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Aberrant circulating levels of purinergic signaling markers are associated with several key aspects of peripheral atherosclerosis and thrombosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263533
Source
Circ Res. 2015 Mar 27;116(7):1206-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-27-2015
Author
Juho Jalkanen
Gennady G Yegutkin
Maija Hollmén
Kristiina Aalto
Tuomas Kiviniemi
Veikko Salomaa
Sirpa Jalkanen
Harri Hakovirta
Source
Circ Res. 2015 Mar 27;116(7):1206-15
Date
Mar-27-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
5'-Nucleotidase - blood
Adenosine Diphosphate - blood
Adenosine Triphosphate - blood
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Anoxia - blood
Antigens, CD - blood
Apyrase - blood
Artifacts
Atherosclerosis - blood - epidemiology
Biological Markers
Chronic Disease
Comorbidity
Disease Progression
Drug Utilization
Female
Finland - epidemiology
GPI-Linked Proteins - blood
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Hypertension - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Cardiovascular
Peripheral Arterial Disease - blood - epidemiology
Purinergic P2Y Receptor Antagonists - therapeutic use
Risk factors
Second Messenger Systems
Smoking - adverse effects - blood - epidemiology
Thrombophilia - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Purinergic signaling plays an important role in inflammation and vascular integrity, but little is known about purinergic mechanisms during the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in humans.
The objective of this study is to study markers of purinergic signaling in a cohort of patients with peripheral artery disease.
Plasma ATP and ADP levels and serum nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (NTPDase1/CD39) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 activities were measured in 226 patients with stable peripheral artery disease admitted for nonurgent invasive imaging and treatment. The major findings were that ATP, ADP, and CD73 values were higher in atherosclerotic patients than in controls without clinically evident peripheral artery disease (P
PubMed ID
25645301 View in PubMed
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Absence of sex differences in pharmacotherapy for acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179138
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jul;20(9):899-905
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Susan E Jelinski
William A Ghali
Gerry A Parsons
Colleen J Maxwell
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jul;20(9):899-905
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Aspirin - therapeutic use
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Drug Evaluation
Drug Therapy
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy
Patient Admission
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Sex Factors
Urban health
Abstract
Previous studies have indicated that sex differences may exist in the pharmacological management of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), with female patients being treated less aggressively.
To determine if previously reported sex differences in AMI medication use were also evident among all AMI patients treated at hospitals in an urban Canadian city.
All patients who had a primary discharge diagnosis of AMI from all three adult care hospitals in Calgary, Alberta, in the 1998/1999 fiscal year were identified from hospital administrative records (n=914). A standardized, detailed chart review was conducted. Information collected from the medical charts included sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, comorbid conditions, and cardiovascular medication use during hospitalization and at discharge.
Similar proportions of female and male patients were treated with thrombolytics, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, nitrate, heparin, diuretics and digoxin. Among patients aged 75 years and over, a smaller proportion of female patients received acetylsalicylic acid in hospital than did male patients (87% versus 95%; P=0.026). Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that, after correction for age, use of other anticoagulants/antiplatelets and death within 24 h of admission, sex was no longer an independent predictor for receipt of acetylsalicylic acid in hospital. Medications prescribed at discharge were similar between male and female patients.
The results from this Canadian chart review study, derived from detailed clinical data, indicate that the pattern of pharmacological treatment of female and male AMI patients during hospitalization and at discharge was very similar. No sex differences were evident in the treatment of AMI among patients treated in an urban Canadian centre.
PubMed ID
15266360 View in PubMed
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[A comparative study of the hemodynamic and antioxidant effects of Capoten and prazosin in patients with refractory heart failure]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54537
Source
Lik Sprava. 1997 Mar-Apr;(2):72-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
R O Sabadyshyn
B I Rudyk
N H Blinova
O Ia Slipak
Source
Lik Sprava. 1997 Mar-Apr;(2):72-6
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Antioxidants - therapeutic use
Captopril - therapeutic use
Cardiomyopathy, Dilated - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Drug Evaluation
English Abstract
Female
Heart Failure, Congestive - drug therapy - etiology - physiopathology
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Lipid Peroxidation - drug effects
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Prazosin - therapeutic use
Abstract
Overall fifty one patients with chronic cardiac insufficiency (ChCI) were studied for changes in parameters characterizing hemodynamics and lipid peroxidation (LPO) under treatment with kapoten and prazosin. Kapoten was found to be capable of exerting an antioxidant effect and working in ways beneficial for the pulmonary circulation, while prazosin is generally indicated to patients with ChCI presenting with increased end diastolic pressure in the left ventricle. Prazosin activates LPO, for which reason its pro-oxidant action needs to be drug-corrected. Because of marked pharmacologic effects of both drugs in dealing with refractory circulatory insufficiency it is advisable that further studies be made in order that we might be able to determine indications for kapoten and prazosin therapy in coronary patients as well as those with arterial hypertension, cardiomyopathies, valvular defects, ChCI with complications more accurately.
PubMed ID
9333490 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction in Alberta: temporal changes in outcomes, 1994 to 1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181191
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Feb;20(2):213-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Hude Quan
Bibiana Cujec
Yan Jin
David Johnson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Centre for Health and Policy Studies, University of Calgary, Quality Improvement and Health Information, Calgary Health Region, Alberta. hquan@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Feb;20(2):213-9
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Bypass
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Incidence
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Patient Readmission
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The current survival trends in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are not known. A population-based study using administrative data to examine the short and long term survival of patients after AMI in Alberta between 1994 and 1999 was conducted.
AMI patients were identified from hospital discharge data. Temporal changes in the adjusted (age, sex, AMI anatomical location and comorbidities) fatality rate were analyzed in 19,928 AMI patients.
The age- and sex-adjusted incidence of hospitalization for AMI in Alberta significantly declined from 169.6 per 100,000 population in 1994 to 160.8 per 100,000 in 1999 (P=0.03). The risk-adjusted in-hospital case fatality rate from all causes was 11.4% (95% CI 10.6% to 12.3%) in 1994 versus 9.2% (8.4% to 10.1%) in 1999; the 30-day case fatality rate was 12.6% (11.7% to 13.6%) in 1994 versus 10.1% (9.1% to 11.0%) in 1999; and the one-year case fatality rate was 19.0% (17.8% to 20.1%) in 1994 versus 14.9% (13.8% to 16.0%) in 1999. The percentage of hospitalized AMI patients who underwent coronary angiography within one year after admission rose from 48.2% in 1994 to 52.4% in 1999; percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty increased from 25.5% to 35.0% and coronary artery bypass surgery increased from 9.7% to 12.6%. Prescriptions for pharmacological drugs at discharge increased from 1994 to 1999 among patients aged 65 and older: from 29.5% in 1994 to 41.0% in 1999 for beta-blockers, from 5.2% to 18.7% for lipid lowering agents and from 14.0% to 20.5% for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.
There was a modest improvement in patient survival after AMI between 1994 and 1999. The improvements may be associated with increasing use of revascularization and pharmacological therapy provided in the management of AMI.
PubMed ID
15010746 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction in Canada: improvement with time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197737
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Jul 11;163(1):41-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-11-2000
Author
A. Dodek
Author Affiliation
Cardiac Catheterization Laboratories, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC.
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Jul 11;163(1):41-2
Date
Jul-11-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Databases as Topic
Humans
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Myocardial Infarction - therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Quebec
Survival Rate
Thrombolytic Therapy
Treatment Outcome
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1994 Oct 27;331(17):1130-57935638
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Aug 26;341(9):625-3410460813
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1998 Aug;32(2):360-79708461
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Nov 4;341(19):1413-910547403
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1999 Nov 1;34(5):1388-9410551683
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Jul 11;163(1):31-610920727
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 Mar 18;328(11):779-848123063
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 1999 Oct;15(10):1095-10210523476
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 1995 Jun;11(6):477-867780868
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1996 Oct 3;335(14):1001-98801446
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1996 Oct 17;335(16):1198-2058815943
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1996 Dec 19;335(25):1888-968948565
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1997 Jun 1;79(11):1441-69185630
Comment In: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 6;164(3):323-411232128
Comment In: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 6;164(3):323; author reply 32411232129
Comment On: CMAJ. 2000 Jul 11;163(1):31-610920727
PubMed ID
10920730 View in PubMed
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Acute treatment of myocardial infarction in Canada 1999-2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176049
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Feb;21(2):145-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Cynthia A Jackevicius
David Alter
Jafna Cox
Paul Daly
Shaun Goodman
Woganee Filate
Alice Newman
Jack V Tu
Author Affiliation
Pharmacy Department, University Health Network-Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4. Cynthia.Jackevicius@uhn.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Feb;21(2):145-52
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - contraindications - therapeutic use
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - therapy
Myocardial Reperfusion - utilization
Patient Discharge
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
Therapy for management of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) varies according to patient, prescriber and geographical characteristics.
To describe the in-hospital use of reperfusion therapy for ST elevation MI (STEMI) and discharge use of acetylsalicylic acid, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and statins in patients presenting with either STEMI or non-STEMI in Canada from 1999 to 2002.
Four Canadian registries (FASTRAK II, Canadian Acute Coronary Syndromes, Enhanced Feedback for Effective Cardiac Treatment and Improving Cardiovascular Outcomes in Nova Scotia) were used to identify patients with AMI in Canada and to measure in-hospital reperfusion and medication use. Use rates were compared by age, sex, time period and geographical area, according to available data.
Use rates for reperfusion in STEMI patients ranged from 60% to 70%, primarily representing fibrinolytic therapy. A delay in presentation to hospital after symptom onset represented an impediment to timely therapy, which was particularly pronounced for women and elderly patients. Overall, less than 50% of patients met the door-to-needle target of less than 30 min. Medication use rates at discharge increased from 1999/2000 to 2000/2001 across the different data sources: acetylsalicylic acid, 83% to 88%; beta-blockers, 74% to 89%; ACEIs, 54% to 67%; statins, 41% to 53%; and calcium antagonists, 21% to 32%.
Canadian and provincial rates of use of evidence-based medications for the treatment of AMI have increased over time, although there remains room for improvement. A single, comprehensive data source would supply better insights into the management of AMI in Canada.
PubMed ID
15729413 View in PubMed
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Adherence to statins, beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors following a first cardiovascular event: a retrospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174577
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 May 1;21(6):485-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2005
Author
David F Blackburn
Roy T Dobson
James L Blackburn
Thomas W Wilson
Mary Rose Stang
William M Semchuk
Author Affiliation
College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. d.blackburn@usask.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 May 1;21(6):485-8
Date
May-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Age Factors
Angina, Unstable - drug therapy
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass
Databases as Topic
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Saskatchewan
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Abstract
Population studies of statin adherence are generally restricted to one to two years of follow-up and do not analyze adherence to other drugs.
To report long-term adherence rates for statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and beta-blockers in patients who recently experienced a first cardiovascular event.
Linked administrative databases in the province of Saskatchewan were used in this retrospective cohort study. Eligible patients received a new statin prescription within one year of their first cardiovascular event between 1994 and 2001. Adherence to statins, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors was assessed from the first statin prescription to a subsequent cardiovascular event.
Of 1221 eligible patients, the proportion of patients adherent to statin medications dropped to 60.3% at one year and 48.8% at five years. The decline in the proportion of adherent patients was most notable during the first two years (100% to 53.7%). Several factors were associated with statin adherence, including age (P = 0.012), number of physician service days (P = 0.037), chronic disease score (P = 0.032), beta-blocker adherence (P
PubMed ID
15917876 View in PubMed
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Age and gender biases in secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in a Finnish university hospital setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161542
Source
Clin Drug Investig. 2007;27(10):673-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Sanna-Maria Michou
Mika Kähönen
Terho Lehtimäki
Kjell Nikus
Jari Viik
Kari Niemelä
Janne Kallio
Rami Lehtinen
Tiit Kööbi
Väinö Turjanmaa
Tuomo Nieminen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacological Sciences, Medical School, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Clin Drug Investig. 2007;27(10):673-81
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Aspirin - therapeutic use
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Exercise Test
Female
Finland
Hospitals, University
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - complications
Hypertension - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking
Abstract
Several studies have shown that treatment of coronary heart disease (CHD) does not meet the goals set in recommendations. The aim of this study was to investigate the adequacy of CHD drug treatment and secondary prevention measures, particularly with respect to age and gender biases, in a Finnish university hospital setting.
The participant pool consisted of patients in FINCAVAS (Finnish Cardiovascular Study), which is a cohort study recruiting consecutive patients performing a clinical exercise test at Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. 802 patients (581 men, 221 women) with a prior diagnosis of CHD recruited between October 2001 and December 2004 were included in the analysis.
Only roughly 12% of both men and women had an optimal risk factor profile. High blood pressure and hypercholesterolaemia were more common in women than in men, whereas smoking was more frequent among men. Men used ACE inhibitors (32.9% vs 20.4%, respectively), beta-adrenoceptor antagonists (80.8% vs 68.3%, respectively) and aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) [69.7% vs 58.8%, respectively] more frequently than women, but the frequency of use of these medications was also not at the recommended levels in men. Risk factor control is poorer in older than younger age groups.
CHD patients, particularly women, who performed an exercise stress test in a university hospital are suboptimally treated.
PubMed ID
17803342 View in PubMed
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Age- and gender-related differences in the use of secondary medical prevention after primary vascular surgery: a nationwide follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127996
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2012 Mar;43(3):300-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
A. Høgh
J S Lindholt
H. Nielsen
L P Jensen
S P Johnsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Vascular Surgery, Regionshospitalet Viborg, Denmark. a_l_hogh@yahoo.dk
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2012 Mar;43(3):300-7
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - surgery
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Peripheral Arterial Disease - epidemiology - prevention & control
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Secondary Prevention - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Vascular Surgical Procedures - utilization
Abstract
This study examined the possible age- and gender-related differences in the use of secondary medical prevention following primary vascular reconstruction in a population-based long-term follow-up study.
Using information from nationwide Danish registers, we identified all patients undergoing primary vascular reconstruction in-between 1996 and 2006 (n = 20,761). Data were obtained on all filled prescriptions 6 months and 3, 5 and 10 years after primary vascular reconstruction. Comparisons were made across age and gender groups, using men 40-60 years old as a reference.
Compared to current guidelines the overall use of secondary medical prevention was moderate to low (e.g., lipid-lowering drugs 49.5%, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ACE/ATII) 43.4%, combination of lipid-lowering drugs and anti-platelet therapy and any anti-hypertensive therapy 44.7%). A decline was observed between 6 months and 3 years after surgery. Patients >80 years old were less likely to be prescribed lipid-lowering drugs and combination therapy (e.g.: adjusted risk ratio (RR) 5 years after surgery for men and women 0.63 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.39-1.02) and 0.48 (95%CI: 0.31-0.75), respectively, whereas smaller and statistical non-significant gender-related differences were observed. The age- and gender-related differences appeared eliminated or substantially reduced in the latest part of the study period (2001-2007).
We found moderate to low use of secondary medical prevention in Denmark compared with recommendations from clinical guidelines. However, the use has increased in recent years and age- and gender-related differences have been reduced or even eliminated.
PubMed ID
22244910 View in PubMed
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217 records – page 1 of 22.