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264 records – page 1 of 27.

Additional records of the genus Colletes Latreille (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Colletidae) from Siberia, with a checklist of Russian species.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277703
Source
Zootaxa. 2015 Apr 28;3949(3):323-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-28-2015
Author
Maxim Yu Proshchalykin
Michael Kuhlmann
Source
Zootaxa. 2015 Apr 28;3949(3):323-44
Date
Apr-28-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animal Structures - anatomy & histology - growth & development
Animals
Bees - anatomy & histology - classification - growth & development
Body Size
Checklist
Female
Male
Organ Size
Russia
Siberia
Abstract
In addition to a previously published study about Siberian Colletes species, we here further report on poorly known species. Twenty six species are currently known from Siberia with C. cinerascens Morawitz 1893, C. kaszabi Kuhlmann 2002, and C. ebmeri Kuhlmann 2002 found in Russia for the first time and C. wacki Kuhlmann 2002 is newly recorded from the Asian part of Russia. The male of C. wacki is here described for the first time and a lectotype designated for the closely related C. conradti Noskiewicz 1936 to clarify the taxonomy of this group. Colletes uralensis Noskiewicz 1936 was erroneously recorded from Russia and is removed from the list of Russian species. Images and updated distribution maps are provided for the closely related C. kaszabi and C. uralensis as well as for C. conradti and C. wacki to facilitate their identification. An updated checklist of the 42 species of Colletes so far known from Russia is provided.
PubMed ID
25947811 View in PubMed
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Additional records of the genus Hylaeus Fabricius, 1793 (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Colletidae) from Siberia, with description of a new species.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280417
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 Apr 21;4105(4):301-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-21-2016
Author
Maxim Yu Proshchalykin
Holger H Dathe
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 Apr 21;4105(4):301-20
Date
Apr-21-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animal Structures - anatomy & histology - growth & development
Animals
Bees - anatomy & histology - classification - growth & development
Body Size
Ecosystem
Female
Male
Mongolia
Organ Size
Russia
Siberia
Abstract
As a supplement to a previously published study on Siberian Hylaeus species, we here report further records of twenty six rarely collected and little known species. Thirty two species are currently known from Siberia, including Hylaeus dorni Dathe, 1986, H. gredleri Förster, 1871, H. hungaricus (Alfken, 1905), H. moricei (Friese, 1898), H. nimbatus Dathe, 1986, H. oehlkei Dathe, 2010 and H. stubbei Dathe, 1986, which are reported from Russia for the first time, and H. brevicornis Nylander, 1852, H. communis Nylander, 1852, H. pfankuchi (Alfken, 1919) and H. styriacus Förster, 1871, which are newly recorded from Siberia. Hylaeus (Hylaeus) pesenkoi Proshchalykin & Dathe, sp. nov. is described as new from Siberia (Altai Republic and Tyva Republic) and neighbouring Mongolia (Khovd and Govi-Altai Aimags). The females of H. dorni Dathe, 1986 and H. oehlkei Dathe, 2010 are described for the first time; H. peregrinus Dathe, 1986 was recognised as the female of H. stubbei Dathe, 1986 and is treated as a new synonym.
PubMed ID
27394781 View in PubMed
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Aerial surveys cause large but ephemeral decreases in bear presence at salmon streams in Kodiak, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309083
Source
PLoS One. 2019; 14(9):e0222085
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
2019
Author
William W Deacy
William B Leacock
Eric J Ward
Jonathan B Armstrong
Author Affiliation
Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, United States of America.
Source
PLoS One. 2019; 14(9):e0222085
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Animal Distribution
Animals
Biomass
Ecosystem
Female
Male
Remote Sensing Technology - adverse effects - methods - standards
Rivers
Salmon - physiology
Ursidae - physiology
Abstract
Aerial surveys are often used to monitor wildlife and fish populations, but rarely are the effects on animal behavior documented. For over 30 years, the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge has conducted low-altitude aerial surveys to assess Kodiak brown bear (Ursus arctos middendorffi) space use and demographic composition when bears are seasonally congregated near salmon spawning streams in southwestern Kodiak Island, Alaska. Salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) are an important bear food and salmon runs are brief, so decreases in time spent fishing for salmon may reduce salmon consumption by bears. The goal of this study was to apply different and complementary field methods to evaluate the response of bears to these aerial surveys. Ground-based counts at one stream indicated 62% of bears departed the 200m-wide survey zone in response to aerial surveys, but bear counts returned to pre-survey abundance after only three hours. Although this effect was brief, survey flights occurred during the hours of peak daily bear activity (morning and evening), so the three-hour disruption appeared to result in a 25% decline in cumulative daily detections by 38 time-lapse cameras deployed along 10 salmon streams. Bear responses varied by sex-male bears were much more likely than female bears (with or without cubs) to depart streams and female bears with GPS collars did not move from streams following surveys. Although bears displaced by aerial surveys may consume fewer salmon, the actual effect on their fitness depends on whether they compensate by foraging at other times or by switching to other nutritious resources. Data from complementary sources allows managers to more robustly understand the impacts of surveys and whether their benefits are justified. Similar assessments should be made on alternative techniques such as Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and non-invasive sampling to determine whether they supply equivalent data while limiting bear disturbance.
PubMed ID
31504063 View in PubMed
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All stages of the Palaearctic predaceous midge Palpomyia schmidti Goetghebuer, 1934 (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280986
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 Jul 08;4137(1):85-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-08-2016
Author
Ryszard Szadziewski
Larisa V Golovatyuk
Elzbieta Sontag
Aleksandra Urbanek
Tatiana D Zinchenko
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 Jul 08;4137(1):85-94
Date
Jul-08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animal Structures - anatomy & histology - growth & development
Animals
Body Size
Ceratopogonidae - anatomy & histology - classification - growth & development
Female
Larva - anatomy & histology - classification - growth & development
Male
Organ Size
Pupa - anatomy & histology - classification - growth & development
Russia
Abstract
All stages and the ecology of the Southern Palaearctic Palpomyia schmidti collected from the vicinity of the saline Lake Elton in Russia are described and illustrated. The morphology of larvae and pupae as well as the detailed ecology of the larvae are described for the first time. P. schmidti is a halobiontic biting midge, widely distributed in the steppes and deserts of the Palaearctic region. It is proposed that the Palpomyia schmidti group should include five Holarctic species. P. downesi Grogan & Wirth, 1979 from north-western North America is recognized as a new junior synonym of the Eastern Palaearctic P. tuvae Remm, 1972. New synonymy.
PubMed ID
27395743 View in PubMed
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An annotated catalogue of the gamasid mites associated with small mammals in Asiatic Russia. The family Haemogamasidae (Acari: Mesostigmata: Gamasina).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284851
Source
Zootaxa. 2017 Jun 01;4273(1):1-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-01-2017
Author
Maxim V Vinarski
Natalia P Korallo-Vinarskaya
Source
Zootaxa. 2017 Jun 01;4273(1):1-18
Date
Jun-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animals
Ecosystem
Mammals
Mites
Russia
Abstract
We provide a list of the species of the family Haemogamasidae Oudemans, 1926 living in Asiatic Russia, with data on their synonymy, distribution, and relationships with mammal hosts. In total, 23 species of mites distributed between two genera (Eulaelaps Berlese, 1903, and Haemogamasus Berlese, 1889) are covered.
PubMed ID
28610258 View in PubMed
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An annotated catalogue of the gamasid mites associated with small mammals in Asiatic Russia. The family Laelapidae s. str. (Acari: Mesostigmata: Gamasina).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280823
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 May 16;4111(3):223-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-16-2016
Author
Maxim V Vinarski
Natalia P Korallo-Vinarskaya
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 May 16;4111(3):223-45
Date
May-16-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animal Structures - anatomy & histology - growth & development
Animals
Body Size
Catalogs as Topic
Ecosystem
Female
Male
Mammals - parasitology
Mites - anatomy & histology - classification - growth & development
Organ Size
Russia
Abstract
Twenty-nine species of mites of the family Laelapidae s. str. have been recorded as associated with small mammals (rodents, insectivores) in Asiatic Russia (Siberia and the Russian Far East). These species belong to two subfamilies (Laelapinae, Myonyssinae) and six genera: Androlaelaps Berlese, 1903, Dipolaelaps Zemskaya & Piontkovskaya, 1960, Laelaps C.L. Koch, 1836, Hyperlaelaps Zakhvatkin, 1948, Myonyssus Tiraboschi, 1904, Oryctolaelaps Lange, 1955. A list of the species, with data on synonymy, geographic ranges, and relationships with mammal hosts is provided. Some considerations concerning patterns of distribution of the parasitic Laelaptidae of Asiatic Russia are presented as well as their classifications from the point of view of known host association records.
PubMed ID
27395087 View in PubMed
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Ancistrocerus waldenii waldenii (Viereck 1906) (Hymenoptera: Vespidae, Eumeninae), a new addition to the fauna of Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273766
Source
Zootaxa. 2014;3838(1):143-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Emma Wahlberg
Guilherme C Baião
Sibylle Häggqvist
Svante Martinsson
Dario Pistone
Thomas Pape
Source
Zootaxa. 2014;3838(1):143-50
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animal Structures - anatomy & histology - growth & development
Animals
Body Size
Ecosystem
Female
Greenland
Male
Wasps - anatomy & histology - classification - growth & development
Abstract
Ancistrocerus waldenii waldenii (Viereck 1906) is newly recorded from West Greenland. This is a new northern limit for the species.
PubMed ID
25081765 View in PubMed
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An Inventory of Tortricidae (Lepidoptera) from the Rostov-on-Don province of Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274997
Source
Zootaxa. 2015;4048(4):538-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Alexander N Poltavsky
Source
Zootaxa. 2015;4048(4):538-52
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animal Structures - anatomy & histology - growth & development
Animals
Body Size
Ecosystem
Female
Male
Moths - anatomy & histology - classification - growth & development
Organ Size
Russia
Abstract
Records of leafroller moths (Tortricidae) from the Rostov-on-Don province of southern Russia are presented based on 10 years of field work (2005-2014). The list includes 91 species from 43 collecting sites; 80 species are recorded from the region for the first time. Compared to other well-surveyed, adjacent areas, the tortricid fauna is considerably more depauperate, and this may be explained in part by the predominance of steppe vegetation.
PubMed ID
26624766 View in PubMed
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Annotated zoogeography of non-marine Tardigrada. Part III: North America and Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282253
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 Dec 01;4203(1):zootaxa.4203.1.1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-01-2016
Author
Lukasz Kaczmarek
Lukasz Michalczyk
Sandra J McInnes
Source
Zootaxa. 2016 Dec 01;4203(1):zootaxa.4203.1.1
Date
Dec-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animals
Canada
Ecosystem
Greenland
Tardigrada - physiology
United States
Abstract
This paper is the third monograph of the series that describes the global records of limno-terrestrial water bears (Tardigrada). Here, we provide a comprehensive list of non-marine tardigrades recorded from the North America, providing an updated and revised taxonomy accompanied by geographic co-ordinates, habitat, and biogeographic comments. It is hoped this work will serve as a reference point and background for further zoogeographical and taxonomical studies.
PubMed ID
27988614 View in PubMed
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Anopheles daciae, a new country record for Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307169
Source
Med Vet Entomol. 2020 06; 34(2):145-150
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2020
Author
C L Culverwell
O P Vapalahti
R E Harbach
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Med Vet Entomol. 2020 06; 34(2):145-150
Date
06-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animal Distribution
Animals
Anopheles - growth & development - physiology
Finland
Larva
Ovum
Pupa
Abstract
Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) were collected throughout Finland between 2013 and 2018 to determine species distributions. During the course of molecular identifications of specimens belonging to the Anopheles maculipennis complex, ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 sequences and link-reared specimens revealed the presence of Anopheles daciae Linton, Nicolescu & Harbach (n = 37), a new country record, as well as Anopheles messeae Falleroni (n = 19) in the collections. Although the sample size is low, distinctions are apparent in the distributions of these two species, with An. daciae present in south-eastern and central Finland, including the regions of Kanta-Häme, Pirkanmaa, Pohjois-Pohjanmaa, Päijät-Häme and Satakunta, and An. messeae present in the southern and south-eastern regions of Åland (Ahvenanmaa), Etelä-Savo, Kanta-Häme, Kymenlaakso, Päijät-Häme, Satakunta, Uusimaa and Varsinais-Suomi. All reports of An. messeae in Finland prior to 2018 should therefore be recognized as potentially being either An. messeae or An. daciae. Because these species are potential vectors of malarial protozoa, it is important to have full knowledge of their distributions across Europe, particularly in the face of climate warming.
PubMed ID
31984558 View in PubMed
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264 records – page 1 of 27.