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17512 records – page 1 of 1752.

The Nordic countries meeting on the zebrafish as a model for development and disease 2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114698
Source
Zebrafish. 2013 Mar;10(1):124-5
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Monika Andersson Lendahl
Henrik Zetterberg
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Stockholm, Sweden. monika.andersson.lendahl@ki.se
Source
Zebrafish. 2013 Mar;10(1):124-5
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Disease Models, Animal
Housing, Animal
Humans
Models, Animal
Sweden
Zebrafish - genetics - growth & development - physiology
Abstract
The first Nordic Countries Meeting on the Zebrafish as a Model for Development and Disease took place at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, November 21-23, 2012. The meeting gathered 130 scientists, students, and company representatives from Iceland, Finland, Norway, Denmark, and Sweden, as well as invited guests and keynote speakers from England, Scotland, Germany, Poland, The Netherlands, Singapore, Japan, and the United States. Presentations covered a wide range of topics, including developmental biology, genetics, evolutionary biology, toxicology, behavioral studies, and disease mechanisms. The need for formal guidance and training in zebrafish housing, husbandry, and health monitoring was recognized, and the meeting expressed its support for the joint working group of the FELASA/COST action BM0804 EuFishBioMed. The decision was made to turn the Nordic meeting into an annual event and create a Nordic network of zebrafish researchers.
Notes
Cites: Dev Dyn. 2011 Jul;240(7):1856-6321674687
Cites: Genome Res. 2011 Aug;21(8):1328-3821555364
Cites: J Neurosci. 2012 Apr 11;32(15):5097-10522496555
Cites: Genomics. 2012 Oct;100(4):203-1122814267
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Dec 26;109(52):E3631-923236181
PubMed ID
23590403 View in PubMed
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Assigning ethical weights to clinical signs observed during toxicity testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279975
Source
ALTEX. 2017;34(1):148-156
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Joakim Ringblom
Elin Törnqvist
Sven Ove Hansson
Christina Rudén
Mattias Öberg
Source
ALTEX. 2017;34(1):148-156
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Care Committees
Animal Experimentation - ethics
Animal Testing Alternatives
Animal Welfare - ethics
Animals
Rats
Sweden
Toxicity Tests - ethics
Abstract
Reducing the number of laboratory animals used and refining experimental procedures to enhance animal welfare are fundamental questions to be considered in connection with animal experimentation. Here, we explored the use of cardinal ethical weights for clinical signs and symptoms in rodents by conducting trade-off interviews with members of Swedish Animal Ethics Committees in order to derive such weights for nine typical clinical signs of toxicity. The participants interviewed represent researchers, politically nominated political nominees and representatives of animal welfare organizations. We observed no statistically significant differences between these groups with respect to the magnitude of the ethical weights assigned, though the political nominees tended to assign lower weights. Overall, hunched posture was considered the most severe clinical sign and body weight loss the least severe. The ethical weights assigned varied considerably between individuals, from zero to infinite value, indicating discrepancies in prioritization of reduction and refinement. Cardinal ethical weights may be utilized to include both animal welfare refinement and reduction of animal use in designing as well as in retrospective assessment of animal experiments. Such weights may also be used to estimate ethical costs of animal experiments.
PubMed ID
27442998 View in PubMed
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[Fish nutrition. Brief review for the practitioner regarding food and ornamental fish]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4836
Source
Tijdschr Diergeneeskd. 2000 May 15;125(10):316-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2000
Author
C L van Limborgh
Source
Tijdschr Diergeneeskd. 2000 May 15;125(10):316-20
Date
May-15-2000
Language
Dutch
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed
Animal Husbandry - methods - standards
Animal Nutrition
Animals
English Abstract
Fishes - physiology
Abstract
In behalf of the practitioner a short survey is given about nutrition of fish and shrimps. Interrelations between fish development and influences by their water ecosystem concerning temperature, mineral and gas levels, waterflow et cetera together with the supply of food are mentioned. Further comments are given about common nutritional needs of different species in connection with growth, bodyweight et cetera and purpose of fishkeeping for instance for consumption, reproduction or ornamentally in different systems from aquarium to lagoon. More specifically feed formulation from raw materials to complete diets and nutritional analyses in respect to allowances for maintenance and growth are discussed. Data about fresh- and saltwater species from tropical to arctic circumstances mentioning trout, salmon, catfish, carp, sea bass, shrimp et cetera are given. Some remarks about manufacturing, and application of complete compound feeds are added to the survey. In behalf of further study or for enhancement of knowledge a number of books are recommended in a list of references.
PubMed ID
10881324 View in PubMed
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[Zoohygienic evaluation of the methods of summering cows]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62457
Source
Veterinariia. 1978 May;(5):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1978

[The calf mortality of the Angeså reindeer herd (author's transl)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62527
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1975 May;27(5):241-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1975
Author
C. Rehbinder
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1975 May;27(5):241-52
Date
May-1975
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed
Animal Nutrition
Animals
Animals, Newborn
English Abstract
Mortality
Reindeer
Seasons
Sweden
Abstract
The heavy losses of reindeer calves in the Angeså forest herd and their seasonal occurrence are discussed on basis of the results obtained from the tables. The management, productivity and breeding conditions of this herd are estimated to be, for the most part the same as in other forest herds. The calf losses in the Angeså herd are high, during some years very high, while the reproductivity rate is comparable to that of the caribou. The extensive form of management makes it impossible to clarify most of the causes for the losses and their interrelationships. Preobrazhenskii (1961) emphasizes the importance of an intensive form of management and of counting the herd at least four times annually in order to control and prevent different kinds of losses. Skjenneberg & Slagsvold (1968) point out that the extensive form of management hinders progress in reindeer breeding, especially in the areas of selection and disease control. These statements seem to be highly relevant to Swedish reindeer breeding as well. The results from the tables clearly indicate the high total losses, the high losses during certain summers and the importance of accessible winter fodder for calf production and post-natal survival. It is important to investigate whether supplementary feeding with commercially available fodder, hay, and minerals would result in better economy in reindeer breeding. It is also desirable to investigate improved methods for supplementary feeding. During certain years calf losses are very high during the summer, but the relationships between different causes (such as stress, bloodsucking diphtera, parasites, keratitis etc.) are not clear. Surveillance of the animals during the calving season, marking of the calves before the fly season and summer heat, and developing a higher degree of domestication will probably result in smaller losses during spring and summer. If the practice of marking the calves in summer is to be continued, steps must be taken to protect the health of the animals. Such steps include making available sun shades, smoke fires against bloodsucking insects, running water, and salt and mineral feedings. Due to the extensive management form, it has not been possible to determine the extent of the real winter losses. For similar reasons the extent of the losses caused by parasites remains unclear. A continuous pathological examination of dead animals seems to offer the only possible method for clarifying the causal connections of the losses. As a consequence of the extensive form of management, the carcasses of animals that die during spring and summer are destroyed by heat and scavengers. One way of obtaining material useful for pathological examination would be a telemetric method, in which a radio signal is transmitted when the animals is dead or dying (Moell & Rehbinder 1975).
PubMed ID
1153276 View in PubMed
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The welfare of animals used in science: how the "Three Rs" ethic guides improvements.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151026
Source
Can Vet J. 2009 May;50(5):523-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Nicole Fenwick
Gilly Griffin
Clément Gauthier
Author Affiliation
Canadian Council on Animal Care, 1510-130 Albert Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5G4.
Source
Can Vet J. 2009 May;50(5):523-30
Date
May-2009
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry - standards
Animal Testing Alternatives
Animal Welfare - ethics - standards
Animals
Animals, Laboratory
Canada
Humans
Laboratory Animal Science - ethics
Pain - prevention & control - veterinary
Quality of Life
Notes
Cites: Trends Neurosci. 2001 Apr;24(4):207-1111250003
Cites: ILAR J. 2002;43(4):244-5812391400
Cites: Lab Anim. 2008 Jul;42(3):277-8318625582
Cites: Altern Lab Anim. 2004 Nov;32(5):525-3215656775
Cites: PLoS One. 2008;3(2):e154518253493
Cites: Nature. 2004 Dec 16;432(7019):821-215602544
PubMed ID
19436640 View in PubMed
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Showing leadership in welfare: position statements and some of their consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177688
Source
Can Vet J. 2004 Sep;45(9):781-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Caroline J Hewson
Author Affiliation
Sir James Dunn Animal Welfare Centre, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3. chewson@upei.ca
Source
Can Vet J. 2004 Sep;45(9):781-5
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry - methods - standards
Animal Rights
Animal Welfare
Animals
Canada
Communication
Housing, Animal - standards
Humans
Leadership
Organizational Policy
Veterinary Medicine - standards
Notes
Comment In: Can Vet J. 2004 Nov;45(11):944-5015600162
PubMed ID
15510692 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Vet J. 2003 Apr;44(4):335-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Caroline J Hewson
Author Affiliation
Sir James Dunn Animal Welfare Centre, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3. chewson@upei.ca
Source
Can Vet J. 2003 Apr;44(4):335-6
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry - methods - standards
Animal Welfare
Animals
Animals, Domestic - physiology - psychology
Canada
Handling (Psychology)
Housing, Animal
Humans
Veterinarians - psychology
Veterinary Medicine - standards
Notes
Cites: Can Vet J. 2002 Sep;43(9):687-9412240525
PubMed ID
12715990 View in PubMed
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17512 records – page 1 of 1752.