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2-year clinical outcomes after implantation of sirolimus-eluting, paclitaxel-eluting, and bare-metal coronary stents: results from the WDHR (Western Denmark Heart Registry).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89935
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):658-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-2009
Author
Kaltoft Anne
Jensen Lisette Okkels
Maeng Michael
Tilsted Hans Henrik
Thayssen Per
Bøttcher Morten
Lassen Jens Flensted
Krusell Lars Romer
Rasmussen Klaus
Hansen Knud Nørregaard
Pedersen Lars
Johnsen Søren Paaske
Sørensen Henrik Toft
Thuesen Leif
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. annekaltoft@stofanet.dk
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):658-64
Date
Feb-24-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Coronary Disease - mortality - therapy
Drug-Eluting Stents - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Paclitaxel
Sirolimus
Stents - adverse effects
Thrombosis - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This registry study assessed the safety and efficacy of the 2 types of drug-eluting stents (DES), sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) and paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES), compared with bare-metal stents (BMS). BACKGROUND: Drug-eluting stents may increase the risk of stent thrombosis (ST), myocardial infarction (MI), and death. METHODS: A total of 12,395 consecutive patients with coronary intervention and stent implantation recorded in the Western Denmark Heart Registry from January 2002 through June 2005 were followed up for 2 years. Data on death and MI were ascertained from national medical databases. We used Cox regression analysis to control for confounding. RESULTS: The 2-year incidence of definite ST was 0.64% in BMS patients, 0.79% in DES patients (adjusted relative risk [RR]: 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.72 to 1.65), 0.50% in SES patients (adjusted RR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.35 to 1.15), and 1.30% in PES patients (adjusted RR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.94). The incidence of MI was 3.8% in BMS-treated patients, 4.5% in DES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.51), 4.1% in SES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.15, 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.47), and 5.3% in PES-treated patients (adjusted RR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.81). Whereas overall 2-year adjusted mortality was similar in the BMS and the 2 DES stent groups, 12- to 24-month mortality was higher in patients treated with PES (RR 1.46, 95% CI: 1.02 to 2.09). Target lesion revascularization was reduced in both DES groups. CONCLUSIONS: During 2 years of follow-up, patients treated with PES had an increased risk of ST and MI compared with those treated with BMS and SES. Mortality after 12 months was also increased in PES patients.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Feb 24;53(8):665-619232898
PubMed ID
19232897 View in PubMed
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A 3-year follow-up of participation in peer support groups after a cardiac event.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53243
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Cathrine Hildingh
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Otto Torells Gata 16, Varberg 432 44, Sweden. Catherine.Hildingh@hos.hh.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):315-20
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary - rehabilitation
Case-Control Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - rehabilitation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - rehabilitation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Peer Group
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self-Help Groups
Sweden
Abstract
Secondary prevention is an important component of a structured rehabilitation programme following a cardiac event. Comprehensive programmes have been developed in many European countries, the vast majority of which are hospital based. In Sweden, all patients with cardiac disease are also given the opportunity to participate in secondary prevention activities arranged by the National Association for Heart and Lung Patients [The Heart & Lung School (HL)]. The aim of this 3-year longitudinal study was to compare persons who attended the HL after a cardiac event and those who declined participation, with regard to health aspects, life situation, social network and support, clinical data, rehospitalisation and mortality. Totally 220 patients were included in the study. The patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire on four occasions, in addition to visiting a health care center for physical examination. After 3 years, 160 persons were still participating, 35 of whom attended the HL. The results show that persons who participated in the HL exercised more regularly, smoked less and had a denser network as well as more social support from nonfamily members than the comparison groups. This study contributes to increased knowledge among healthcare professionals, politicians and decision makers about peer support groups as a support strategy after a cardiac event.
PubMed ID
15572020 View in PubMed
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[A controlled trial with prolonged follow up: percutaneous intervention in acute myocardial infarction is equivalent to thrombolytic therapy]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53870
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Aug 8;98(32-33):3397-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-8-2001
Author
P. Tornvall
M. Johansson
I. Herzfeld
T. Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Kardiologiska kliniken, Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm. per.tornvall@ks.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Aug 8;98(32-33):3397-9
Date
Aug-8-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - mortality - therapy
Myocardial Reperfusion - methods
Shock - drug therapy - therapy
Thrombolytic Therapy - contraindications
Abstract
Previous studies comparing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with thrombolysis for treatment of myocardial infarction with ST-elevation have in meta-analyses but not in randomized trials shown that PCI is more effective. Despite a large volume of primary PCI performed in Sweden no controlled trials have been carried out. The present study included 96 patients with myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation treated with primary PCI 1995-1998. The main indications were shock (15 cases), contraindication to thrombolysis (24 cases), as an alternative to thrombolysis (57 cases), with a mortality in the respective groups of 67, 25 and 10 percent. Controls matched for age and infarct location and treated with thrombolysis could be identified for 55 of the patients treated with PCI. After four years 40 percent and 52 percent of the patients treated with PCI and thrombolysis respectively reached the combined endpoint of death/myocardial infarction/revascularization/angina pectoris (not significant). In conclusion, the study shows that primary PCI in patients with myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation can be performed safely also in Sweden.
PubMed ID
11526657 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction: does pre-hospital treatment increase survival?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52222
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 2002 Sep;9(3):210-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
J. Koefoed-Nielsen
E F Christensen
H. Melchiorsen
A. Foldspang
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesiology, University Hospital of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 2002 Sep;9(3):210-6
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulances
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Denmark
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - therapy
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Urban Population
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a mobile emergency care unit (MECU) staffed with an anaesthetist, in terms of increased survival among patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI). The setting was an urban area with 330 000 inhabitants. This was a quasi-experimental before-and-after-study including consecutive emergency calls during September to November 1996 (Period 1, without the MECU) and September to November 1997 (Period 2, including the MECU). Fifty-four ambulance patients had their MI diagnosis confirmed at hospital during Period 1, and another 54 in Period 2. The 28-day mortality was collected from relevant registers. Twenty-four (44%) of Period 2 patients were transported by the MECU. MECU patients had lower systolic blood pressure (SBP) than other patients, both before and after hospital admission. Nitroglycerine treatment was relatively frequent in MECU patients, and cardioversion, anaesthesia and intubation was applied exclusively in these patients. After arrival at hospital, MECU patients had thrombolysis relatively often (46% versus 23% in other Period 2 patients) but percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) relatively infrequently (21% vs 30%). The total mortality was significantly lower in Period 2 than in Period 1 patients (11% vs 21%,
PubMed ID
12394616 View in PubMed
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Age and angina as predictors of quality of life after myocardial infarction: a prospective comparative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53820
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2001 Sep;35(4):252-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
I. Bengtsson
M. Hagman
H. Wedel
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia & Intensive Care, Kungälvs, Sjukhus, Sweden. inger.m.bengtsson@vgregion.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2001 Sep;35(4):252-8
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Angina Pectoris - complications - psychology
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Comparative Study
Coronary Artery Bypass
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - psychology - therapy
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The objectives were to compare quality of life (QoL) after first myocardial infarction with an age- and sex-adjusted normative population and to test whether the 1-month QoL had predictive properties. DESIGN: QoL was assessed by self-administered questionnaires (SF-36 and Cardiac Health Profile) 1, 3 and 6 months after index-event. Participants were 60 consecutive patients (20% women) with a mean age of 58 +/- 7.4 years. RESULTS: Patients > or =59 years improved in Physical (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS), scoring comparable to community norms at 6 months. However, patients
PubMed ID
11759119 View in PubMed
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[Angiographic results of primary angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53939
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 10;121(7):780-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-2001
Author
N E Kløw
B. Bendz
J. Eritsland
P. Hoffman
S. Stavnes
K H Stensaeth
E. Søvik
M. Brekke
A. Mangschau
Author Affiliation
Hjerte-lungesenteret, Ullevål sykehus, 0407 Oslo. n.e.klow@ioks.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 10;121(7):780-3
Date
Mar-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Coronary Angiography
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - therapy
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Percutaneous angioplasty is an alternative to thrombolysis to reestablish coronary blood flow in patients with transmural myocardial infarction. At present, this treatment option is not widely accepted in Norway. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From 1996 to 1998, one hundred consecutive patients were treated with angioplasty for acute transmural infarction. The angiography showed one-vessel disease in 55%, two-vessel in 25%, and multivessel in 20%. The infarct related artery was the LAD in 44%, the CX in 14%, the RCA in 41%, and bypass graft in one. 92% had TIMI 0 or 1 flow. Stent was placed in 73%, GPIIb/IIIa was used in 11% and temporary pacemaker placed in 5%. RESULTS: Successful angioplasty was performed in 95%, 3% was not done, and 2% failed. Peripheral stenoses were treated in 15% and stenoses in other arteries in 10%. Complications and events within 24 hours related to the angioplasty were seen in 9%. CONCLUSION: Primary angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction can be done with high primary success, good short-term results and few complications.
PubMed ID
11301697 View in PubMed
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[Angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction in patients transferred from other hospitals]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53833
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Oct 20;121(25):2933-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-2001
Author
A K Andreassen
A. Nanbjør
K. Endresen
J. Offstad
Author Affiliation
Hjertemedisinsk avdeling Rikshospitalet 0027 Oslo. arne.andreassen@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Oct 20;121(25):2933-7
Date
Oct-20-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - therapy
Norway
Patient Selection
Prospective Studies
Transportation of Patients
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Primary or rescue angioplasty are reperfusion modalities in selected patients with acute myocardial infarction, after initial diagnosis in local hospitals. We sought to evaluate the feasibility and safety of transporting patients to a tertiary care hospital for interventional treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between January 1999 and April 2000, 50 consecutive patients were included in this prospective observational study. Comparisons were performed between patients admitted to primary angioplasty, either directly (n = 20; group A) or from other hospitals (n = 14; group B), and those transferred for rescue angioplasty (n = 16; group C). RESULTS: No severe complications occurred during interhospital transport. Median time interval from onset of symptoms to hospitalization was comparable between groups. Median time interval from onset of symptoms to balloon inflation in group C (340 minutes) was significantly longer than in groups A and B (181 and 130 minutes). All patients were alive at follow-up after median 230 days. Median echocardiographically determined left ventricular ejection fraction in group A was non-significantly higher (50%) than in groups B and C (43% and 46%). INTERPRETATION: Acute transfer for primary or rescue angioplasty is feasible and safe for selected patients with acute myocardial infarction.
PubMed ID
11715776 View in PubMed
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Antiarrhythmic effect of repeated coronary occlusion during balloon angioplasty.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54534
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1997 Apr;29(5):1035-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
K E Airaksinen
H V Huikuri
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Laboratory, Department of Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland. kari.airaksinen@.oulu.fi
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1997 Apr;29(5):1035-8
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - physiopathology - therapy
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary - adverse effects
Arrhythmia - etiology - prevention & control
Blood pressure
Coronary Angiography
Female
Humans
Ischemic Preconditioning, Myocardial
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the present study was to assess whether brief, repeated coronary artery occlusions during balloon angioplasty protect against ischemia-induced ventricular ectopy. BACKGROUND: Most sudden cardiac deaths are caused by fatal ventricular arrhythmias precipitated by early myocardial ischemia of acute coronary occlusion. In animals, a preceding 3- to 5-min coronary occlusion protects against malignant ventricular arrhythmias during a subsequent prolonged coronary occlusion. Whether such an antiarrhythmic effect caused by ischemic preconditioning occurs in humans is not known. METHODS: To assess the effects of a preceding, brief vessel occlusion-reperfusion cycle on the occurrence of ventricular ectopy, continuous electrocardiographic, heart rate and blood pressure recordings were performed in 156 patients before and during two identical balloon occlusions of a coronary artery (mean 111 s) separated by a 5-min equilibration period. RESULTS: The occluded vessel was the left anterior descending coronary artery in 94 patients, the left circumflex branch in 29 patients and the right coronary artery in 33 patients. Balloon occlusion of a coronary artery caused ventricular ectopy in 24 patients. The incidence of ventricular ectopy was higher during the first occlusion than during the second occlusion (21 patients [13.5%] vs. 11 patients [7%], p = 0.02). In 13 patients, ventricular ectopy was observed only during the first occlusion; in 8 patients during both occlusions; and in 3 patients only during the second occlusion. Bigeminal or repetitive ectopic beats were observed in eight patients during the first coronary occlusion and in four patients during the second occlusion. Atrial premature beats occurred during the first occlusion in three patients, but in none of the patients during the second occlusion. The 24 patients with ventricular ectopy during coronary occlusion had milder stenosis than the rest of the patients (mean [+/- SD] 74 +/- 12% vs. 81 +/- 12%, p = 0.01). The 13 patients with ventricular ectopy only during the first occlusion did not, however, differ significantly with respect to any clinical or angiographic features from the rest of the patients with ventricular ectopy. There were no significant differences in the signs of myocardial ischemia or hemodynamic variables between the sequential occlusions. CONCLUSIONS: A preceding, short vessel occlusion-reperfusion cycle seems to increase the electrical stability of ischemic myocardium.
PubMed ID
9120156 View in PubMed
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[Antithrombotic treatment in percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54416
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Feb 20;118(5):729-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-1998
Author
M. Brekke
K. Kuiper
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for hjerte- og karradiologi, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Feb 20;118(5):729-32
Date
Feb-20-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage
English Abstract
Fibrinolytic Agents - administration & dosage
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - therapy
Thrombolytic Therapy
Abstract
Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty is the most commonly used method for coronary revascularization in Norway. More than 3,500 procedures were performed in 1997. The presence of atherosclerotic endothelium is a strong stimulus to increased haemostasis. During balloon angioplasty, activation of the coagulation system is further increased by the trauma caused to the vessel wall. Major complications associated with coronary angioplasty include vessel occlusion, myocardial infarction, and periprocedural death. Most early complications occur as a result of the formation of a thrombus at the angioplasty site. Effective antithrombotic treatment is essential to reduce the risk of thromboembolic complications during and after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty with or without stent implantation. All patients should be treated in advance with acetylsalicylic acid. Heparin must be given during the procedure. After stent implantation the patient should be treated with a combination of the two antiplatelet agents acetylsalicylic acid and ticlopidine. This article presents the current practice for using antithrombotic medication in percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.
PubMed ID
9528370 View in PubMed
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197 records – page 1 of 20.