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Abnormal control of ventilation in high-altitude pulmonary edema.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3383
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1988 Mar;64(3):1268-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1988
Author
P H Hackett
R C Roach
R B Schoene
G L Harrison
W J Mills
Author Affiliation
Denali Medical Research Project, Center for High Latitude Health Research, University of Alaska, Anchorage 99508.
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1988 Mar;64(3):1268-72
Date
Mar-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Altitude
Anoxemia - physiopathology
Anoxia - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Male
Oxygen - metabolism
Oxygen Inhalation Therapy
Pulmonary Edema - physiopathology - therapy
Respiration
Abstract
We wished to determine the role of hypoxic chemosensitivity in high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) by studying persons when ill and upon recovery. We studied seven males with HAPE and seventeen controls at 4,400 m on Mt. McKinley. We measured ventilatory responses to both O2 breathing and progressive poikilocapnic hypoxia. Hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) was described by the slope relating minute ventilation to percent arterial O2 saturation (delta VE/delta SaO2%). HAPE subjects were quite hypoxemic (SaO2% 59 +/- 6 vs. 85 +/- 1, P less than 0.01) and showed a high-frequency, low-tidal-volume pattern of breathing. O2 decreased ventilation in controls (-20%, P less than 0.01) but not in HAPE subjects. The HAPE group had low HVR values (0.15 +/- 0.07 vs. 0.54 +/- 0.08, P less than 0.01), although six controls had values in the same range. The three HAPE subjects with the lowest HVR values were the most hypoxemic and had a paradoxical increase in ventilation when breathing O2. We conclude that a low HVR plays a permissive rather than causative role in the pathogenesis of HAPE and that the combination of extreme hypoxemia and low HVR may result in hypoxic depression of ventilation.
PubMed ID
3366741 View in PubMed
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[Age-dependent differences of the ultrastructural changes in the myocardium after hypoxical preconditioning and ischemia-reperfusion of the isolated heart in rats]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84268
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2007;53(4):27-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Portnychenko A H
Rozova K V
Vasylenko M I
Moibenko O O
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2007;53(4):27-34
Date
2007
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Aging - pathology
Animals
Anoxia - physiopathology
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Mitochondria, Heart - ultrastructure
Myocardial Reperfusion Injury - pathology - prevention & control
Myocardium - ultrastructure
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Abstract
Recently we evidenced the ability of acute systemic hypoxia to induce phenomenon of delayed cardioprotection in rats. Age-dependent peculiarities were studied in 6 and 12 month old rats exposed to hypoxical preconditioning (10% O2, 1 or 3 h). In 24 h isolated hearts were ischemized 30 min and then reperfuzed 40 min, with or without iNOS blocker 1,3-PBIT (50 nmol/l). It was shown that hypoxic preconditioning dose-dependently injured myocardial ultrastructure, and induced delayed cardioprotection, strongly marked after 3 h preconditioning. Blockade of iNOS as mediator of delayed cardioprotection led to mitochondrial stimulation and attenuated protection. In mature aged rats, myocardial injury and protection had been individually variable, mitochondria were more damaged and stimulated to biogenesis, and incomplete autophagy was typical as distinct from young rats.
PubMed ID
17902368 View in PubMed
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[A method for intermittent hypoxic exposures in the combined treatment of bronchial asthma patients]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15697
Source
Lik Sprava. 1998 Aug;(6):104-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
T V Serebrovskaia
I N Man'kovskaia
G I Lysenko
R. Swanson
I V Belinskaia
O A Oberenko
S V Daniliuk
Source
Lik Sprava. 1998 Aug;(6):104-8
Date
Aug-1998
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anoxia - physiopathology
Asthma - blood - physiopathology - therapy
Combined Modality Therapy
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Free Radicals - blood
Humans
Respiratory Therapy - instrumentation
Time Factors
Abstract
The method of intermittent increasing normobaric isocapnic hypoxia was used for the treatment of bronchial asthma. The parameters of respiration, metabolism, free-radical processes and immune system were monitored before and after training. The therapeutic diagnostic complex "Hypotron" (Ukraine), which allowed to determine the individual reactivity of the patient's respiratory system, tolerance to hypoxia, and to choose an optimal program of treatment, was used. The hypoxic training resulted in considerable increase of lung vital capacity, maximal ventilation and forced expired velocity. Normalization of initially increased free radical processes, accompanied by a decrease in the lipid peroxidation products was observed. The hypoxic training positively influenced specific and nonspecific immunological status, and appeared to be associated with a far better stimulation of lymphocytes and neutrophils.
PubMed ID
9844890 View in PubMed
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[A new method for human orotherapeutic training]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75018
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Mar;(2):139-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
M I Volobuiev
Source
Lik Sprava. 1999 Mar;(2):139-42
Date
Mar-1999
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adult
Altitude
Anoxia - physiopathology
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Humans
Male
Physical Education and Training - methods - statistics & numerical data
Physical Fitness - physiology
Time Factors
Abstract
On completing the main course we used regular hypoxic training to maintain an effect of sustenal regimen. The studies were made in young persons divided into three groups: control group, a group undergoing training according to standard regimen, and a group of sustenal regimen of training. Training under conditions of artificial mountain air improves physical and mental performance, psychoemotional state. Sustenal regimen of training is superior to standard regimen. Sustenal regimen of hypoxic training is to be employed in military, space, sports, and clinical medicine, as well as in case of a possible influence on the human body of stressogenic factors.
PubMed ID
10424069 View in PubMed
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Animal evolution and atmospheric pO2: is there a link between gradual animal adaptation to terrain elevation due to Ural orogeny and survival of subsequent hypoxic periods?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267416
Source
Theor Biol Med Model. 2014;11:47
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Sven Kurbel
Source
Theor Biol Med Model. 2014;11:47
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Altitude
Animals
Anoxia - physiopathology
Biological Evolution
Oxygen - analysis
Russia
Abstract
Considering evolution of terrestrial animals as something happening only on flat continental plains seems wrong. Many mountains have arisen and disappeared over the geologic time scale, so in all periods some areas of high altitude existed, with reduced oxygen pressure (pO2) and increased aridity. During orogeny, animal species of the raising terrain can slowly adapt to reduced oxygen levels.This review proposes that animal evolution was often driven by atmospheric oxygen availability. Transitions of insect ancestors and amphibians out of water are here interpreted as events forced by the lack of oxygen in shallow and warm water during Devonian. Hyperoxia during early Carboniferous allowed giant insects to be predators of lowlands, forcing small amphibians to move to higher terrains, unsuitable to large insects due to reduced pO2. In arid mountainous habitats, ascended animals evolved in early reptiles with more efficient lungs and improved circulation. Animals with alveolar lungs became the mammalian ancestors, while those with respiratory duct lungs developed in archosaurs. In this interpretation, limb precursors of wings and pneumatised bones might have been adaptations for moving on steep slopes.Ural mountains have risen to an estimated height of 3000 m between 318 and 251 Mya. The earliest archosaurs have been found on the European Ural side, estimated 275 Myr old. It is proposed that Ural orogeny slowly elevated several highland habitats within the modern Ural region to heights above 2500 m. Since this process took near 60 Myr, animals in these habitats fully to adapted to hypoxia.The protracted P-Tr hypoxic extinction event killed many aquatic and terrestrial animals. Devastated lowland areas were repopulated by mammaliaformes that came down from mountainous areas. Archosaurs were better adapted to very low pO2, so they were forced to descend to the sea level later when the lack of oxygen became severe. During the Triassic period, when the relative content of O2 reduced to near 12%, archosaurs prevailed as only animals that could cope with profound hypoxia at the sea level. Their diverse descendants has become dominant terrestrial animals, until the K-Pg extinction due to meteor impact.
Notes
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Cites: J Exp Biol. 1998 Apr;201(Pt 8):1043-509510518
PubMed ID
25335870 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cerebral etiology of acute mountain sickness: a case report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238855
Source
Neurosurgery. 1985 May;16(5):693-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1985
Author
R N Wohns
M. Colpitts
T. Clement
A. Karuza
Source
Neurosurgery. 1985 May;16(5):693-5
Date
May-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Altitude Sickness - physiopathology
Anoxia - physiopathology
Brain Edema - physiopathology
Cerebral Cortex - physiopathology
Evoked Potentials, Visual
Humans
Male
Pulmonary Edema - physiopathology
Reaction Time - physiology
Abstract
The authors report a case of acute mountain sickness (AMS) experienced by a support member of the Ultima Thule Everest Expedition. The subject arrived at the 17,000-ft base camp by truck and then developed the symptoms of AMS over the following 72 hours. Flash-induced visual evoked responses (VERs), tetrapolar impedance pulmonary plethysmography, and oxygen saturation measurements were performed. These changed from normal before the onset of his symptoms to abnormal during the height of the symptoms and reverted to normal after treatment. This is the first reported case of AMS monitored with VERs. It has been postulated that AMS may be an early form of cerebral edema, and this report corroborates this hypothesis.
PubMed ID
4000444 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Characteristics of adaptation to hypoxia in pilots]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82762
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2005;51(6):63-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Kravchuk V V
Kal'nysh V V
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2005;51(6):63-9
Date
2005
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Adult
Aging - physiology
Analysis of Variance
Anoxia - physiopathology
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Military Personnel
Abstract
The features of pilot organism adaptation to the conventional for this professional group hypoxic load were studied by mathematical analysis of heart rate. Significant alteration of structure and amount of correlation intercommunications between the indices of the heart rate in pilots of different age and state of health was established.
PubMed ID
16485857 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Characteristics of central hemodynamics in high-mountain conditions and its changes in penetrating thoracic injuries].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229951
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 1989 Nov;143(11):67-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1989
Author
M S Sharif
V I Buravtsov
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 1989 Nov;143(11):67-70
Date
Nov-1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Altitude
Altitude Sickness - complications - physiopathology
Anoxia - physiopathology
Empyema - etiology
Hemodynamics - physiology
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Russia
Thoracic Injuries - complications - physiopathology
Wounds, Penetrating - complications - physiopathology
Abstract
It was found that in practically healthy inhabitants of Alpine regions the real oxygen transport is maintained by hyperdynamic regimen of blood circulation, main role in its creation belonging to growth of the stroke volume. The estimation of changing hemodynamics parameters performed by the method of integral rheography is indicated for early detection of patients with risk of the development of pleura empyema after chest wounds.
PubMed ID
2534449 View in PubMed
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50 records – page 1 of 5.