Skip header and navigation

Refine By

251 records – page 1 of 26.

Accumulation and depuration of okadaic acid esters in the European green crab (Carcinus maenas) during a feeding study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86837
Source
Toxicon. 2008 Mar 1;51(3):468-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2008
Author
Jørgensen Kevin
Cold Ulrik
Fischer Knud
Author Affiliation
National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Mørkhøj Bygade 19, 2860 Søborg, Denmark. kejo@food.dtu.dk
Source
Toxicon. 2008 Mar 1;51(3):468-72
Date
Mar-1-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed
Animals
Bivalvia - chemistry
Brachyura - chemistry - metabolism
Diet
Esters - chemistry - metabolism
Marine Toxins - metabolism
Muscle, Skeletal
Okadaic Acid - chemistry - metabolism
Shellfish - analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
Soft shell crab is a seafood delicacy in many parts of the world. In Denmark, it has been investigated whether a commercial production of soft shell European green crabs (Carcinus maenas) would be feasible. In relation to this, a feeding study was performed to examine if occurrence of DSP toxins in the product could be a food safety problem. The crabs were fed with mussels containing DSP toxins (2500 microg total okadaic acid equivalents/kg) for 17 days and then fasted for 19 days. The content of total okadaic acid equivalents in the digestive organs was on average 27 times higher than the corresponding content in the body meat. The highest level of total okadaic acid equivalents measured was 12 microg/kg in body meat and 503 microg/kg in digestive organs. The results show that the content of DSP toxins in a commercial product of soft shell European green crab (without digestive organs) could be regarded as negligible.
PubMed ID
17983637 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accumulation and depuration of the synthetic antioxidant ethoxyquin in the muscle of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86374
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2008 May;46(5):1834-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Bohne Victoria J Berdikova
Lundebye Anne-Katrine
Hamre Kristin
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES), Nordnes, Bergen, Norway. victoria.bohne@nifes.no
Source
Food Chem Toxicol. 2008 May;46(5):1834-43
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Algorithms
Animal Feed - analysis
Animals
Antioxidants - metabolism
Body Weight - drug effects
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Diet
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethoxyquin - metabolism
Growth - drug effects
Humans
Lipids - analysis
Mice
Muscle, Skeletal - chemistry - metabolism
Norway
Salmo salar - metabolism
Abstract
The biological fate of the fish feed additive, ethoxyquin (EQ) was examined in the muscle of Atlantic salmon during 12 weeks of feeding followed by a 2 weeks depuration period. Parent EQ (1,2-dihydro-6-ethoxy-2,2,4-trimethylquinoline), quinone imine (2,6-dihydro-2,2,4-trimethyl-6-quinolone), de-ethylated EQ (6-hydroxy-2,2,4-trimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline) and EQDM (EQ dimer or 1,8'-di(1,2-dihydro-6-ethoxy-2,2,4-trimethyl-quinoline) were found to be the ubiquitous metabolites of dietary EQ, with EQDM as a main metabolite. A rapid decrease in the level of EQ (2.4 days of half-life) was balanced by an increase in EQDM, giving an unchanged net sum following 2 weeks of depuration. The mandatory 14 days depuration period prior to slaughtering of farmed salmon in Norway was not sufficient for complete elimination of EQ-derived residuals. Post depuration, EQDM accounted for 99% of sum of the two compounds in all treatment groups; possible toxicological effects of EQDM are not known. The individual concentrations of EQ and EQDM and their sum are dependent on EQ level in the feed, consequently, their residual concentrations may be controlled. The theoretical amount of EQ and EQDM consumed in one meal of farmed salmon would be under the recommended ADI, provided that the fish were raised on feed with no more than 150 mg EQ/kg feed, which is the EU maximum limit for EQ in fish feed.
PubMed ID
18329775 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Acid mucopolysaccharide content in the skin, its structures and the wool of sheep depending on feeding]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62540
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1974 Nov-Dec;46(6):754-6
Publication Type
Article

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in lambs. Clinical and pathoanatomical investigations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60347
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1984 Mar-Apr;36(3-4):88-97
Publication Type
Article
Author
M J Ulvund
H. Grønstøl
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1984 Mar-Apr;36(3-4):88-97
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Animal Feed
Animals
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn - diagnosis - pathology - veterinary
Sheep
Sheep Diseases - diagnosis - pathology
Abstract
In the South-Western part of Norway, lambs of the Old Norwegian short tailed breed (Spael) and crosses with the Dala breed sometimes develop an Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) shortly after they have been moved onto lush aftermath grazings from mountain pastures. This article covers the symptoms and pathoanatomical findings in lambs affected with ARDS (Table I). The lambs acquired ARDS 18-72 hours after change of pasture. Heavy dysphne, frothing at the mouth, elevated temperature (greater than 41 degrees C), tachycardia, urination and ruminal atony were striking symptoms (Table II). In the early phase of the disease the lambs were often in a tranquil state, depressed, sometimes atactic, and it seemed that they went into the overt dysphneic phase on exposure to physical stress. Morbidity was 1.4%, mortality 36%. Post mortem findings included frothy contents in the airways, heavy congestion and oedema in the lungs which also had emphysematous areas, subepicardial petechiae, varying degree of mottling of the myocardium, and also varying degree of paleness and spottyness of renal cortices. The lungs showed extensive focal alveolar and interstitial emphysema, septal congestion, alveolar oedema, partial collapse, and accumulations of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in vascular beds. Later, fibrillar material was found in the alveoli, alveolar macrophages accumulated, and interalveolar septa thickened because of increased fibromuscular tissue and mononuclear cells (Fig. 1, A-D). Alveolar epithelial hyperplasia was not seen in any stage. Four lambs were moderately infected with lungworms (D. filaria), three in the prepatent, one in the patent phase. Histopathological changes in other organs included granular degenerations of myocardial threads, and development of a glomerulonephritis and focal interstitial nephritis (Fig. 1, E-F). This disease entity (ARDS) in lambs seems to be unknown in literature. The disease is compared with other known diseases in ruminants. Etiology is so far unknown. Possibilities of sudden ruminal histamine formation coinciding with a hypersensitivity reaction is discussed.
PubMed ID
6564510 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptation strategies of forage soybeans cultivated on acidic soils under cool climate to produce high quality forage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302007
Source
Plant Sci. 2019 Jun; 283:278-289
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2019
Author
Muhammad Nadeem
Thu Huong Pham
Ashley Nieuwenhuis
Waqas Ali
Muhammad Zaeem
Waqar Ashiq
Syed Shah Mohioudin Gillani
Charles Manful
Oludoyin Adeseun Adigun
Lakshman Galagedara
Mumtaz Cheema
Raymond Thomas
Author Affiliation
School of Science and the Environment, Grenfell Campus, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Corner Brook, A2H 5G4, Canada; Department of Environmental Sciences, COMSATS University of Islamabad, Vehari 61100, Pakistan. Electronic address: mnadeem@grenfell.mun.ca.
Source
Plant Sci. 2019 Jun; 283:278-289
Date
Jun-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Animal Feed
Climate
Crop Production - methods
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Newfoundland and Labrador
Plant Roots - growth & development - metabolism
Soil
Soybeans - growth & development - metabolism
Abstract
Boreal soils tend to be podzols characterized by acidic pH, which can further limit forage crop growth and production. It is unclear, how forage soybeans adopt to produce forage with high nutritional quality when cultivated on podzols in boreal climate. To answer this question, we cultivated forage soybeans on agricultural podzols at 3 farm sites with varied soil pH (6.8, 6.0 or 5.1), and assessed the root membrane lipidome remodeling response to such climatic conditions. Contrary to our expectations, significantly lower biomass was observed at pH 6.8 compared to 6.0 and 5.1. However, surprisingly the plants produced similar forage quality at 6.8 and 5.1?pH. Three major lipid classes including phospholipids, glycolipids and phytosterols were observed in roots irrespective of soil pH. Phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidic acid (PA), and acylated glucosyl betasitosterol ester (AGlcSiE) accounted for 95% of the root lipidome, and expressed significant changes in response to cultivation across the three soil pH levels. These lipids were also observed to have strong correlations with forage production, and forage quality. Therefore, soybean genotypes with higher abilities to remodel PC, PE, PA, and AGlcSiE could be better suited for producing higher quality forage in acid podzolic soils characteristics of boreal ecosystems.
PubMed ID
31128698 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1978 Nov;30(11):482-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1978
Author
H. Pettersson
B. Göransson
K H Kiessling
K. Tideman
T. Johansson
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1978 Nov;30(11):482-5
Date
Nov-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aflatoxins - analysis
Animal Feed - analysis - standards
Cereals - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
So far aflatoxin has not been detected in crops grown in Sweden but only in imported feedstuffs or in feed mixtures containing imported products. During the survey for other mycotoxins in Swedish crops a compound was detected in oats which, by further analysis, was identified as aflatoxin B1. Quantitative evaluation showed concentrations as high as 2.6 ppm. The fungal population in this highly contaminated sample consisted almost entirely of Aspergillus flavus.
PubMed ID
556541 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An evaluation of the efficacy of protective measures in the late period after the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204966
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 1998 May-Jun;38(3):354-66
Publication Type
Article
Author
S V Fesenko
N I Sanzharova
R M Aleksakhin
Author Affiliation
All-Russian Research Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Obninsk, Russia. acr@wdc.meteo.ru
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 1998 May-Jun;38(3):354-66
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Animal Feed - analysis - radiation effects
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Cesium Radioisotopes - analysis
Crops, Agricultural - chemistry - radiation effects
Humans
Power Plants
Radiation Protection - methods
Radioactive Hazard Release
Russia
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - adverse effects
Ukraine
Abstract
Results from a comparative analysis of the efficiency of countermeasures in agriculture in a long term after the ChNPP accident are presented. Based on criteria such as reduction factor for 137Cs transfer to plants, averted dose and cost of 1 manSv relative ratings of countermeasures are given. Using one of the farms, located in the contaminated area as an example radiological justification of the optimal systems of countermeasures application is provided.
PubMed ID
9682728 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Animal feeding and feed legislation after the detection of the first indigenous BSE cases in Germany].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188611
Source
Dtsch Tierarztl Wochenschr. 2002 Aug;109(8):362-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
J. Kamphues
Author Affiliation
Institut für Tierenährung, Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover.
Source
Dtsch Tierarztl Wochenschr. 2002 Aug;109(8):362-7
Date
Aug-2002
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed - adverse effects - analysis - standards
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Cattle
Disease Transmission, Infectious - veterinary
Disease Vectors
Encephalopathy, Bovine Spongiform - diagnosis - prevention & control
European Union
Food Contamination
Germany
Humans
Legislation, Food
Abstract
In Great Britain, even the earliest tangible signs indicating the epidemiologic significance of meat and bone meal in the spreading of BSE soon gave rise to increasingly rigorous legislative measures regulating animal feedstuffs. In 1994 a ban on the feeding of animal proteins to ruminants was implemented throughout the entire EU. But until the first BSE cases were actually confirmed in locally raised cattle (November 2000), feeding practice and legislation more or less in Germany remained unaffected by the efforts undertaken in Great Britain. This situation was suddenly changed on 1 December, 2000, when the so-called "Verfütterungsverbot" was put into effect, a law which drastically extended bans regarding the feedstuffs (including fishmeal and animal fats) as well as the species concerned (all animals used in food production). In 2001 the "contamination" phenomenon (ingredients of animal origin were detected in mixed feeds) became a vital issue for the feed industry; through the media, the subject "feedstuff safety" gained a previously unseen level of public awareness. Those circles concerned with mixed feed production and animal husbandry were increasingly confronted with the consequences of the "Verfütterungsverbot" (availability and pricing of substitute ingredients; the demand for amino acids and inorganic sources of phosphorus; problems finding adequate substitutes for animal fats; poor digestibility of alternative components such as indigenous legumes or vegetable fats in calf diets; lower utilization rate of original phosphorus in mixed feeds with negative consequences for skeletal development). With the conditional approval of fishmeal (except in feeds for ruminants) the situation has eased again to a certain degree; on the EU level there are increasing signals pointing toward a political intention to reinstate the utilization of by-products of slaughtered animals qualified for human consumption (with the exception of fallen/dead animals and specific risk material) in poultry and swine feeding. In Germany, at least, the question of animal fat utilization for food-producing animals is still unsolved.
PubMed ID
12224466 View in PubMed
Less detail

Animal health and environment in the production of fattening pigs. A study of disease incidence in relation to certain environmental factors, daily weight gain and carcass classification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14788
Source
Acta Vet Scand Suppl. 1974;(51):1-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974

251 records – page 1 of 26.