop on 'Sea Level Rise and Ice Sheet Instabilities' very early in the assessment cycle for the IPCC's AR5. This Workshop took place in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from 21 to 24 June, 2010. The Workshop brought together experts from very diverse disciplines with a wide range of expertise, covering oceanography, ice sheet dynamics, glacier research and hydrology to discuss latest results from both observations and modelling relevant for sea level change. The workshop structure included a combination of plenary sessions with invited keynote presentations, group discussions, poster sessions and, finally, topical breakout groups. This Workshop Report contains a concise summary of the overall discussions and conclusions of the Workshop as well as summaries of the discussions in the breakout groups. It further includes the extended abstracts of the keynote presentations and poster abstracts presented during the Workshop.
Online Resources
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20 records – page 1 of 2.