Skip header and navigation

Refine By

51 records – page 1 of 6.

Activity of the pituitary-gonadal axis is increased prior to the onset of spawning migration of chum salmon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90768
Source
J Exp Biol. 2009 Jan;212(Pt 1):56-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Onuma Takeshi A
Sato Shunpei
Katsumata Hiroshi
Makino Keita
Hu Weiwei
Jodo Aya
Davis Nancy D
Dickey Jon T
Ban Masatoshi
Ando Hironori
Fukuwaka Masa-Aki
Azumaya Tomonori
Swanson Penny
Urano Akihisa
Author Affiliation
Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581, Japan. takeshikiai@msn.com
Source
J Exp Biol. 2009 Jan;212(Pt 1):56-70
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Animal Migration - physiology
Animals
DNA Primers - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Follicle Stimulating Hormone, beta Subunit - metabolism
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Gonads - metabolism - physiology
Haplotypes - genetics
Microarray Analysis
Oncorhynchus keta - physiology
Pacific Ocean
Pituitary Gland - metabolism - physiology
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
Radioimmunoassay
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Seasons
Sexual Behavior, Animal - physiology
Abstract
The activity of the pituitary-gonadal axis (PG axis) in pre-migratory and homing chum salmon was examined because endocrine mechanisms underlying the onset of spawning migration remain unknown. Pre-migratory fish were caught in the central Bering Sea in June, July and September 2001, 2002 and 2003, and in the Gulf of Alaska in February 2006. They were classified into immature and maturing adults on the basis of gonadal development. The maturing adults commenced spawning migration to coastal areas by the end of summer, because almost all fish in the Bering Sea were immature in September. In the pituitaries of maturing adults, the copy numbers of FSHbeta mRNA and the FSH content were 2.5- to 100-fold those of the immature fish. Similarly, the amounts of LHbeta mRNA and LH content in the maturing adults were 100- to 1000-fold those of immature fish. The plasma levels of testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone and estradiol were higher than 10 nmol l(-1) in maturing adults, but lower than 1.0 nmol l(-1) in immature fish. The increase in the activity of the PG-axis components had already initiated in the maturing adults while they were still in the Gulf of Alaska in winter. In the homing adults, the pituitary contents and the plasma levels of gonadotropins and plasma sex steroid hormones peaked during upstream migration from the coast to the natal hatchery. The present results thus indicate that the seasonal increase in the activity of the PG axis is an important endocrine event that is inseparable from initiation of spawning migration of chum salmon.
PubMed ID
19088211 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Advantages and limitations of interspecies associations in northern migratory sandpipers (Charadrii, Aves)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261289
Source
Zh Obshch Biol. 2014 May-Jun;75(3):204-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
V V Gavrilov
Source
Zh Obshch Biol. 2014 May-Jun;75(3):204-13
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Migration - physiology
Animals
Birds - physiology
Ecosystem
Female
Male
Nesting Behavior - physiology
Siberia
Abstract
Investigations were carried out at two stations of Ornithological Unit, IBPN FEB RAS, located in Nizhnekolymsk District, Yakutia, starting from May 15-20 in 1984, 1985, 1987, 1988, and 1990; at the northern coast of Pukhovoy Bay, Southern Island of Novaya Zemlya starting from June 1 in 1994; at Cape Beliy Nos, the Yugorsky Peninsula, starting from June 1 in 1995-1997. Classic associations are detected in interspecies flocks of sandpipers between the following species: the Pacific golden plover and the curlew sandpiper, the pectoral sandpiper and the long-billed dowitcher, the pectoral sandpiper and the dunlin, the grey plover and the dunlin. However, total amount of birds that form associations is not large. In species of group "A" (the grey plover, the Pacific golden plover, the pectoral sandpiper), no difference has been observed in migratory birds behavior within inter- or conspecific flocks. Species of group "B" (the dunlin, the curlew sandpiper, the long-billed dowitcher), on the contrary, change their behavior sharply depending on whether they belong to an association or not. Species of group "A" do not get any advantages when forming an association. Unlike them, species of group "B" profit from associating: a part of time spent in foraging substantially increases; more time is spent on rest and less time is spent on reconnaissance and vigilance (readiness for actions); safety of birds is enhanced. On the other hand, in species of group "B" there are also disadvantages related with associating: i.e., interspecies competition for food; foraging in suboptimal habitats which, in turn, may lead to notable increase of time spent by birds in foraging. An assumption is put forward that in species of group "B" advantages and limitations of associating cancel each other to a certain extent, and this explains rather small number of birds forming associations.
PubMed ID
25771678 View in PubMed
Less detail

An experimental field evaluation of winter carryover effects in semi-anadromous brown trout (Salmo trutta).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275036
Source
J Exp Zool A Ecol Genet Physiol. 2015 Nov;323(9):645-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Jonathan D Midwood
Martin H Larsen
Mikkel Boel
Kim Aarestrup
Steven J Cooke
Source
J Exp Zool A Ecol Genet Physiol. 2015 Nov;323(9):645-54
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Migration - physiology
Animals
Denmark
Hydrocortisone - pharmacology
Rivers
Seasons
Stress, Physiological
Survival Analysis
Trout - growth & development - physiology
Abstract
For semi-anadromous brown trout, the decision whether or not to smoltify and migrate to the sea is believed to be made at the end of the preceding summer in response to both local environmental conditions and individual physiological status. Stressors experienced during the fall may therefore influence their propensity to migrate as well as carry over into the winter resulting in mortality when fish face challenging environmental conditions. To evaluate this possibility, we artificially elevated cortisol levels in juvenile trout (via intracoelomic injection of cortisol in the fall) and used passive integrated transponder tags to compare their overwinter and spring survival, growth, and migration success relative to a control group. Results suggest that overwinter mortality is high for individuals in this population regardless of treatment. However, survival rates were 2.5 times lower for cortisol-treated fish and they experienced significantly greater loss in mass. In addition, less than half as many cortisol-treated individuals made it downstream to a stationary antenna over the winter and also during the spring migration compared to the control treatment. These results suggest that a fall stressor can reduce overwinter survival of juvenile brown trout, negatively impact growth of individuals that survive, and ultimately result in a reduction in the number of migratory trout. Carryover effects such as those documented here reveal the cryptic manner in which natural and anthropogenic stressors can influence fish populations. J. Exp. Zool. 323A: 645-654, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
PubMed ID
26381608 View in PubMed
Less detail

Animal navigation: northern exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83289
Source
Curr Biol. 2005 Sep 6;15(17):R653-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-6-2005
Author
Gould James L
Author Affiliation
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-1004, USA.
Source
Curr Biol. 2005 Sep 6;15(17):R653-5
Date
Sep-6-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Migration - physiology
Animals
Arctic Regions
Geography
Magnetics
Orientation - physiology
Sparrows - physiology
Abstract
A recent study has found that sparrows moved gradually east above the Arctic Circle completely altered their migration strategy after encountering the massive natural change in declination near the magnetic pole. This should not happen--or should it?
PubMed ID
16139193 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arctic avian predators synchronise their spring migration with the northern progression of snowmelt.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306076
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 04 29; 10(1):7220
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-29-2020
Author
Teja Curk
Ivan Pokrovsky
Nicolas Lecomte
Tomas Aarvak
David F Brinker
Kurt Burnham
Andreas Dietz
Andrew Dixon
Alastair Franke
Gilles Gauthier
Karl-Otto Jacobsen
Jeff Kidd
Stephen B Lewis
Ingar J Øien
Aleksandr Sokolov
Vasiliy Sokolov
Roar Solheim
Scott Weidensaul
Karen Wiebe
Martin Wikelski
Jean-François Therrien
Kamran Safi
Author Affiliation
Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior, Department of Migration, Am Obstberg 1, Radolfzell, 78315, Germany. tcurk@ab.mpg.de.
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 04 29; 10(1):7220
Date
04-29-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animal Migration - physiology
Animals
Arctic Regions
Falconiformes - physiology
Models, Biological
Population Dynamics
Seasons
Abstract
Migratory species display a range of migration patterns between irruptive (facultative) to regular (obligate), as a response to different predictability of resources. In the Arctic, snow directly influences resource availability. The causes and consequences of different migration patterns of migratory species as a response to the snow conditions remains however unexplored. Birds migrating to the Arctic are expected to follow the spring snowmelt to optimise their arrival time and select for snow-free areas to maximise prey encounter en-route. Based on large-scale movement data, we compared the migration patterns of three top predator species of the tundra in relation to the spatio-temporal dynamics of snow cover. The snowy owl, an irruptive migrant, the rough-legged buzzard, with an intermediary migration pattern, and the peregrine falcon as a regular migrant, all followed, as expected, the spring snowmelt during their migrations. However, the owl stayed ahead, the buzzard stayed on, and the falcon stayed behind the spatio-temporal peak in snowmelt. Although none of the species avoided snow-covered areas, they presumably used snow presence as a cue to time their arrival at their breeding grounds. We show the importance of environmental cues for species with different migration patterns.
Notes
ErratumIn: Sci Rep. 2020 Sep 17;10(1):15450 PMID 32943746
PubMed ID
32350286 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing the vulnerability of freshwater fishes to climate change in Newfoundland and Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300161
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(12):e0208182
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Hope O Olusanya
M van Zyll de Jong
Author Affiliation
Environmental Policy Institute, Memorial University Grenfell Campus, Corner Brook, Newfoundland and Labrador.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(12):e0208182
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animal Migration - physiology
Animals
Climate change
Conservation of Natural Resources
Decision Making
Ecological Parameter Monitoring - methods
Fishes - physiology
Fresh Water
Newfoundland and Labrador
Reproduction - physiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Freshwater fish populations are rapidly declining globally due to the impacts of rapid climate change and existing non-climatic anthropogenic stressors. In response to these drivers, freshwater fishes are responding by shifting their distribution range, altering the timing of migration and spawning and through demographic processes. By 2050, the mean daily air temperature is predicted to increase by 2 to 3 degrees C in insular Newfoundland and by 3 to 4 degrees C in Labrador. Mean daily precipitation is also projected to increase in all locations, with increased intensity projected for several regions. To mitigate negative consequences of these changes, managers require analytical approaches that describe the vulnerability of fish to climate change. To address this need, the current study adopts the National Marine Fisheries Service vulnerability assessment framework to characterize the vulnerability of freshwater fishes in Newfoundland and Labrador. Twelve vulnerability indicators were developed from an extensive literature review and applied to the assessment. Experts were solicited using an online questionnaire survey and scores for exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity were collated and analyzed to derive a final vulnerability score and rank for each species. The analysis showed one species to be of high-very high vulnerability, two species were highly vulnerable while four species were moderately vulnerable to climate change. The result provides insight into the factors that drive vulnerability of freshwater fishes in the region, this information is significant to decision-makers and other stakeholders engaged in managing freshwater fish resources in Newfoundland and Labrador.
PubMed ID
30507972 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association Mapping Based on a Common-Garden Migration Experiment Reveals Candidate Genes for Migration Tendency in Brown Trout.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310312
Source
G3 (Bethesda). 2019 09 04; 9(9):2887-2896
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-04-2019
Author
Alexandre Lemopoulos
Silva Uusi-Heikkilä
Pekka Hyvärinen
Nico Alioravainen
Jenni M Prokkola
Chris K Elvidge
Anti Vasemägi
Anssi Vainikka
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental and Biological Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland lemopoulos.alexandre@gmail.com.
Source
G3 (Bethesda). 2019 09 04; 9(9):2887-2896
Date
09-04-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animal Migration - physiology
Animals
Female
Finland
Genome-Wide Association Study
Male
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Salmonidae - genetics - physiology
Abstract
A better understanding of the environmental and genetic contribution to migratory behavior and the evolution of traits linked to migration is crucial for fish conservation and fisheries management. Up to date, a few genes with unequivocal influence on the adoption of alternative migration strategies have been identified in salmonids. Here, we used a common garden set-up to measure individual migration distances of generally highly polymorphic brown trout Salmo trutta from two populations. Fish from the assumedly resident population showed clearly shorter migration distances than the fish from the assumed migratory population at the ages of 2 and 3 years. By using two alternative analytical pipelines with 22186 and 18264 SNPs obtained through RAD-sequencing, we searched for associations between individual migration distance, and both called genotypes and genotype probabilities. None of the SNPs showed statistically significant individual effects on migration after correction for multiple testing. By choosing a less stringent threshold, defined as an overlap of the top 0.1% SNPs identified by the analytical pipelines, GAPIT and Angsd, we identified eight candidate genes that are potentially linked to individual migration distance. While our results demonstrate large individual and population level differences in migration distances, the detected genetic associations were weak suggesting that migration traits likely have multigenic control.
PubMed ID
31289024 View in PubMed
Less detail

Atlantic salmon and sea trout display synchronised smolt migration relative to linked environmental cues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306796
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 02 26; 10(1):3529
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-26-2020
Author
Alison C Harvey
Kevin A Glover
Vidar Wennevik
Øystein Skaala
Author Affiliation
Institute of Marine Research (IMR), Bergen, Norway. alison.harvey@hi.no.
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 02 26; 10(1):3529
Date
02-26-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animal Migration - physiology
Animals
Norway
Rivers
Salmo salar - physiology
Temperature
Trout - physiology
Abstract
Anadromous salmon and sea trout smolts face challenging migrations from freshwater to the marine environment characterised by high mortality. Therefore, the timing of smolt migration is likely to be critical for survival. Time-series comparing migration of Atlantic salmon and sea trout smolts in the same river, and their response to the same environmental cues, are scarce. Here, we analysed migration timing of ~41 000 Atlantic salmon and sea trout smolts over a 19-year period from the river Guddalselva, western Norway. Trout displayed a longer migration window in earlier years, which decreased over time to become more similar to the salmon migration window. On average, salmon migrated out of the river earlier than trout. Migration of both species was significantly influenced by river water temperature and water discharge, but their relative influence varied across the years. On average, body-length of smolts of both species overlapped, however, size differences were observed within the migration period and among the years. We conclude that salmon and trout smolts in this river are highly synchronised and migrate in response to the same range of linked environmental cues.
PubMed ID
32103141 View in PubMed
Less detail

Breeding latitude drives individual schedules in a trans-hemispheric migrant bird.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101923
Source
Nat Commun. 2010;1:67
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Jesse R Conklin
Phil F Battley
Murray A Potter
James W Fox
Author Affiliation
Ecology Group, Institute of Natural Resources, Massey University, Private Bag 11-222, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand. conklin.jesse@gmail.com
Source
Nat Commun. 2010;1:67
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Migration - physiology
Animals
Birds
Breeding
Ecosystem
New Zealand
United States
Abstract
Despite clear benefits of optimal arrival time on breeding grounds, migration schedules may vary with an individual bird's innate quality, non-breeding habitat or breeding destination. Here, we show that for the bar-tailed godwit (Limosa lapponica baueri), a shorebird that makes the longest known non-stop migratory flights of any bird, timing of migration for individual birds from a non-breeding site in New Zealand was strongly correlated with their specific breeding latitudes in Alaska, USA, a 16,000-18,000 km journey away. Furthermore, this variation carried over even to the southbound return migration, 6 months later, with birds returning to New Zealand in approximately the same order in which they departed. These tightly scheduled movements on a global scale suggest endogenously controlled routines, with breeding site as the primary driver of temporal variation throughout the annual cycle.
PubMed ID
20842198 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in the plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor-I from the onset of spawning migration through upstream migration in chum salmon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149698
Source
Gen Comp Endocrinol. 2010 Jan 15;165(2):237-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2010
Author
Takeshi A Onuma
Keita Makino
Hiroshi Katsumata
Brian R Beckman
Masatoshi Ban
Hironori Ando
Masa-aki Fukuwaka
Tomonori Azumaya
Penny Swanson
Akihisa Urano
Author Affiliation
Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581, Japan. takeshikiai@msn.com
Source
Gen Comp Endocrinol. 2010 Jan 15;165(2):237-43
Date
Jan-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Migration - physiology
Animals
Body Size
Gonads - metabolism
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - genetics - metabolism
Male
Oncorhynchus keta - blood - physiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Radioimmunoassay
Reproduction - physiology
Sexual Behavior, Animal - physiology
Abstract
An increase in activity of the pituitary-gonadal axis (PG-axis) and gonadal development are essential for the onset of spawning migration of chum salmon from the Bering Sea. In the Bering Sea, fish with larger body sizes initiated gonadal development and commenced spawning migration to the natal river by the end of summer. We thus hypothesized that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), a somatotropic signal that interacts with the PG-axis, can be one of such factors responsible for the onset of migration, and examined changes in plasma levels and hepatic expression of IGF-I gene in oceanic and homing chum salmon in 2001-2003. The plasma IGF-I levels and corresponding body sizes in maturing adults, which had developing gonads, were significantly higher than those in immature fish in all years examined. Such increase in the plasma IGF-I levels in maturing fish was observed even in the Gulf of Alaska during February 2006, while coincident increase was not observed in the hepatic amounts of IGF-I mRNA. In autumn, the plasma IGF-I levels in homing adults decreased during upstream migration in the Ishikari River-Ishikari bay water system in Hokkaido, Japan. In conclusion, the plasma IGF-I levels increased with gonadal development when chum salmon migrated from the winter Gulf of Alaska to the summer Bering Sea. Circulating IGF-I may interact with the PG-axis and promote gonadal development that is inseparable from the onset of spawning migration. Circulating IGF-I levels were thereafter lowered in accordance with final maturation during upstream migration in the breeding season.
PubMed ID
19595688 View in PubMed
Less detail

51 records – page 1 of 6.