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[Change in certain forms of aggressive behavior and the concentration of monoamines in the brain during selection of wild rats for taming]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12729
Source
Zh Vyssh Nerv Deiat Im I P Pavlova. 1985 Jul-Aug;35(4):703-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
E M Nikulina
P M Borodin
N K Popova
Source
Zh Vyssh Nerv Deiat Im I P Pavlova. 1985 Jul-Aug;35(4):703-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aggression - physiology
Animal Population Groups - physiology
Animals
Animals, Domestic - physiology
Animals, Wild - physiology
Biogenic Amines - analysis
Brain Chemistry
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid - analysis
Male
Norepinephrine - analysis
Rats
Selection (Genetics)
Serotonin - analysis
Abstract
Norway rats have been selected during 20 generations by the absence of aggressive reaction to man (tamed rats). From 7 up to 20th generations of selection, different forms of aggressive behaviour (reaction to glove, intermale, shock-induced aggression and predatory aggression) were studied, and the level of noradrenaline, serotonin and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid was determined in the brain. In the absence of aggressive reaction to glove in tamed rats, the shock-induced aggression considerably decreased while the predatory aggressiveness (mouse-killing behaviour) and intermale aggressiveness did not change. Beginning from 15-16th generation of selection, a higher level of the 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in the hypothalamus was established, in the 20th generation an increased content of serotonin was revealed in the hypothalamus and the midbrain. In some generations of selection an increased level of noradrenaline in the hypothalamus in comparison to wild rats was observed. A conclusion is made that the selection of animals by taming unequally influences different kinds of aggressiveness and is accompanied by inherited consolidated reorganization of the monoamine brain systems.
PubMed ID
2413648 View in PubMed
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Disgust sensitivity and the sex difference in fears to common indigenous animals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202814
Source
Behav Res Ther. 1999 Mar;37(3):273-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999
Author
W A Arrindell
S. Mulkens
J. Kok
J. Vollenbroek
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Psychology, Academic Hospital, University of Groningen, The Netherlands. w.arrindell@ppsw.rug.nl
Source
Behav Res Ther. 1999 Mar;37(3):273-80
Date
Mar-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animal Population Groups
Animals
Arousal
Fear
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality
Abstract
Davey's mediational hypothesis [Davey, G. C. L. (1994). Self-reported fears to common indigenous animals in an adult UK population: the role of disgust sensitivity. British Journal of Psychology, 85, 541-554.] suggests that the sex difference in self-assessed animal fears can be accounted for by the sex difference in disgust sensitivity. An empirical test failed to support this hypothesis in a non-clinical sample (N = 214). Holding constant the influences of confounders such as age, fear of contamination, sex roles, neuroticism, psychoticism and disgust sensitivity, biological sex kept emerging as a significant predictor in relation to four types of animal fears (fear-relevant animals, dry or non-slimy invertebrates, slimy or wet looking animals and farm animals). Other things being equal, high disgust sensitivity either lost its predictive capability (in relation to dry or non-slimy invertebrates and slimy or wet looking animals) or predicted high fear of fear-relevant animals and of farm animals inequivalently across, respectively, the sexes (high in females only) and age groups (high in the old only). A multifactorial, interactionist approach should be advocated in the study of the aetiology of animal fears if progress in this area is to be achieved.
PubMed ID
10087645 View in PubMed
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Eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in school children living in a mountainous area of Norway: a population-based study of ECP as a tool for diagnosing asthma in children with reference values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15521
Source
Allergy. 2001 Feb;56(2):138-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
F. Nja
O D Røksund
K H Carlsen
Author Affiliation
Geilomo Children's Hospital for Asthma and Allergy, Geilo and Sandvika, Norway.
Source
Allergy. 2001 Feb;56(2):138-44
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animal Population Groups - immunology
Animals
Asthma - blood - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Blood Proteins - analysis
Child
Eosinophil Granule Proteins
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - immunology
Norway
Reference Standards
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ribonucleases
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Most previous studies on eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) have been performed on carefully selected groups of asthmatic patients. Few studies based upon population cohorts have been reported. The primary objective of the present study was to assess the usefulness of serum eosinophil cationic protein (s-ECP) in the diagnosis of asthma in schoolchildren and determine reference values based on measurements in healthy children. METHODS: The population consisted of 216 schoolchildren (aged 7-16 years) who in a previous questionnaire had reported asthma or asthma-like symptoms and a control group. The questionnaire study comprised the entire population of schoolchildren in Upper Hallingdal. After clinical assessment, blood samples, and skin prick tests, these subjects were then reclassified into four groups: atopic and nonatopic asthmatic and nonasthmatics. S-ECP was assessed in relation to atopy, asthma severity, allergen exposure, and sex. RESULTS: The asthma group (n = 105) had significantly higher mean s-ECP level than the nonasthma group (n = 111) (13.3 vs 8.3 microg/l, P
PubMed ID
11167374 View in PubMed
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Ethanol selection in wild-trapped agouti and laboratory albino Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12994
Source
Physiol Behav. 1981 Apr;26(4):677-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1981

Historic cohort study in Montreal's fur industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235788
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1987;12(2):181-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
D. Guay
J. Siemiatycki
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine Research Centre, Institu Armand-Frappier, Laval-des-Rapides, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1987;12(2):181-93
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animal Population Groups
Animals
Coloring Agents - adverse effects
Hair
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Quebec
Risk
Tanning
Abstract
A historic cohort mortality study was carried out among two groups of male workers in the Montreal fur industry: 263 dressers and dyers and 599 fur garment manufacturers. The first group is exposed to a very wide variety of chemicals used in tanning, cleaning, and dyeing fur, including substances considered to be carcinogenic and/or mutagenic. The second group is exposed to residue from the dressing and dyeing stage and to respirable fur dust. The cohorts consisted of all active members of two unions as of January 1, 1966. The mean age of the workers was 43.2 and the mean number of years since first employment 14.1. The follow-up period was from January 1, 1966, to December 31, 1981; 95% of the workers were successfully traced. Observed deaths were compared with those expected based on mortality rates of the population of metropolitan Montreal. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for the manufacturers were significantly low, probably because of the ethnic composition of the cohort and a healthy worker effect. SMRs for the dressers and dyers were also low, but not as low as for the manufacturers. When attention was restricted to the French Canadians in the cohort, the observed deaths were close to the expected; there was a noteworthy excess of colorectal cancer (four observed, 0.8 expected) for dressers and dyers. Apart from this weak suggestive evidence, the results did not indicate any excess mortality risks in the fur industry. However, because of the relatively small number of expected and observed deaths in the cohort and especially among the heavily exposed dressers and dyers, the confidence intervals around SMR estimates were wide and excess risks cannot be ruled out.
PubMed ID
3661571 View in PubMed
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Lead-210 and polonium-210 in biological samples from Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242
Source
Science. 1966 May 20;152(725):1062-1064
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1966
Author
Beasley, T.M.
Palmer, H.E.
Author Affiliation
Battelle
Source
Science. 1966 May 20;152(725):1062-1064
Date
May-1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Anaktuvuk Pass
Diet, traditional
Food chain
Lead-210
Polonium-210
Alaska
Animal Population Groups Animals Food contamination, radioactive Humans Lead Meat Plants Polonium Radioisotopes
Animals
Food contamination, radioactive
Humans
Lead
Meat
Plants
Radioisotopes
Abstract
Measurements of Pb-210 and Po-210 in caribou, seal meat, lichen, and other foodstuffs used by Alaskan Eskimos show unusually high concentrations. These naturally occurring isotopes are concentrated in the Alaskan ecosystem, which results in the caribous receiving higher than "natural" levels of internal radiation, presumably for centuries. From this study, organ doses of approximately 350-450 mrad per year are calculated for the liver, kidney, and bone of caribou due to Po-210. This also corresponds with data from other investigators who found much higher levels of these same isotopes in Eskimos than in other U.S. residents. The significance of these findings is discussed in relationship to ICRP permissible body burdens, and it is postulated that these individuals might exceed the permissible values for nonoccupational exposures for certain periods, when the present body burdens of cesium-137 from nuclear weapon fallout are also taken into account.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 813.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 121.
PubMed ID
5931448 View in PubMed
Less detail

Long-term interactions between migratory caribou, wildfires and Nunavik hunters inferred from tree rings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6650
Source
Ambio. 2004 Dec;33(8):482-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Serge Payette
Stéphane Boudreau
Claude Morneau
Nadia Pitre
Author Affiliation
Université Laval, Québec City, Canada. serge.payette@bio.ulaval.ca
Source
Ambio. 2004 Dec;33(8):482-6
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Population Groups
Animals
Ecosystem
Environment
Fires - history - statistics & numerical data
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Inuits - history - statistics & numerical data
Meat
Plant Components
Population Dynamics
Quebec
Reindeer
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Trees
Abstract
Barren-ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus) herds in North America may reach considerable size and undertake large-scale seasonal migrations from the Arctic tundra to the boreal forest. To test the caribou decline hypothesis associated with native harvesting and fire, we have documented the long-term trends of caribou activity based on a novel approach which uses tree-ring dated trampling scars produced by caribou hooves in the extensive trails distributed over the summer and winter ranges of the Rivièreaux-Feuilles herd (RAF herd, east of Hudson Bay in northern Quebec). The age structure data of trampling scars from lichen woodlands distributed over the entire RAF range confirmed the overall trends of caribou activity from the late 1700s to present time. Over the last 200 years, the RAF herd has undergone two highs in the late 1700s and 1900s separated by a moderate activity pattern in the late 1800s. Native harvesting was possibly involved in the early 1900s decline, although at a moderate level. The reduced magnitude of caribou activity during this period has not modified the natural cycle of highs and lows, which suggests that other demographic factors were controlling the changing caribou abundance. Our data also show that only exceptionally large fires may have a minor, short-lived impact on caribou migrations but not on caribou numbers.
PubMed ID
15666677 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Mercury and selenium in wild mink (Mustela vision) from Norway]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51421
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1984 Jan-Feb;36(1-2):43-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
G. Norheim
T. Sivertsen
E M Brevik
A. Frøslie
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1984 Jan-Feb;36(1-2):43-8
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Nutrition
Animal Population Groups - metabolism
Animals
Animals, Wild - metabolism
English Abstract
Liver - analysis
Mercury - analysis
Methylmercury compounds - analysis
Mink - metabolism
Norway
Selenium - analysis
Abstract
Levels of mercury, methylmercuri and selenium were determined in liver samples from wild mink (Mustela vision) caught in the Norwegian countries of Rogaland (38 samples), Sogn og Fjordane (15 samples) and Hedmark (18 samples). The average mercury levels from these counties were 2.6, 3.1 and 2.1 micrograms Hg/g wet weight, respectively. No significant differences in mercury levels were found. The methyl mercury levels (MeHg) were determined in 30 samples. A very strong positive correlation between total mercury (Hg) and methyl mercury (r = 0.91, P less than 0.001) was found. The average methyl mercury level was 35 per cent of total mercury. This indicates that wild mink has the ability to demethylate mercury. The selenium levels were determined in 35 samples. A strong positive correlation between the levels of total mercury and selenium (r = 0.87, P less than 0.001) was found. There was no correlation between age or nutritional condition and mercury level. In the present study mink was examined to see of it could be recommended as an indicator species for monitoring the local environment for mercury contamination. No definite answer to this question could be found. The study did reveal, however, that in all the counties studied there are individuals that are considerably contaminated with mercury.
PubMed ID
6728672 View in PubMed
Less detail

Multiple sclerosis and exposure to solvents, ionizing radiation and animals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219752
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1993 Dec;19(6):399-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
A M Landtblom
U. Flodin
M. Karlsson
S. Pålhagen
O. Axelson
B. Söderfeldt
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1993 Dec;19(6):399-404
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animal Population Groups
Animals
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - etiology
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Radiation Injuries - etiology
Risk factors
Solvents - adverse effects
Sweden
Welding
Abstract
Earlier studies have indicated an association between multiple sclerosis and environmental factors, especially occupational exposure to solvents. The present study examined such relationships further. From medical files of hospitals in Kalmar and Jönköping, 91 cases of multiple sclerosis, diagnosed in 1983-1988, were identified from population registers corresponding to the catchment areas of the hospitals, and 348 referents were randomly drawn. The cases and referents answered a questionnaire concerning occupational exposure and animal contacts. The men had significantly elevated risks, determined from logistic odds ratios, for solvent exposure, occupational contact with dogs or cats, and leisure-time contact with caged birds. X-ray treatment and previous diseases were risk indicators among the women. For the men and women together, solvent exposure, radiological work, and previous diseases were associated with clearly elevated risks. Although the study concerned rather few subjects, the findings indicate that several exogenous factors might contribute to the development of multiple sclerosis.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1995 Apr;21(2):1507618061
PubMed ID
8153592 View in PubMed
Less detail

[On the fauna and ecology of blood-sucking mosquitoes in Dagestan].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109877
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1969 Nov-Dec;38(6):724-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sh I Ismailov
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1969 Nov-Dec;38(6):724-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altitude
Animal Population Groups
Animals
Culicidae
Ecology
Humans
Methods
Russia
PubMed ID
4392065 View in PubMed
Less detail

16 records – page 1 of 2.