Skip header and navigation

Refine By

17025 records – page 1 of 1703.

1,3-Butadiene: exposure estimation, hazard characterization, and exposure-response analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186649
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2003 Jan-Feb;6(1):55-83
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Hughes
M E Meek
M. Walker
R. Beauchamp
Author Affiliation
Existing Substances Division, Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Environmental Health Centre, Tunney's Pasture PL0802B1, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0L2.
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2003 Jan-Feb;6(1):55-83
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Butadienes - metabolism - toxicity
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinogens, Environmental - toxicity
Environmental Exposure
Hazardous Substances - toxicity
Humans
Mutagens - toxicity
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Abstract
1,3-Butadiene has been assessed as a Priority Substance under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. The general population in Canada is exposed to 1,3-butadiene primarily through ambient air. Inhaled 1,3-butadiene is carcinogenic in both mice and rats, inducing tumors at multiple sites at all concentrations tested in all identified studies. In addition, 1,3-butadiene is genotoxic in both somatic and germ cells of rodents. It also induces adverse effects in the reproductive organs of female mice at relatively low concentrations. The greater sensitivity in mice than in rats to induction of these effects by 1,3-butadiene is likely related to species differences in metabolism to active epoxide metabolites. Exposure to 1,3-butadiene in the occupational environment has been associated with the induction of leukemia; there is also some limited evidence that 1,3-butadiene is genotoxic in exposed workers. Therefore, in view of the weight of evidence of available epidemiological and toxicological data, 1,3-butadiene is considered highly likely to be carcinogenic, and likely to be genotoxic, in humans. Estimates of the potency of butadiene to induce cancer have been derived on the basis of both epidemiological investigation and bioassays in mice and rats. Potencies to induce ovarian effects have been estimated on the basis of studies in mice. Uncertainties have been delineated, and, while there are clear species differences in metabolism, estimates of potency to induce effects are considered justifiably conservative in view of the likely variability in metabolism across the population related to genetic polymorphism for enzymes for the critical metabolic pathway.
PubMed ID
12587254 View in PubMed
Less detail

A < 1.7 cM interval is responsible for Dmo1 obesity phenotypes in OLETF rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47295
Source
Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2004 Jan-Feb;31(1-2):110-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
Takeshi K Watanabe
Shiro Okuno
Yuki Yamasaki
Toshihide Ono
Keiko Oga
Ayako Mizoguchi-Miyakita
Hideo Miyao
Mikio Suzuki
Hiroshi Momota
Yoshihiro Goto
Hiroichi Shinomiya
Haretsugu Hishigaki
Isamu Hayashi
Toshihiro Asai
Shigeyuki Wakitani
Toshihisa Takagi
Yusuke Nakamura
Akira Tanigami
Author Affiliation
Otsuka GEN Research Institute, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 463-10 Kagasuno, Kawauchi-cho, Tokushima 771-0192, Japan. tkw_watanabe@research.otsuka.co.jp
Source
Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2004 Jan-Feb;31(1-2):110-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Congenic
Body Weight - genetics
Crosses, Genetic
Diabetes Mellitus - genetics
Female
Hyperglycemia - genetics
Hyperlipidemia - blood - genetics
Male
Obesity
Phenotype
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred OLETF
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
1. Dmo1 (Diabetes Mellitus OLETF type I) is a major quantitative trait locus for dyslipidaemia, obesity and diabetes phenotypes of male Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. 2. Our congenic lines, produced by transferring Dmo1 chromosomal segments from the non-diabetic Brown Norway (BN) rat into the OLETF strain, have confirmed the strong, wide-range therapeutic effects of Dmo1 on dyslipidaemia, obesity and diabetes in the fourth (BC4) and fifth (BC5) generations of congenic animals. Analysis of a relatively small number of BC5 rats (n = 71) suggested that the critical Dmo1 interval lies within a
PubMed ID
14756694 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 1.9 A crystal structure of heat-labile shrimp alkaline phosphatase.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189601
Source
J Mol Biol. 2002 May 17;318(5):1265-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-2002
Author
Maaike de Backer
Sean McSweeney
Hanne B Rasmussen
Bjørn W Riise
Peter Lindley
Edward Hough
Author Affiliation
European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France.
Source
J Mol Biol. 2002 May 17;318(5):1265-74
Date
May-17-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alkaline Phosphatase - chemistry
Animals
Crystallography, X-Ray
Decapoda (Crustacea) - chemistry - enzymology
Humans
Models, Molecular
Protein Conformation
Temperature
Abstract
Alkaline phosphatases are non-specific phosphomonoesterases that are distributed widely in species ranging from bacteria to man. This study has concentrated on the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase from arctic shrimps (shrimp alkaline phosphatase, SAP). Originating from a cold-active species, SAP is thermolabile and is used widely in vitro, e.g. to dephosphorylate DNA or dNTPs, since it can be inactivated by a short rise in temperature. Since alkaline phosphatases are zinc-containing enzymes, a multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) experiment was performed on the zinc K edge, which led to the determination of the structure to a resolution of 1.9 A. Anomalous data clearly showed the presence of a zinc triad in the active site, whereas alkaline phosphatases usually contain two zinc and one magnesium ion per monomer. SAP shares the core, an extended beta-sheet flanked by alpha-helices, and a metal triad with the currently known alkaline phosphatase structures (Escherichia coli structures and a human placental structure). Although SAP lacks some features specific for the mammalian enzyme, their backbones are very similar and may therefore be typical for other higher organisms. Furthermore, SAP possesses a striking feature that the other structures lack: surface potential representations show that the enzyme's net charge of -80 is distributed such that the surface is predominantly negatively charged, except for the positively charged active site. The negatively charged substrate must therefore be directed strongly towards the active site. It is generally accepted that optimization of the electrostatics is one of the characteristics related to cold-adaptation. SAP demonstrates this principle very clearly.
PubMed ID
12083516 View in PubMed
Less detail

1H-NMR metabolomic biomarkers of poor outcome after hemorrhagic shock are absent in hibernators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267428
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e107493
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lori K Bogren
Carl J Murphy
Erin L Johnston
Neeraj Sinha
Natalie J Serkova
Kelly L Drew
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e107493
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biological Markers - blood
Hibernation
Lipids - blood
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Male
Metabolome
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Reperfusion Injury - blood - prevention & control
Sciuridae
Shock, Hemorrhagic - blood - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Hemorrhagic shock (HS) following trauma is a leading cause of death among persons under the age of 40. During HS the body undergoes systemic warm ischemia followed by reperfusion during medical intervention. Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) results in a disruption of cellular metabolic processes that ultimately lead to tissue and organ dysfunction or failure. Resistance to I/R injury is a characteristic of hibernating mammals. The present study sought to identify circulating metabolites in the rat as biomarkers for metabolic alterations associated with poor outcome after HS. Arctic ground squirrels (AGS), a hibernating species that resists I/R injury independent of decreased body temperature (warm I/R), was used as a negative control.
Male Sprague-Dawley rats and AGS were subject to HS by withdrawing blood to a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 35 mmHg and maintaining the low MAP for 20 min before reperfusing with Ringers. The animals' temperature was maintained at 37 ? 0.5 ?C for the duration of the experiment. Plasma samples were taken immediately before hemorrhage and three hours after reperfusion. Hydrophilic and lipid metabolites from plasma were then analyzed via 1H-NMR from unprocessed plasma and lipid extracts, respectively. Rats, susceptible to I/R injury, had a qualitative shift in their hydrophilic metabolic fingerprint including differential activation of glucose and anaerobic metabolism and had alterations in several metabolites during I/R indicative of metabolic adjustments and organ damage. In contrast, I/R injury resistant AGS, regardless of season or body temperature, maintained a stable metabolic homeostasis revealed by a qualitative 1H-NMR metabolic profile with few changes in quantified metabolites during HS-induced global I/R.
An increase in circulating metabolites indicative of anaerobic metabolism and activation of glycolytic pathways is associated with poor prognosis after HS in rats. These same biomarkers are absent in AGS after HS with warm I/R.
Notes
Cites: Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2010 Feb;298(2):R329-4019923364
Cites: Gerontology. 2010;56(2):220-3019602865
Cites: Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2011 Nov;301(5):R1440-5221865542
Cites: Transplantation. 2011 Dec 15;92(11):1215-2122082817
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2011 Sep 15;184(6):647-5521680948
Cites: Pharmacol Ther. 2012 Feb;133(2):230-5522138603
Cites: Bioanalysis. 2012 Feb;4(3):321-4122303835
Cites: Resuscitation. 2012 Feb;83(2):253-821864484
Cites: Comp Biochem Physiol B Biochem Mol Biol. 2012 May;162(1-3):1-922326449
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 2012 Jul;40(Web Server issue):W127-3322553367
Cites: Physiol Genomics. 2012 Jul 15;44(14):717-2722643061
Cites: Resuscitation. 2012 Sep;83(9):1166-7222353638
Cites: Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2013 May;238(5):539-4823856905
Cites: J Surg Res. 2014 Jan;186(1):338-4524124975
Cites: PLoS One. 2014;9(4):e9422524728042
Cites: Jpn J Pharmacol. 2001 Oct;87(2):143-5011700013
Cites: Am J Surg. 2001 Nov;182(5):481-511754855
Cites: J Comp Physiol B. 2010 Apr;180(4):599-61719967378
Cites: J Trauma. 2010 Jul;69(1):31-4020622576
Cites: J Surg Res. 2010 Nov;164(1):e131-920855081
Cites: Shock. 2010 Dec;34(6):565-7220386494
Cites: Comp Biochem Physiol Part D Genomics Proteomics. 2010 Dec;5(4):265-7320728417
Cites: Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2011 Jan;300(1):L4-L1120889676
Cites: J Exp Biol. 2011 Apr 15;214(Pt 8):1300-621430207
Cites: Physiol Genomics. 2011 Jul 14;43(13):799-80721540299
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(10):e2702122046435
Cites: Jpn J Pharmacol. 2002 May;89(1):36-4312083741
Cites: Horm Behav. 2003 Feb;43(2):318-2612694642
Cites: J Emerg Med. 2003 May;24(4):413-2212745044
Cites: Surgery. 2003 Aug;134(2):267-7412947328
Cites: Biol Reprod. 1988 Apr;38(3):616-223378074
Cites: J Comp Physiol B. 1988;158(1):25-373385059
Cites: Science. 1989 Jun 30;244(4912):1593-52740905
Cites: J Lipid Res. 1993 Jun;34(6):1009-198354948
Cites: J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 1994 Mar;14(2):193-2058113316
Cites: Anal Chem. 1995 Mar 1;67(5):793-8117762816
Cites: J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 1998 Feb;18(2):168-759469159
Cites: Kidney Int. 2005 Mar;67(3):1142-5115698456
Cites: Physiol Rev. 2003 Oct;83(4):1153-8114506303
Cites: Annu Rev Physiol. 2004;66:239-7414977403
Cites: Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2005 Mar;288(3):G473-8015701622
Cites: Chem Res Toxicol. 2005 Apr;18(4):639-5415833024
Cites: Annu Rev Nutr. 2005;25:469-9716011475
Cites: Anesth Analg. 2005 Dec;101(6):1577-8316301222
Cites: J Hepatol. 2006 May;44(5):956-6216223541
Cites: Stroke. 2006 May;37(5):1261-516574920
Cites: Surgery. 2006 Sep;140(3):404-1216934602
Cites: Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2006 Nov;291(5):G895-90116751173
Cites: J Surg Res. 2007 Jan;137(1):96-10217064732
Cites: JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2007 Mar-Apr;31(2):94-10017308249
Cites: Bioessays. 2007 May;29(5):431-4017450592
Cites: Acta Cardiol. 2007 Aug;62(4):381-917824299
Cites: Physiol Genomics. 2007 Sep 19;31(1):15-2417536023
Cites: J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2008 Jul;28(7):1307-1918398417
Cites: J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2008 Jul;115(7):1011-718478178
Cites: Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2008 Jul;295(1):R316-2818434441
Cites: Allergol Int. 2008 Sep;57(3):211-718566550
Cites: Crit Care. 2008;12(4):21818638356
Cites: Shock. 2009 Jan;31(1):40-918497709
Cites: Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2009 Feb;296(2):R383-9319052316
Cites: Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2008;2008:4891-419163813
Cites: Brain Res Rev. 2009 Mar;59(2):293-31518845187
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 2009 Jul;37(Web Server issue):W652-6019429898
Cites: J Neurochem. 2009 Aug;110(4):1170-919493168
Cites: Exp Biol Med (Maywood). 2009 Sep;234(9):1011-919546346
Cites: Mol Biosyst. 2010 Jan;6(1):215-2420024083
PubMed ID
25211248 View in PubMed
Less detail

1 H NMR study and multivariate data analysis of reindeer skin tanning methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291047
Source
Magn Reson Chem. 2017 Apr; 55(4):312-317
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Lizheng Zhu
Andrew J Ilott
Eleonora Del Federico
Cindie Kehlet
Torunn Klokkernes
Alexej Jerschow
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Magn Reson Chem. 2017 Apr; 55(4):312-317
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Multivariate Analysis
Plant Extracts - chemistry
Reindeer
Seasons
Skin - chemistry
Tanning - methods
Tannins - chemistry
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
Reindeer skin clothing has been an essential component in the lives of indigenous people of the arctic and sub-arctic regions, keeping them warm during harsh winters. However, the skin processing technology, which often conveys the history and tradition of the indigenous group, has not been well documented. In this study, NMR spectra and relaxation behaviors of reindeer skin samples treated with a variety of vegetable tannin extracts, oils and fatty substances are studied and compared. With the assistance of principal component analysis (PCA), one can recognize patterns and identify groupings of differently treated samples. These methods could be important aids in efforts to conserve museum leather artifacts with unknown treatment methods and in the analysis of reindeer skin tanning processes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PubMed ID
27654838 View in PubMed
Less detail

1st European Congress on Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Stockholm, Sweden, September 2-5, 1979.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62432
Source
Acta Chir Scand Suppl. 1980;498:1-160
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Source
Acta Chir Scand Suppl. 1980;498:1-160
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Humans
Metabolism
Nutrition
Parenteral Nutrition
Parenteral Nutrition, Total
PubMed ID
6776724 View in PubMed
Less detail

2nd Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science. Copenhagen, Denmark, 20-23 August 1997. Abstracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49989
Source
J Sports Sci. 1998 Jul;16(5):387-527
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Source
J Sports Sci. 1998 Jul;16(5):387-527
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Animals
Exercise
Humans
Physical Conditioning, Animal
Physical Fitness
Sports
PubMed ID
10333867 View in PubMed
Less detail

2nd International Symposium on the Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer. Lillehammer, Norway, 12-16 March 2000. Abstracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19697
Source
Breast Cancer Res. 2000;2 Suppl 1:S1-47
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2000
Source
Breast Cancer Res. 2000;2 Suppl 1:S1-47
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Animals
Breast Neoplasms
Female
Humans
Molecular Biology
PubMed ID
11439919 View in PubMed
Less detail

17025 records – page 1 of 1703.