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Academic food-supply veterinarians: future demand and likely shortages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165658
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
J. Bruce Prince
David M Andrus
Kevin Gwinner
Author Affiliation
College of Business Administration, Kansas State University, Calvin 101, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. jbprince@ksu.edu
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Bioterrorism - prevention & control
Canada
Career Choice
Consumer Product Safety
Delphi Technique
Education, Veterinary - manpower - trends
Food Supply
Forecasting
Humans
Schools, Veterinary - manpower - trends
United States
Veterinary Medicine - manpower - trends
Abstract
The future demand for and potential shortages of food-supply veterinarians have been the subject of much concern. Using the Delphi forecasting method in a three-phase Web-based survey process, a panel of experts identified the trends and issues shaping the demand for and supply of academic food-animal veterinarians, then forecasted the likely future demand and shortages of food-supply veterinarians employed in academic institutions in the United States and Canada through 2016. The results indicate that there will be increasing future demand and persistent shortages of academic food-supply veterinarians unless current trends are countered with targeted, strategic action. The Delphi panel also evaluated the effectiveness of several strategies for reversing current trends and increasing the number of food-supply veterinarians entering into academic careers. Academic food-supply veterinarians are a key link in the system that produces food-supply veterinarians for all sectors (private practice, government service, etc.); shortages in the academic sector will amplify shortages wherever food-supply veterinarians are needed. Even fairly small shortages have significant public-health, food-safety, animal-welfare, and bio-security implications. Recent events demonstrate that in an increasingly interconnected global economic food supply system, national economies and public health are at risk unless an adequate supply of appropriately trained food-supply veterinarians is available to counter a wide variety of threats ranging from animal and zoonotic diseases to bioterrorism.
PubMed ID
17220489 View in PubMed
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Agriculture-related injuries in the parkland region of Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214812
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1995 Jul;41:1190-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
S K Young
Author Affiliation
Silver Heights Medical Group, Winnipeg.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1995 Jul;41:1190-7
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Agriculture - statistics & numerical data
Agrochemicals - adverse effects
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Child
Child, Preschool
Equipment and Supplies - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - classification - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Wounds and Injuries - classification - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Abstract
To review a series of farm injuries in the parkland region of Manitoba, compare the collected data to similar studies, and provide a baseline for deriving effective preventive measures for the local community.
Retrospective case study involving review of hospital charts.
The population studied was derived from the catchment area for Dauphin General Hospital, a referral centre servicing an agricultural region of 57,000 people.
Seventy-two patients were admitted to hospital between January 1981 and December 1991 after being injured by agricultural machines, farm animals, herbicides or other chemicals, and fertilizers. Four fatalities were identified through a review of local medical examiner records, for a total of 76 cases.
The following data were abstracted for each case: sex, age, time and date of injury, cause, type of injury, and body part involved.
Most cases involved men, between the ages of 20 and 69, during the afternoon and early evening with a seasonal peak in late summer. More than 60% of injuries were caused by agricultural machinery, followed by animal-related injuries (25%). Grain augers were the most common type of machine causing injury (35%). All patients younger than 9 years were female, and 75% of their injuries involved farm animals. A decreasing annual frequency of farm injuries was noted over the 11-year period. Fewer accidents involving farm machinery appear most responsible for this trend.
Many agriculture-related injuries occur in the parkland region of Manitoba. The type and pattern of injuries observed resembles those documented in other studies. With effective education and preventive measures, most injuries and fatalities could be prevented. Physicians are obliged to encourage and support educational programs in their communities and to review safety practices with patients.
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1978 Mar 4;118(5):519-22630513
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Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 1995 Oct;41:16708829575
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 1995 Jul;41:1141-527647614
PubMed ID
7647624 View in PubMed
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Allergen-specific sensitization in asthma and allergic diseases in children: the study on farmers' and non-farmers' children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15091
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Feb;35(2):160-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
S T Remes
H O Koskela
K. Iivanainen
J. Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
The Department of Pediatrics, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. Sami.Remes@ktl.fi
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Feb;35(2):160-6
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - diagnosis - immunology
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Asthma - diagnosis - immunology
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Cockroaches
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - immunology
Male
Skin Tests
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Farmers' children are less frequently sensitized to common allergens than the non-farmers' children, but less is known about their sensitization to other allergens and its association with clinical diseases. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association of farm environment with atopic sensitization, allergic diseases, expression of allergen-induced symptoms, and the importance of specific sensitization against 'common' (timothy, dog, cat, birch, Dermatophagoides pteronyssimus, mugwort) and 'other' (cockroach, horse, Lepidoglyphus destructor, cow) allergens for asthma and allergic diseases in children. METHODS: A cross-sectional study including 344 farmers' and 366 non-farmers' children aged 6-13 years in eastern Finland, using a self-administered written questionnaire and skin prick tests against the above-mentioned allergens. RESULTS: Farmers' children had less asthma and allergic diseases and were less often sensitized against common allergens than the non-farmers' children. However, little difference was observed in sensitization against the other allergens between the farmers' (17.2%) and non-farmers (14.5%) children [adjusted odds ratios (aOR) 1.11 (0.71-1.72)]. Being sensitized against only other allergens, without sensitization against common allergens, was unrelated to asthma or allergic diseases. Among the single allergens, sensitization against pets or pollen, or against horse or cow, had the strongest association with asthma, hayfever, and atopic eczema; no such association was seen in D. pteronyssimus, mugwort, cockroach, or L. destructor. Farmers' children had significantly less often symptoms of allergic rhinitis in contact with dog (aOR 0.32%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.15-0.67), cat (aOR 0.45, 0.22-0.88), or pollen (aOR 0.58%, 95% CI 0.37-0.90) than the non-farmers' children. CONCLUSION: Farm environment reduces the occurrence of asthma, allergic diseases, and atopic sensitization in children, and also the occurrence of allergen-induced rhinitis. Remarkable differences were observed between single allergens in their association with allergic disease, stressing the importance of allergen selection when defining atopy in epidemiological studies.
PubMed ID
15725186 View in PubMed
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Allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma due to sensitization to Siberian hamster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15147
Source
Allergy. 2004 Sep;59(9):1016-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
R. González-Mendiola
P. Prieto Montaño
M. Hinojosa Macías
M. Lombardero
T. Muñoz Martin
Author Affiliation
Department of Allergy, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. chargomendi@excite.com
Source
Allergy. 2004 Sep;59(9):1016-7
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Asthma - etiology
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - etiology
Cricetinae - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Male
Rhinitis - etiology
PubMed ID
15291917 View in PubMed
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Allergy in day care children: prevalence and environmental risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152862
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2009 May;98(5):817-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Katja Hatakka
Laura Piirainen
Sara Pohjavuori
Tuija Poussa
Erkki Savilahti
Riitta Korpela
Author Affiliation
Valio R&D, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2009 May;98(5):817-22
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Breast Feeding - epidemiology
Child
Child Day Care Centers - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Family Characteristics
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Infant
Logistic Models
Prevalence
Risk factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Urban Population
Abstract
To investigate the prevalence of atopic disease among Finnish day care children and the relationship between atopy and environmental factors.
A cross-sectional study of 594 day care children aged 1-6 years from Helsinki, Finland. Each child's history of atopic diseases and environmental exposure was collected in a questionnaire completed by the parents.
The prevalence of diagnosed asthma was 0.9% for the 1-3-year olds and 5.5% for the 4-6-year olds, atopic eczema/dermatis was 16% in both groups, and allergic rhinitis 5% in the younger group, 9% in the older group. According to multivariable logistic regression models, breastfeeding (exclusive > or =4 months or partial > or =6 months) reduced the risk of atopic diseases (OR = 0.60; CI(95) 0.39-0.93, p = 0.021). Atopic diseases were more common in the oldest age group, 5-6-year olds, compared to the youngest, 1-2-year olds (OR = 2.18; CI(95) 1.14-4.15, p = 0.018). One parent with atopic disease increased the child's risk (OR = 1.89; CI(95) 1.20-2.97, p = 0.006), more so if both parents had a history (OR = 3.17; CI(95) 1.48-6.78, p = 0.003).
Our results support the hypothesis that breastfeeding for at least six months may protect against atopic diseases. The child's greater age (5-6 years) and parental history of atopic diseases increased the risk of atopy.
PubMed ID
19183114 View in PubMed
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Ancient mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals complexity of indigenous North American turkey domestication.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145606
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Feb 16;107(7):2807-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-2010
Author
Camilla F Speller
Brian M Kemp
Scott D Wyatt
Cara Monroe
William D Lipe
Ursula M Arndt
Dongya Y Yang
Author Affiliation
Ancient DNA Laboratory, Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada.
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Feb 16;107(7):2807-12
Date
Feb-16-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic - genetics
Base Sequence
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Breeding - methods
Cluster analysis
DNA Primers - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Demography
Feces - chemistry
Fossils
Founder Effect
Geography
Humans
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Southwestern United States
Species Specificity
Turkeys - genetics
Abstract
Although the cultural and nutritive importance of the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) to precontact Native Americans and contemporary people worldwide is clear, little is known about the domestication of this bird compared to other domesticates. Mitochondrial DNA analysis of 149 turkey bones and 29 coprolites from 38 archaeological sites (200 BC-AD 1800) reveals a unique domesticated breed in the precontact Southwestern United States. Phylogeographic analyses indicate that this domestic breed originated from outside the region, but rules out the South Mexican domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo gallopavo) as a progenitor. A strong genetic bottleneck within the Southwest turkeys also reflects intensive human selection and breeding. This study points to at least two occurrences of turkey domestication in precontact North America and illuminates the intensity and sophistication of New World animal breeding practices.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20133614 View in PubMed
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321 records – page 1 of 33.