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51 records – page 1 of 6.

Accumulation and depuration of the synthetic antioxidant ethoxyquin in the muscle of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86374
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2008 May;46(5):1834-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Bohne Victoria J Berdikova
Lundebye Anne-Katrine
Hamre Kristin
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), Nordnes, Bergen, Norway. victoria.bohne@nifes.no
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2008 May;46(5):1834-43
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Algorithms
Animal Feed - analysis
Animals
Antioxidants - metabolism
Body Weight - drug effects
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Diet
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethoxyquin - metabolism
Growth - drug effects
Humans
Lipids - analysis
Mice
Muscle, Skeletal - chemistry - metabolism
Norway
Salmo salar - metabolism
Abstract
The biological fate of the fish feed additive, ethoxyquin (EQ) was examined in the muscle of Atlantic salmon during 12 weeks of feeding followed by a 2 weeks depuration period. Parent EQ (1,2-dihydro-6-ethoxy-2,2,4-trimethylquinoline), quinone imine (2,6-dihydro-2,2,4-trimethyl-6-quinolone), de-ethylated EQ (6-hydroxy-2,2,4-trimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline) and EQDM (EQ dimer or 1,8'-di(1,2-dihydro-6-ethoxy-2,2,4-trimethyl-quinoline) were found to be the ubiquitous metabolites of dietary EQ, with EQDM as a main metabolite. A rapid decrease in the level of EQ (2.4 days of half-life) was balanced by an increase in EQDM, giving an unchanged net sum following 2 weeks of depuration. The mandatory 14 days depuration period prior to slaughtering of farmed salmon in Norway was not sufficient for complete elimination of EQ-derived residuals. Post depuration, EQDM accounted for 99% of sum of the two compounds in all treatment groups; possible toxicological effects of EQDM are not known. The individual concentrations of EQ and EQDM and their sum are dependent on EQ level in the feed, consequently, their residual concentrations may be controlled. The theoretical amount of EQ and EQDM consumed in one meal of farmed salmon would be under the recommended ADI, provided that the fish were raised on feed with no more than 150 mg EQ/kg feed, which is the EU maximum limit for EQ in fish feed.
PubMed ID
18329775 View in PubMed
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Source
Nord Vet Med. 1978 Nov;30(11):482-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1978
Author
H. Pettersson
B. Göransson
K H Kiessling
K. Tideman
T. Johansson
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1978 Nov;30(11):482-5
Date
Nov-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aflatoxins - analysis
Animal Feed - analysis - standards
Cereals - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
So far aflatoxin has not been detected in crops grown in Sweden but only in imported feedstuffs or in feed mixtures containing imported products. During the survey for other mycotoxins in Swedish crops a compound was detected in oats which, by further analysis, was identified as aflatoxin B1. Quantitative evaluation showed concentrations as high as 2.6 ppm. The fungal population in this highly contaminated sample consisted almost entirely of Aspergillus flavus.
PubMed ID
556541 View in PubMed
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[An evaluation of the efficacy of protective measures in the late period after the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204966
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 1998 May-Jun;38(3):354-66
Publication Type
Article
Author
S V Fesenko
N I Sanzharova
R M Aleksakhin
Author Affiliation
All-Russian Research Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Obninsk, Russia. acr@wdc.meteo.ru
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 1998 May-Jun;38(3):354-66
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Animal Feed - analysis - radiation effects
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Crops, Agricultural - chemistry - radiation effects
Humans
Power Plants
Radiation Protection - methods
Radioactive Hazard Release
Russia
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects
Ukraine
Abstract
Results from a comparative analysis of the efficiency of countermeasures in agriculture in a long term after the ChNPP accident are presented. Based on criteria such as reduction factor for 137Cs transfer to plants, averted dose and cost of 1 manSv relative ratings of countermeasures are given. Using one of the farms, located in the contaminated area as an example radiological justification of the optimal systems of countermeasures application is provided.
PubMed ID
9682728 View in PubMed
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Application of laws, policies, and guidance from the United States and Canada to the regulation of food and feed derived from genetically modified crops: interpretation of composition data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108631
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2013 Sep 4;61(35):8349-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-4-2013
Author
William D Price
Lynne Underhill
Author Affiliation
12818 Wolfsville Road, Smithsburg, Maryland 21783, United States.
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2013 Sep 4;61(35):8349-55
Date
Sep-4-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed - analysis
Canada
Food Analysis - methods
Food Safety - methods
Food, Genetically Modified
Humans
Legislation, Food
Nutrition Policy
Plants, Genetically Modified - chemistry
Risk assessment
United States
United States Food and Drug Administration
Abstract
With the development of recombinant DNA techniques for genetically modifying plants to exhibit beneficial traits, laws and regulations were adopted to ensure the safety of food and feed derived from such plants. This paper focuses on the regulation of genetically modified (GM) plants in Canada and the United States, with emphasis on the results of the compositional analysis routinely utilized as an indicator of possible unintended effects resulting from genetic modification. This work discusses the mandate of Health Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency as well as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approach to regulating food and feed derived from GM plants. This work also addresses how publications by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and Codex Alimentarius fit, particularly with defining the importance and purpose of compositional analysis. The importance of study design, selection of comparators, use of literature, and commercial variety reference values is also discussed.
PubMed ID
23865444 View in PubMed
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Application of short-lived radionuclides in neutron activation analysis of biological and environmental samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219543
Source
Biol Trace Elem Res. 1994;43-45:33-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
F. Grass
M. Bichler
J. Dorner
H. Holzner
A. Ritschel
A. Ramadan
G P Westphal
R. Gwozdz
Author Affiliation
Atominstitut, Vienna, Austria.
Source
Biol Trace Elem Res. 1994;43-45:33-46
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed - analysis
Environmental pollution - analysis
Half-Life
Humans
Iodine - analysis
Lichens - chemistry
Lithium - analysis
Neutron Activation Analysis - methods
Norway
Radioisotopes
Scandium - analysis
Seawater - analysis
Selenium Radioisotopes - analysis
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
The application of short-lived nuclides, especially in connection with the 6LiD-converter, in biological and environmental samples is demonstrated on I and Br determination in human urine, on I in pet food, and on the analysis of all the halogens in volcanic gases in a single activation. Trace element determination in lichens indicates polluted and unpolluted areas. The use of the .74-s 38mCl enables the rapid screening of great number of samples.
PubMed ID
7710845 View in PubMed
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Cadmium in food chain and health effects in sensitive population groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70790
Source
Biometals. 2004 Oct;17(5):531-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Agneta Oskarsson
Anna Widell
Ing-Marie Olsson
Kierstin Petersson Grawé
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden. A.Oskarsson@surrey.ac.uk
Source
Biometals. 2004 Oct;17(5):531-4
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed - analysis
Animals
Animals, Newborn
Behavior, Animal - drug effects
Cadmium - analysis - blood - toxicity - urine
Environmental Exposure
Female
Food analysis
Food chain
Humans
Kidney - chemistry
Lactation
Male
Meat - analysis
Rats
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Soil - analysis
Swine
Abstract
Even at the low exposure level of cadmium found in this study population living on farms in southern Sweden, there was an indication of effect on biochemical markers of renal function. Women had higher blood cadmium (BCd) and urinary cadmium (UCd) than men, which can be explained by higher absorption of Cd due to low iron status. In the present study, Cd in pig kidneys could not be used to predict human BCd or UCd even though cereals are a substantial part of both the human and the pig diet. The contribution of Cd from locally produced food to the total dietary intake in humans was relatively low and varied and the intake of Cd did not correlate with BCd or UCd. In contrast, Cd levels in pig kidney were significantly related to Cd levels in feed. However, there was no relationship between the locally produced cereals, constituting the main part of the feed, and Cd in pig kidneys. In pig feed, other non-locally produced ingredients contributed to a large part of the Cd in feed. The Cd in non-locally produced feed ingredients reaches the local circulation via excretion in faeces and application of manure to arable soils and will lead to increased levels in the crops. As indicated by experimental data from animals, neurochemical and neurobehavioral effects during development need to be further explored as sensitive endpoints for cadmium toxicity.
PubMed ID
15688858 View in PubMed
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Chemical characterization of 21 species of marine macroalgae common in Norwegian waters: benefits of and limitations to their potential use in food and feed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290664
Source
J Sci Food Agric. 2018 Mar; 98(5):2035-2042
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Irene Biancarosa
Ikram Belghit
Christian G Bruckner
Nina S Liland
Rune Waagbø
Heidi Amlund
Svenja Heesch
Erik-Jan Lock
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), Bergen, Norway.
Source
J Sci Food Agric. 2018 Mar; 98(5):2035-2042
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animal Feed - analysis
Food analysis
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Norway
Nutritive Value
Seaweed - chemistry - classification
Abstract
In the past few years, much effort has been invested into developing a new blue economy based on harvesting, cultivating and processing marine macroalgae in Norway. Macroalgae have high potential for a wide range of applications, e.g. as source of pharmaceuticals, production of biofuels or as food and feed. However, data on the chemical composition of macroalgae from Norwegian waters are scant. This study was designed to characterize the chemical composition of 21 algal species. Both macro- and micronutrients were analysed. Concentrations of heavy metals and the metalloid arsenic in the algae were also quantified.
The results confirm that marine macroalgae contain nutrients which are relevant for both human and animal nutrition, the concentrations whereof are highly dependent on species. Although heavy metals and arsenic were detected in the algae studied, concentrations were mostly below maximum allowed levels set by food and feed legislation in the EU.
This study provides chemical data on a wide range of algal species covering the three taxonomic groups (brown, red and green algae) and discusses both benefits of and potential limitations to their use for food and feed purposes. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29193189 View in PubMed
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Cs-137 concentration in reindeer and its fodder plants

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102069
Source
Science of the Total Environment. 1989 Sep;85:199-206
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1989
Author
Rissanen, K
Rahola, T
Source
Science of the Total Environment. 1989 Sep;85:199-206
Date
Sep-1989
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Animal Feed, analysis
Animals
Cesium Radioisotopes, analysis
Finland
Geography
Lichens, analysis
Nuclear Reactors
Plants, analysis
Radioactive fallout
Reindeer
Ukraine
Abstract
Radionuclides, especially the long-lived 137Cs (physical half-life 30 years), are accumulated efficiently in the northern, subarctic, lichen-reindeer-man foodchain. Until the Chernobyl accident the fallout nuclides studied originated from nuclear weapons tests. After this accident some fresh fallout was deposited in Finnish Lapland. Lichens grow very slowly and collect nutrients very efficiently from air, rain and snow. During winter the basic fodder plants for reindeer are lichens and some winter-green plants, shrubs and dry leaves. During the bare-ground season, the reindeer eat various grasses, herbs and leaves etc. Lichens constitute 30-50 per cent of the entire vegetable mass consumed by the reindeer in a year. The highest 137Cs-concentration 2500 Bq/kg dry weight was found in lichen in the middle of the 1960s. In 1985 the concentration had decreased to about 240 Bq/kg dry weight. After the Chernobyl accident the 137Cs-concentration in lichen varied from 200 to 2000 Bq/kg dry weight in Finnish Lapland. In reindeer fodder plant samples collected in the 1980s before the Chernobyl accident the 137Cs-concentration varied from 5 to 970 Bq/kg dry weight. The highest 137Cs-concentration in reindeer meat, about 2500 Bq/kg fresh weight, was found in 1965 and thereafter decreased to about 300 Bq/kg fresh weight in the winter before the Chernobyl accident. After the accident the mean 137Cs-concentration in reindeer meat from the 1986-87 slaughtering period was 720 Bq/kg fresh weight and in 1987-88, 630 Bq/kg fresh weight.
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Determination of exposure to aflatoxins among Danish workers in animal-feed production through the analysis of aflatoxin B1 adducts to serum albumin.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24668
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1991 Dec;17(6):436-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
J L Autrup
J. Schmidt
T. Seremet
H. Autrup
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Environmental Carcinogenesis, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1991 Dec;17(6):436-40
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aflatoxin B1 - adverse effects - pharmacokinetics
Animal Feed - analysis
DNA Damage
Dust - adverse effects - analysis
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Protein Binding
Abstract
Aflatoxin B1 is suspected as an etiologic factor in the increased risk for primary liver cancer among workers in animal-feed processing plants in Denmark. Aflatoxin bound to serum albumin was therefore measured for feed-processing workers. Blood samples were collected immediately after vacation and after four weeks of work, and aflatoxin was quantified by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Seven of 45 individuals with an estimated exposure of 64 ng aflatoxin B1.d-1.kg-1 body weight were positive. Three positive workers had been unloading a cargo with an aflatoxin B1 level of 26 micrograms.kg-1 raw material. The exposure level correlated well with the job titles. Dust samples collected at different sites showed considerable variation in the amount of aflatoxin B1 (nondetectable to 8 micrograms.kg-1 dust). The exposure to aflatoxin B1 may only partially explain the increased risk of liver cancer.
PubMed ID
1788537 View in PubMed
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51 records – page 1 of 6.